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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: AMDGPU, Radeon, Intel DRM

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDGPU DC Code Lands For Linux 4.15 Kernel

    Linus Torvalds has accepted the AMDGPU DC display code pull request for the Linux 4.15 kernel. AMD Linux users can now rejoice!

    Overnight David Airlie sent in the AMDGPU DC pull request for Linux 4.15 and since then Linus Torvalds was active on the kernel mailing list ranting about AMD header files and other unrelated to DC code. He was also pulling in other PRs... It was getting a bit worrisome, given the DC code not being in pristine shape, but it was exciting as heck to see this evening that he did go ahead and pull in the 132 thousand lines of new kernel code to land this AMDGPU DC. Linus hasn't provided any commentary about DC on the kernel mailing list as of writing.

  • Radeon VCN Encode Support Lands In Mesa 17.4 Git

    It's an exciting day for open-source Radeon Linux users today as besides the AMDGPU DC pull request (albeit still unmerged as of writing), Radeon VCN encoding support has landed in Mesa Git.

  • The - Hopefully - Final Stab At Intel Fastboot Support

    Intel's Maarten Lankhorst has sent out what could be the final patches for enabling "fastboot" support by default within their DRM graphics driver.

Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • R600 Gallium3D Shader Image Support Lands, Other R600g Patches Pending

    As a follow-up to OpenGL 4.2 Support Could Soon Land For AMD Cayman GPUs On R600g, the patches have landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git! Plus other R600g patches are on the mailing list for review.

    These shader image support patches for R600g expose OpenGL's ARB_shader_image_size and ARB_shader_image_load_store for Radeon HD 5000/6000 series. In the process, this ends up taking Radeon HD 6900 "Cayman" GPUs to having OpenGL 4.2 compliance from 4.1 with the shader image support having been the last blocker. Other GPUs on R600g remain at OpenGL 3.3 due to lacking FP64 support, as outlined more extensively in that previous article.

  • GeForce GTX 900 Series Re-Clocking Patches Updated By Karol Herbst

    Frequent Nouveau open-source NVIDIA driver contributor Karol Herbst has posted his latest patch series in working towards GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell 2" graphics processor re-clocking.

  • 25 More AMDGPU DC Patches, Mostly Focused On Raven DCN

    DCN in this context is for current the DCN 1.0 Raven Ridge family of display engines. The just-launched Vega+Zen APUs feature a new display engine and that's what this DCN code is for, which is also under a separate Kconfig tunable from the rest of AMDGPU DC.

Linux File-System Benchmarks On The Intel Optane 900P SSD

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this week I presented out initial Linux benchmarks of the Intel Optane 900P SSD with this 3D XPoint memory U.2 solid-state drive delivering incredible performance figures. Those tests were done with EXT4 while in this article are more tests with other mainline Linux file-systems and also testing some of the different mount options.

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Graphics: Intel, Mesa, Wayland and Bosch

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel's Mesa GLSL Shader Cache Is Speeding Up Game Load Times

    At the start of the month the Intel i965 Mesa driver finally landed its on-disk shader cache, months after the GLSL on-disk shader cache originally landed in core Mesa and wired up for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. While you can't play too many shader-heavy games with current Intel integrated graphics, this GLSL shader cache within Mesa 17.4-dev Git is working well for speeding up load times and does provide some frame-rate benefits in games dynamically loading shaders.

  • Bosch Has Been Developing A 3D Window Manager Using Wayland

    In what appears to be research for potential use within in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems, Bosch in conjunction with other organizations has been developing a 3D window manager that's built atop Wayland/Weston.

    Wayland is already used within automobiles for IVI purposes, etc, but this is the first we're seeing at least publicly of creating a 3D window manager around it. Harsha Manjula Mallikarjun of Bosch has talked about their work in developing a middleware framework for a 3D window manager that is making use of Wayland's Weston library, libweston. The window manager maps client buffers to 3D shapes like cubes and cylinders.

  • MESA_program_binary_formats Added To The OpenGL Registry

    Intel developers have seen their MESA_program_binary_formats extension added to the official OpenGL registry.

    The extension is really quite simple and just documents the unique format designator to be used by Mesa for ARB_get_program_binary/OES_get_program_binary extensions. Overnight it was merged into the OpenGL Registry.

