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Graphics/Benchmarks

Nvidia GRID adds high-end Linux power to any device

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Nvidia has added high-end Linux power to its GRID cloud gaming service, which can be used on an device.

GRID currently powers 3D graphics of VMware’s recently released Horizon 6 for Linux, meaning users can offer a high-end Linux workstation experience.

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Nvidia Is Now Using a New Linux Kernel Module Source Layout

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Nvidia is making some changes to the way it's installing its drivers on the Linux systems and they are now using a new kernel module source layout. It's not something that will directly impact users, but it's interesting to see that Nvidia is starting to shake things a little bit.

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NVIDIA's 352 Linux Driver Against Linux 4.1 With Nouveau Gallium3D

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Graphics/Benchmarks

After earlier this week looking at whether the open-source NVIDIA driver is fast enough for Steam Linux gaming, here are some benchmark results that compare the performance of the latest Nouveau Gallium3D driver code against the latest NVIDIA binary Linux graphics driver.

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Open-Source AMD/NVIDIA GPU Tests On Linux 4.1 + Mesa 10.7-dev

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Graphics/Benchmarks
OSS

As part of the other Linux graphics tests running this week, here are the results of eight different graphics cards -- from both NVIDIA and AMD -- being tested on the latest open-source Linux graphics drivers under a variety of OpenGL Linux games. The software stack making up this round of testing was the Linux 4.1.1 kernel and Mesa 10.7-devel atop Ubuntu 15.04.

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AMD Catalyst 15.7 Linux Benchmarks: R9 290 Hawaii & R9 285 Tonga

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Graphics/Benchmarks

I'm in the midst of a new large open-source and (separately) closed-source NVIDIA/AMD Linux graphics card comparison on the latest drivers as part of an upcoming Radeon R7 370 Linux review and to be followed by R9 Fury Linux benchmarks. However, for those interested in the Catalyst 15.7 benchmarks on Linux, I ran some quick tests with a Radeon R9 285 and R9 290.

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Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Libinput

NVIDIA

AMD

  • What Do You Hope To See Out Of Today's Expected Catalyst Linux Update?

    It's expected that today AMD will be releasing an updated Catalyst (v15.20) Linux graphics driver. Aside from Radeon Rx 300/Fury graphics card support, what do you hope is part of this new driver series?

  • AMD Radeon 300 Series On Linux - Catalyst: 0 vs. Open-Source: 1

    When receiving the MSI Radeon R7 370 for review on Phoronix, I first tried installing the latest publicly available driver from the AMD web-site... The Catalyst 15.5 for Linux that has been available on AMD.com since early June. Since then they haven't put out any stable/beta Catalyst Linux releases, even after the Rx 300 series launch. When trying to install this latest Catalyst Linux driver atop Ubuntu 15.04, it became quickly apparent that it was unsupported....

  • A Look At CS:GO & TF2 On AMD GPUs With The Open-Source Driver

    In the testing so far has been a Radeon HD 6870, HD 6950, HD 7850, R9 290, and R7 370. There will be more cards in the R7 370 Linux review along with some fresh open-source NVIDIA benchmark results. Tests were done on Linux 4.1.1 and Mesa 10.7-devel atop Ubuntu 15.04. Linux 4.2 Git couldn't be tested (plus the R9 285 with AMDGPU) since this particular test system is still plagued by the Linux 4.2 kernel panics.

  • AMD FirePro S9170 Rolls Out With 32GB Of GDDR5 Memory

Mesa

See How Your Linux PC Compares To The Core i7 5775C With Iris 6200 Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Now that I seem to have found a workaround for my Core i7 5775C Broadwell Linux issue that resulted in very frequent kernel panics, it's off to the benchmark races. Here are some preliminary Linux benchmark figures for this first socketed Intel Broadwell LGA-1150 desktop CPU with Iris 6200 graphics.

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Benchmarks Of 54 Different Intel/AMD Linux Systems

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

This week in celebrating 200,000 benchmark results in our LinuxBenchmarking.com test lab, I ran another large comparison against the latest spectrum of hardware/software in the automated performance test lab.

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Intel Has More Graphics Code For Testing, Plans For Linux 4.3

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While the Linux 4.2 kernel merge window isn't even over yet, Intel developers already have new code ready for testing that will be merged eventually for Linux 4.3.

With their updated -testing Git repository, there are DSI improvements, more enablement for Broxton hardware, Cherryview improvements, PPGTT polishing, the kernel mode-setting Kconfig option is no longer exposed as it's a requirement, and there's the continuing code churn around atomic mode-setting.

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical/Ubuntu: FOSDEM 2021 Community DevRoom, Snap Store and Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

  • Laura Czajkowski: FOSDEM Community Devroom 2021 CFP

    The twenty-first edition of FOSDEM will take place 6-7 February, 2021 – online, and we’re happy to announce that there will be a virtual Community DevRoom as part of the event.

  • When you need the numbers just right – benchmark and profiling applications in the Snap Store | Ubuntu

    The world of software is a vast and complex one, often too difficult to easily assess by human intuition alone. Which is why detailed and accurate measurements of software behavior are essential in helping us understand and gauge how well our applications perform. The Snap Store has a fair share of productivity tools and utilities, including a wide range of benchmarking and profiling tools. These are designed to help developers, system administrators and hardcore enthusiasts get a precise sense of their software, whether as part of research and design or for troubleshooting ongoing problems in production environments. Let’s have a little tour.

