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Graphics/Benchmarks

Kernel and Graphics: TPM, Intel and Matrox

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Measured boot with a TPM 2.0 in U-Boot

    A Trusted Platform Module, in short TPM, is a small piece of hardware designed to provide various security functionalities. It offers numerous features, such as storing secrets, ‘measuring’ boot, and may act as an external cryptographic engine. The Trusted Computing Group (TCG) delivers a document called TPM Interface Specifications (TIS) which describes the architecture of such devices and how they are supposed to behave as well as various details around the concepts.

    These TPM chips are either compliant with the first specification (up to 1.2) or the second specification (2.0+). The TPM2.0 specification is not backward compatible and this is the one this post is about.

    [...]

    A solid TPM 2.0 stack has been around for Linux for quite some time, in the form of the tpm2-tss and tpm2-tools projects. More specifically, a daemon called resourcemgr, is provided by the tpm2-tss project. For people coming from the TPM 1.2 world, this used to be called trousers. One can find some commands ready to be used in the tpm2-tools repository, useful for testing purpose.

  • Intel Linux Graphics Driver Scheduling Improvements In The Works

    Longtime open-source Intel Linux kernel graphics driver developer Chris Wilson has out a big new set of patches.

    Last month I wrote about the work done by Chris Wilson on fair low-latency scheduling for the Intel graphics driver. At the time it amounted to 28 patches for this code inspired by the BFS/MuQSS CPU scheduler. But now it's morphed into a much larger scheduling rework that is at 68 patches.

  • Linux Seeing Kernel GPU Driver Support Two Decades Later For Matrox G200 Graphics Cards

    The Matrox G200 series desktop graphics cards released in the late 90's are now seeing open-source DRM kernel driver support emerge in 2020.

    The Linux kernel has provided a "MGAG200" Direct Rendering Manager driver going back to the early Linux 3.x kernel days. This MGA G200 DRM driver though has just been focused on the numerous server motherboards having G200 chips for display purposes. The actual MGA G200 series desktop graphics cards have not worked with this Linux kernel driver, at least until now.

Graphics: AMD GPU, Libinput, Intel's Elkhart Lake

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD's Next-Gen Navi 22 'Navy Flounder' GPU Spied In Latest Linux Driver Release

    There's a new Linux driver release that contains a reference to an upcoming AMD graphics processing unit (GPU) codenamed "Navy Flounder," and now I can't get that Pinkard & Bowden song out of my head. You know, the fishy one titled, "I Lobster But Never Flounder." Yeah, don't judge, click that link and it will be stuck in YOUR head as well. You're welcome.

    But I digress—I'm not here to discuss goofy country songs. This is all about AMD's upcoming Navi launch, which is underpinned by the same second-generation Radeon DNA (RDNA 2) architecture that will power both Sony's PlayStation 5 and Microsoft's Xbox Series X consoles, as well as a new round of Radeon graphics cards.

  • Libinput 1.16 Will Warn You If Your System Is Too Slow

    It's been over a half-year already for the current libinput 1.15 series for this input handling library used on both X.Org and Wayland environments. But libinput 1.16 is finally en route with the first release candidate out today.

    Libinput 1.16 has been baking a while due to no pressing features that needed to be shipped right away and seeing a number of 1.15.x point releases. Coming with this new series for libinput are:

    - Monitoring of timestamps compared to when the libinput dispatch function is called by the compositor. If the difference is too large that it could result in issues for input processing, a new warning is displayed in the log that the event processing is lagging behind and the system is "too slow."

  • Intel Adds More "Elkhart Lake" IDs To Their Linux Graphics Driver Code

    Two new PCI IDs were added for Elkhart Lake and two for Jasper Lake graphics that are in new hardware configurations as well. The new 0x4555 is Elkhart Lake graphics in a two subslice configuration with eight EUs per subslice along with a similar 0x4E55 addition for Jasper Lake with the 2x8 configuration.. The two other new IDs are 0x4557 and 0x4E57 for Elkhart and Jasper, respectively, that are for a four subslice configuration with five EUs per subslice.

AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC – Running Linux – Benchmarks – Week 2

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

This is a weekly blog chronicling my experiences of running the AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC on Linux.

I was intending to kick off Week 2 of this series with testing multimedia on the AK41. But we’ve received requests to benchmark this Mini Desktop Computer.

For this week’s blog, I’ve run a variety of benchmarking tests on the AWOW AK41 Mini PC together with three other systems to put the results into context. All the tests use the Phoronix Test Suite, unless otherwise stated. For ease of reference, I list system information about the 4 machines under the spotlight on each page. Together with the AWOW AK41, I’ve included another Mini PC from AWOW. This is the NYI3. I’ve also included a laptop from ASUS (UX305FA), and a Mini PC from Gigabyte (BXBT-1900). They are all low-power machines.

Read more

Graphics and Hardware: Mesa, RADV, NIR and DDR

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 20.2's Nouveau Enables HMM, OpenCL SVM Now Supported

    The open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver stack reached a new milestone today with the user-space code in Mesa 20.2 finally flipping on the Heterogeneous Memory Management (HMM) support.

    It's been a long road with the work done by Red Hat, NVIDIA engineers themselves on the open-source Nouveau HMM bits too, and the community in getting heterogeneous memory management mainlined and working. This has also been part of Red Hat's broader OpenCL/compute upbringing in recent years for the Nouveau driver stack. But finally today the HMM caps are set in exposing it in user-space for the NVC0 driver with Pascal GPUs and newer.

  • RADV Driver Lands Support For Vulkan Extended Dynamic State

    The newest addition to Mesa's RADV Radeon Vulkan driver is support for the recently published VK_EXT_extended_dynamic_state extension.

    VK_EXT_extended_dynamic_state debuted in late June with Vulkan 1.2.145 as an extension developed by the likes of Valve, Intel, NVIDIA, Google, AMD, and others. VK_EXT_extended_dynamic_state adds additional dynamic state for accommodating games/applications needing to reduce the number of pipeline state objects they compile and bind. The details are laid out in full via the Khronos spec.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: aNIRtomy

    I’ve spent a lot of time talking about NIR and writing passes, so let’s take a shallow dive into what exactly that means.

    To start, there’s this idea of a “lowering” pass, where “lowering” means reducing or changing some part of the shader representation. These passes are run for various reasons, ranging from handling compatibility (e.g., the gl_FragColor -> gl_FragData[n] pass I discussed previously) to optimizing the shader by removing unused variables and instructions.

    [...]

    In this, the pass iterates over the shader’s functions, then creates a nir_builder (an object used for altering shader internals) while it iterates the blocks within the function. A function block is a group of instructions contained within a given scope, e.g., a conditional. The pass iterates into each block, looping over all the instructions and passing them to the lower_impl internal function for the pass, which is where all the work happens.

  • AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT Memory Scaling Performance Under 100 Different Tests

    For those thinking of picking up one of the new AMD Ryzen 3000XT series processors and weighing whether it's worthwhile on your budget picking up DDR4-3600 memory or other higher frequency DDR4 modules, here are some fresh benchmark results with the Ryzen 9 3900XT looking at 100 different tests on Linux and showing how the performance changes from DDR4-2133 through DDR4-3800.

  • JEDEC Publishes DDR5 Standard - Launching At 4.8 Gbps, Better Power Efficiency

    The DDR5 standard is expected to see the first DIMMs launching at a speed of 4.8Gbps, the Vdd is down to 1.1V (compared to 1.2V with DDR4), support for on-die ECC and other new features like decision feedback equalization, usage of MIPI I3C as the system management bus, and other improvements over DDR4.

Intel DG1 Graphics Card Bring-Up On Linux Continues - Latest Bits For Local Memory

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Recently there have been a lot of open-source Linux patches flowing concerning Intel's bring-up of their DG1 discrete graphics card for developers. That work continued this week with the latest patches in wiring up LMEM support.