Graphics: OpenGL and VC5

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Crunch Texture Compression Showing Off Promising Results For Unity

    The Crunch texture compression library developed by former Valve Linux/OpenGL engineer Rich Geldreich who cofounded the Binomial consulting firm is making much progress with showing off impressive compression capabilities for game engines.

    Unity 3D, which formerly employed Geldreich post-Valve, is finding encouraging results for this texture compression library with the Unity 2017.3 game engine that's now in beta. Their updated Crunch library in Unity 2017.3 is compressing DXT textures up to 2.5x faster while having about a 10% better compression ratio. Additionally, the latest Crunch is now able to handle more texture formats as well, including for iOS and Android with ETC textures.

  • VC4 & VC5 Drivers Get More Fixes Ahead Of The Holidays

    Eric Anholt at Broadcom has continued his spree of bringing up the next-gen VC5 Linux graphics driver stack while also continuing to maintain and improve upon the VC4 driver most commonly associated as being the open-source GPU driver option for the Raspberry Pi.

  • Igalia Posts Initial OpenGL SPIR-V Patches For Mesa, Intel i965

    Spanish development outfit Igalia has posted their initial work on wiring up the OpenGL 4.6 ARB_gl_spirv and ARB_spirv_extensions into core Mesa and the i965 OpenGL driver.

Graphics: OpenGL, Mesa, VESA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • OpenGL 4.2 Support Could Soon Land For AMD Cayman GPUs On R600g

    David Airlie is looking to land OpenGL image support in the R600 Gallium3D driver that would be enabled for Radeon HD 5000 "Evergreen" GPUs and newer. For the HD 6900 "Cayman" GPUs, this would be the last step taking it to exposing OpenGL 4.2 compliance.

  • mesa 17.3.0-rc4

    The fourth release candidate for Mesa 17.3.0 is now available.

    As per the issue tracker [1] we still have a number of outstanding bugs blocking the release.

  • Mesa 17.3-RC4 Released, Handful Of Blocker Bugs Still Left

    Emil Velikov of Collabora has just announced the fourth weekly release candidate of the upcoming Mesa 17.3.

    The development cycle for 17.3 is going into overtime with no 17.3.0 stable release yet ready due to open blocker bugs. As of this morning there are still eight open blocker bugs against the 17.3 release tracker. The open issues involve Intel GPU hangs with Counter-Strike: Global Offensive and DiRT Rally, some Intel OpenGL/Vulkan test case failures, a performance regression for i965, and some other Intel issues.

  • VESA Pushes Out DisplayID 2.0 As The Successor To EDID For Monitors & Electronics

    DisplayID 2.0 is now official as the VESA standard to succeed the long-used Extended Display Identification Data "EDID" by TVs, monitors, and other consumer electronics.

    DisplayID 2.0 is designed to fill the needs of modern hardware with 4K+ resolutions, High Dynamic Range, Adaptive-Sync, AR/VR, and other use-cases not conceived when EDID first premiered in the 90's as part of the DDC standard. Over EDID and E-EDID, DisplayID switches to using a variable length data structure and makes other fundamental design differences compared to these older identification standards.

  • Stereoscopy/3D Protocol Being Worked On For Wayland

    Collabora consultant Emmanuel Gil Peyrot has sent out a series of patches proposing a new (unstable) protocol for Wayland in dealing with stereoscopic layouts for 3D TV support but could be used in the future for VR HMDs, etc.

  • RADV Will Now Enable "Sisched" For The Talos Principle, Boosting Frame Rates

    The RADV Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver will now enable the sisched optimization automatically when running The Talos Principle in order to boost performance.

Linux Graphics and Games

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Marek Has Been Taking To AMDGPU LLVM Optimizations

    Well known AMD open-source driver developer Marek Olšák has ruthlessly been optimizing the Radeon Mesa driver stack for years. With RadeonSI getting fine-tuned and already largely outperforming the AMDGPU-PRO OpenGL driver and most of the big ticket improvements complete, it appears his latest focus is on further optimizing the AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end.

    This AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end is what's used by RadeonSI but is also leveraged by the RADV Vulkan driver, among other potential use-cases. Lately Marek has been filing patches for optimizing the instructions generated during the shader compilation process.