  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

    The Ubuntu Technical Board is responsible for the technical direction of Ubuntu. It makes decisions on package selection, packaging policy, installation systems and processes, kernel, X server, display management, library versions, and dependencies. The board works with relevant teams to establish a consensus on the right path to take, especially where diverse elements of Ubuntu cannot find consensus on shared components. The current Technical Board is expiring at the end of the year, and the Community Council would like to confirm a new Technical Board, consisting of five people, who will serve for two years.

Wine 6.0-rc1 Released

  • Wine 6.0-rc1 Released

    The Wine development release 6.0-rc1 is now available. This is the first release candidate for the upcoming Wine 6.0. It marks the beginning of the yearly code freeze period. Please give this release a good testing to help us make 6.0 as good as possible.

  • Wine 6.0-RC1 Released Following Last Minute Changes - Phoronix

    As expected, the first release candidate of Wine 6.0 is now available for testing for this annual update to Wine for running Windows programs and games on Linux and other platforms. Wine 6.0-RC1 marks the start of the code/feature freeze ahead of Wine 6.0.0, which should be out in January. Until then the release candidates will continue.

  • The road to Wine 6.0 begins with a first Release Candidate | GamingOnLinux

    The Wine compatibility layer for running Windows applications on Linux and other systems has a new development release up, the first Release Candidate for Wine 6.0. Marking the beginning of a code freeze period, where the Wine team will now be focusing on stability rather than chucking in new features to make Wine 6.0 as good as it can be.

Three Other Web Browsers for Linux You Should Try

Most Linux users will be familiar with the Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox web browsers. As good as they are, these aren’t the only two browsers available. There are so many other browsers available for Linux, and it’s important to give them all at least a solid try. You’ll learn here about three alternative web browsers for Linux. Read more

today's howtos

  • Five practical guides for managing Linux terminal and commands [Ed: People from Linux Foundation are renaming GNU programs "LINUX"]
  • Add a subcommand showing GNU Guix history of all packages

    Hello, everyone! I'm Magali and for the next three months, I'll be an Outreachy intern in the GNU Guix community. As part of my Outreachy application process, I made my first ever contribution to Free Software adding a package to Guix, and since then I'm eager to begin contributing even more. My task for this three-month period is to add a subcommand showing the history of all packages. Although Guix makes it possible to install and have an older version of a package, it isn't as easy to find, for example, the commit related to these versions. The subcommand I'll implement will be something like guix git log. The idea is that, for instance, when the user invokes guix git log --oneline | grep msmtp, a list with all the commits, one per line, related to msmtp, will be shown.

  • WildFly server configuration with Ansible collection for JCliff, Part 2

    Welcome to the second part of this series introducing Ansible collection for JCliff. This new extension is designed for fine-tuning WildFly or Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) configurations using Ansible. In Part 1, we installed JCliff and its Ansible collection and prepared our environment. We set up a minimal, working playbook for installing JCliff on the target system. In this article, we will focus on configuring a few of our WildFly server’s subsystems.

  • Bpytop on openSUSE

    I recently published an article about how great Bashtop is on openSUSE, and when I was nearly done with it, I was told about Bpytop. Since I was going through the final edit, I didn’t just want to dump what I did before but rather, follow it up with Bpytop. I am not sure how far behind the curve I am now and maybe there is something even cooler out there but before anyone tells me what the latest hotness is in terminal, system monitoring applications, I am feverishly writing about this What is so great about Bpytop? If you are a nerd about what your system is doing and like to see the numbers, charts graphs, etc, and you have previously enjoyed Bashtop, Bpytop is going to send tingles of joy down your finger tips. The little bits of information it gives you from CPU load, load average, and frequency is superb. The chart it produces on the CPU usage looks fantastic and really makes you wonder how they accomplished this when it is only in text mode. Truly a feat of terminal engineering!

  • Work-around in Linux to switch between single-sided and double-sided printing | Fitzcarraldo's Blog

    I use Gentoo Linux on my laptop, and have drivers installed for quite a few printer manufacturers and models, as I work in multiple offices and they have a wide range of printers and MFPs. To date I have had no trouble printing single-sided (‘simplex’) and double-sided (‘duplex’) documents on the printers that support duplex printing. However, one of the offices I have been working in recently has a Konica Minolta bizhub C368, a floor-standing MFP, and the printer in this MFP did not enable me to switch between single-sided and double-sided printing even though Windows users in the same office could. This article explains how I managed to switch between the two printing modes.

  • [Older] LFCS - Scheduling Tasks

    Sometimes it is necessary to have tasks execute at specific times. Automating tasks to run at specific times can be a very necessary administrative function. Even on a home system tasks can be automated to reduce your time from ‘babysitting’ your system.

  • Everything you need to know about Kubernetes namespaces. - UX Techno

    Kubernetes namespaces is a virtual cluster being created within the actual Kubernetes cluster. This will bring separation between the different Kubernetes objects such as Pods, deployments and service etc. This will comes handy in order to separate your cluster environment wise or among the different teams.