Among the recent Intel DG1 patches for Linux recently have been on the media driver front, compute runtime with OpenCL and Level Zero and as part of that the IGC support, and then most importantly the necessary Linux kernel changes building off the existing Gen12/Xe graphics support.

Read more

Also: Intel AMX Support Lands In The GNU Assembler

Graphics: Zink, VA-API, NVIDIA's NVAPI SDK

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Graphics/Benchmarks

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Extensions

    Usually I cover in-depth looks at various chunks of code I’ve been working on, but today it’s going to be a more traditional style of modern blogging: memes and complaining.

  • New VA-API H.264 decoder in gst-plugins-bad

    Recently, a new H.264 decoder, using VA-API, was merged in gst-plugins-bad.

    Why another VA-based H.264 decoder if there is already gstreamer-vaapi?

    As usual, an historical perspective may give some clues.

    It started when Seungha Yang implemented the GStreamer decoders for Windows using DXVA2 and D3D11 APIs.

    Perhaps we need one step back and explain what are stateless decoders.

  • NVIDIA open sourced part of NVAPI SDK to aid 'Windows emulation environments'

    NVIDIA sneakily put out a little open source release recently, with a part of the NVAPI SDK now under the MIT license.

    This was mentioned by the crew working on the DXVK translation layer in the VKx Discord, who sent along word to me as well. NVAPI is NVIDIA's core software development kit that allows direct access to NVIDIA GPUs and drivers on all Windows platforms.

    Now, that doesn't sound interesting for Linux obviously but here's why this actually is important: in the NVAPI Open Source SDK, it directly mentions that the contained "nvapi.h" file that's now provided under the MIT license was done to enable "open source re-implementations of NVAPI for Windows emulation environments"—so the Wine and Proton compatibility layers are what they're getting at without naming them directly.

AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT vs. Intel Core i9 10900K Linux Gaming Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the 130+ benchmarks of the AMD Ryzen 3000XT series earlier in the week looking at the CPU/system performance on Ubuntu Linux, here is our first look at the Linux gaming performance with putting the Ryzen 9 3900XT up head-to-head against the Intel Core i9 10900K.

This Linux gaming bout is looking at the Core i9 10900K vs. Ryzen 9 3900XT for Linux gaming while also looking at the CPU power consumption and performance-per-Watt.

Read more

Graphics: Wayland-Info, NVIDIA Vulkan Beta Driver and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • weston-info as a standalone utility
    Hi all,
    
    A long time ago [1], I suggested that we move weston-info out of the
    Weston source tree because this is a very useful tool which gives
    important information about any Wayland compositor, not just Weston.
    
    The general consensus was it was a good idea, unfortunately other more
    important things happened, people (including me) eventually forgot
    about that and it never actually came to fruition…
    
    But the need remains, I think we should have a compositor agnostic
    tool that gives the general information about the running compositor.
    And we should not need to install Weston for that alone.
    
    So I took the liberty to uproot weston-info, rename it as wayland-info
    and put it on its own repo:
    
    https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/ofourdan/wayland-info
    
    As you can see, I took great care to preserve the git history of
    weston-info in the process.
    
    In the meantime, Peter has already submitted patches to wayland-info
    (thanks Peter!) so the tip of wayland-info is different from
    weston-info (basically, we have diverged already).
    
    Eventually, if nobody has objections, we could move that repo to the
    wayland domain…
    
    Cheers,
    Olivier.
    
  • Wayland-Info Spun From Weston Code For Offering Wayland Helper Tool

    Wayland's Weston compositor has provided a weston-info utility to display information on supported Wayland extensions and versioning along with other details of the Wayland compositor environment. That utility is now being spun out as wayland-info as a Wayland compositor-agnostic utility for displaying this information.

    Olivier Fourdan of Red Hat has been working on spinning out weston-info as wayland-info for serving as its own standalone utility while some other common Wayland utilities/examples may end up being added to its source tree as well, akin to mesa-utils.