  • FFmpeg Expands Its NVDEC CUDA-Accelerated Video Decoding

    A few days back I wrote about FFmpeg picking up NVDEC-accelerated H.264 video decoding and since then more FFmpeg improvements have landed.

    As mentioned in the earlier article, NVDEC is the newer NVIDIA video decoding interface that is succeeding their Linux-specific VDPAU in favor of the cross-platform, CUDA-based NVIDIA Video Codec SDK. There's also NVENC on the video encode side, while the recent FFmpeg work has been focused on the NVDEC GPU-based video decoding.

  • Intel Batch Buffer Logger Updated For Mesa

    Intel's Kevin Rogovin has been working on a "BatchBuffer Logger" for the Intel graphics driver that offers some useful possibilities for assisting in debugging/analyzing problems or performance penalties facing game/application developers.

    The BatchBuffer Logger is designed to allow correlating API calls to data that in turn is added to a batch buffer for execution by the Intel graphics processor. The logger additionally keeps precise track of the GPU state and can report various metrics associated with each API call.

  • Feral Interactive continues to contribute to Mesa as one of its developers gets commit privileges

    Alex Smith of Feral has been granted the right to push code into Mesa, a continuing sign of the commitment of Feral to Mesa and Vulkan.

    In this recent exchange Feral dev and active Mesa contributor, Alex Smith, has asked and gotten permission to create an account to directly access the Mesa driver’s git. His stated purpose is to provide fixes for Vulkan drivers, so we can take that as a sign that Feral is pretty serious at not only contributing to the open source Mesa project but also at using the Vulkan API in their current and future ports.

  • I played a bit of Die Totenmaske and it was a very strange experience
  • Valve has added 11 new currencies to the Steam Store

    Recent changes to the Steam Store have seen the addition of more local currencies for customers in different regions. Expect to get more bang for your Peso or Dinar.

    Originally tweeted by the excellent SteamDB, it would seem that customers in different regions will be able to buy from the Steam Store using their local currency. This usually means lower prices and no fiddling about with conversion rates for currency and prices are also adjusted for regional standards. The changes went live earlier and users in the affected countries have gotten emails telling them about the new changes to the Steam Store.

  • Trüberbrook, a beautiful adventure game with Linux support, is on Kickstarter

    This story-driven adventure game set in 1960s Germany places you in the role of a young scientist who finds himself having to save the world.

  • Intra-System: Trust Issues fiendishly encourages betrayal, my thoughts on the experience

Ubuntu 17.10 Radeon Performance: Stock vs. X-Swat Updates vs. Oibaf PPA vs. Pkppa vs. Padoka PPA

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Graphics/Benchmarks

There are several Launchpad PPA options for Ubuntu users wanting to update their Mesa-based drivers. For those curious about the state of these different third-party repositories, here are a few words on them and benchmarks.

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Btrfs Zstd Compression Benchmarks On Linux 4.14

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Of the many new features in Linux 4.14, one of the prominent additions is initial support for Zstd compression that is initially wired in for transparent file-system compression with SquashFS and Btrfs. Here are some benchmarks of Zstd Btrfs compression compared to the existing LZO and Zlib compression mount options.

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AMD Linux Development

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring Queued For Linux 4.15

    We've been expecting it to happen for weeks while indeed the hwmon pull request was indeed sent in today exposing AMD Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC temperature reporting on Linux.

    The patch to the existing k10temp Linux hwmon driver has been floating around since September for AMD Zen / Family 17h temperature reporting finally being in place. It was staged in hwmon-next and is now called for pulling into the just-opened Linux 4.15 merge window.

  • Mesa Linux Graphics Stack Update Fixes AMD GPU Hang with Vulkan Dota 2 in VR

    Mesa, the open-source graphics stack for Linux-based operating systems, has been updated to this week to version 17.2.5, the fifth stability update to the Mesa 17.2 series.

    While Mesa devs are still working hard on the next major release of the graphics stack, Mesa 17.3, which is expected to arrive next week with numerous exciting new features and enhancements for Intel and AMD Radeon GPUs, they pushed another maintenance update to Mesa 17.2 to fix bugs, memory leaks, hangs, and other issues.

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