  • NVIDIA Vulkan Beta Driver 450.56.01 out, Ray Tracing and bug fixes

    Shortly after giving us a brand new stable mainline driver, the NVIDIA driver team have released a new developer-focused Vulkan Beta Driver.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Restart

    The last remaining feature for GL 3.1 was primitive restart, which allows an indexed draw command to end the current primitive when a specified index is processed, beginning a new one of the same type with the next index.

Graphics: Mesa 20.1.3 and Collabora Working for Microsoft

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Microsoft
  • mesa 20.1.3

    Hi all,

    I'd like to announce Mesa 20.1.3, the third bugfix release for the 20.1 branch.

    There's a lot in there, but more than half of the commits are just updates to
    our testing infrastructure; nothing out of the ordinary in the driver changes.

    The next bugfix release is planned for 2 weeks from now, on 2020-07-22.

    Cheers,
    Eric

  • Mesa 20.1.3 Brings More Fixes To The Open-Source Vulkan / OpenGL Drivers

    Mesa 20.1.3 is out as the newest bi-weekly point release for this stable Mesa3D series.

    Mesa 20.2 continues building up a lot of feature work and should ultimately see its first official release around the end of August, but for now Mesa 20.1.x is the greatest when it comes to stable material. Mesa 20.1.3 is now the newest routine update for users of these predominantly OpenGL/Vulkan drivers.

  • Deep dive into OpenGL over DirectX layering [Ed: Microsoft is attacking OpenGL again, the EEE way]

    Earlier this year, we announced a new project in partnership with Microsoft: the implementation of OpenCL and OpenGL to DirectX 12 translation layers (Git repository). Time for a summer update! In this blog post, I will explain a little more about the OpenGL part of this work and more specifically the steps that have been taken to improve the performance of the OpenGL-On-D3D12 driver.

  • Progress Being Made On OpenCL+OpenGL Over Direct3D 12 [Ed: Microsoft pays Collabora to promote proprietary vendor lock-in; see comments]

    That OpenCL/OpenGL-over-D3D12 initiative was announced earlier this year only for it then to become public later that it's principally for the Direct3D 12 support coming to WSL2. With that there can then be the OpenGL graphics and OpenCL compute within the Linux WSL2 instances that in turn end up using the native D3D12 drivers of the host. Besides this layering library being developed with Collabora, Microsoft has also been working on a Wayland compositor as part of the GUI app support and the DirectX Linux kernel driver and Hyper-V DRM driver.

    Collabora for their part have published an update on their engineering effort of translating OpenGL and OpenCL for DirectX 12 consumption. They are making good progress and even have a Doom 3 time demo working. Obviously the resulting performance has been a big concern and focus.

  • Welcoming five new Collaborans!

    With over 15 years' experience in working remotely, Collabora was, and continues to be, uniquely prepared to support our customers and our teams during these challenging times. Despite the many obstacles brought on by the pandemic, we have continued delivering services to our clients, and continue to build and strengthen our engineering and administration teams for the road ahead.

    Based in Canada, India, the United Kingdom, Brazil and Cyprus, these newest Collaborans join our worldwide team of highly skilled engineers, developers and managers who all share a common passion for technology and Open Source.

Nvidia 450.57 Linux Graphics Driver Improves Support for Vulkan Apps, Adds New Features

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Coming hot on the heels of last month’s Nvidia 440.100 release, the Nvidia 450.57 graphics driver is here to add support for NVIDIA NGX, support for Image Sharpening for OpenGL and Vulkan apps, as well as support for Vulkan direct-to-display on DisplayPort displays connected via DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport (DP-MST).

Furthermore, the new release adds an implementation of glNamedBufferPageCommitmentARB extension, which was missing from the Nvidia driver’s support for the GL_ARB_sparse_buffer extension, a new documentation file that exposes a machine-readable list of supported GPUs and features, as well as a new Connector-N display connector name alias type.

Read more

Also: NVIDIA 450.57 Linux Driver Released With Image Sharpening Option, NGX Library

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