Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: NVIDIA/CUDA and Panfrost Gallium3D

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • CUDA, woulda … did: Nvidia makes CUDA 11 generally available, mostly pushing its next-gen architecture

    Developers who were excited by Nvidia’s May announcement of an upcoming CUDA release can finally hop over to the company’s dev portal to download version 11 of the parallel computing platform and programming model for GPUs.

    The number of those actually able to make the most of CUDA 11 seems to be comparatively small, given that its most notable features can be subsumed under support for the newest generation of Nvidia GPUs. The A100 is one example, built with the new Ampere architecture that should now work well with CUDA. It was developed to help compute some of the more complex tasks that can be found in the realms of AI, data analytics, and high-performance computing and is also central to the company’s data centre platform.

  • NVIDIA CUDA 11.0 Released With Ampere Support, New Programming Features

    NVIDIA appears to have quietly promoted CUDA 11.0 to its stable channel.

    CUDA 11.0 was announced back in May at the virtual GTC and release candidates subsequently available. On Tuesday though a reader tipped us off that the official CUDA 11.0 binaries are indeed now available. CUDA 11.0 downloads for Linux and Windows are available as always from developer.nvidia.com.

  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver Adds Midgard Multi-Sampling Support

    The Panfrost Gallium3D driver providing open-source OpenGL support for Arm Mali graphics hardware now has working multi-sample anti-aliasing (MSAA) for Arm Midgard hardware.

    Alyssa Rosenzweig has merged her work on supporting multi-sampling with Midgard using this reverse-engineered Gallium3D driver. This gets the driver close to the multi-sampling requirements mandated by the OpenGL ES 3.0 specification.

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT / Ryzen 7 3800XT / Ryzen 9 3900XT Linux Performance In 130+ Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

After the AMD Ryzen 3000XT series was announced last month, these new higher-clocked Zen 2 desktop processors are shipping today. Here are 130+ benchmarks on each of the Ryzen 5 3600XT, Ryzen 7 3800XT, and Ryzen 9 3900XT parts compared to various Intel and AMD CPUs. Tests under Ubuntu Linux and also complemented by performance-per-Watt / power and performance-per-dollar data points.

These "XT" processors were announced in mid-June as still being Zen 2 based like the rest of the Ryzen 3000 desktop line-up but with slight increases to the base and boost clock frequencies to ratchet up the competition on Intel's new Comet Lake processors.

Read more

Kernel: Peter Hutterer, ARM and Monado Work

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • User-specific XKB configuration - part 2

    Several moons have bypassed us [1] in the time since the first post, and Things Have Happened! If you recall (and of course you did because you just re-read the article I so conveniently linked above), libxkbcommon supports an include directive for the rules files and it will load a rules file from $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/xkb/rules/ which is the framework for custom per-user keyboard layouts. Alas, those files are just sitting there, useful but undiscoverable.

    To give you a very approximate analogy, the KcCGST format I described last time are the ingredients to a meal (pasta, mince, tomato). The rules file is the machine-readable instruction set to assemble your meal but it relies a lot on wildcards. Feed it "spaghetti, variant bolognese" and the actual keymap ends up being the various components put together: "pasta(spaghetti)+sauce(tomato)+mince". But for this to work you need to know that spag bol is available in the first place, i.e you need the menu. This applies to keyboard layouts too - the keyboard configuration panel needs to present a list so the users can clickedy click-click on whatever layout they think is best for them.

  • Linux 5.9 To Bring Arm Memory Tagging Extension Support

    The 64-bit ARM code building up for the Linux 5.9 cycle is set to mainline Memory Tagging Extension (MTE) support as another security improvement inbound.

    The Memory Tagging Extension (MTE) of the ARMv8.5-A specification is intended to help fend off potential memory safety violations that could lead to exploits of the system. MTE has the mechanism with supported hardware to detect the most common memory safety violations and can assist in detection of vulnerabilities.

  • Monado OpenXR Runtime Now Supports Multi-Application Rendering / Overlays

    The Monado open-source OpenXR runtime has seen a lot of features added this year and the most recent is support for OpenXR's XR_EXTX_overlay extension to allow for multi-application / overlay rendering.

    The XR_EXTX_overlay extension from LunarG, Epic Games, and Pluto VR is for allowing contents of separate OpenXR applications to be composited on top of the main OpenXR application. Some of the intended use-cases for this OpenXR overlay extension is for debug environments that may want to render metrics on top of the main window, showing a heads-up display (HUD), and exposing other panels on top of the main window/application being rendered. The extra applications are rendered in a separate process and then composited on top of the main application.

Linux Graphics and File Systems

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • DRM Scheduler Improvement, New Epoch Counter, Other DRM Work For Linux 5.9

    Following the drm-misc-next pull request to DRM-Next last week that exposes VRR ranges via DebugFS and other improvements, another round of DRM-Misc-Next material has now been sent in for queuing ahead of the Linux 5.9 cycle.

  • Frame-Buffer Compression Support For Vintage Intel i865 Graphics Revived

    Back in April I wrote about patches for enabling FBC on the Intel 865 chipset nearly two decades after that chipset first shipped. Those patches didn't yet hit the mainline Linux kernel but they were revived again this week.

    These patches are for enabling frame-buffer compression support on the Intel Extreme 2 Graphics found with the i865 "Springdale" chipset. Frame-buffer compression can yield performance and power efficiency advantages thanks to the reduced bandwidth. Newer generations of Intel graphics hardware have squared away their FBC support for a while but the i865 era support was overlooked until recent patches improving the state pushed it forward enough where it could finally be enabled by default.

  • Reiser5 Pursuing Selective File Migration For Moving Hot Files To High Performance Disks

    Edward Shishkin continues pursuing development of new file-system functionality for Reiser5, the next-generation evolutionary advancement over the controversial Reiser4 file-system.

    Reiser5 has been working on new features like local volumes with parallel scaling out, data tiering and burst buffers, and other new features. The latest feature being worked on by Shishkin for Reiser5 is selective file migration.

Linux Plumbers Conference Not Sold Out and Annual X.Org / Wayland / Mesa Conference Going Virtual

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Linux Plumbers Conference is Not Sold Out

    We’re really sorry, but apparently the Cvent registration site we use has suffered a bug which is causing it to mark the conference as “Sold Out” and, unfortunately, since today is the beginning of the American Independence day weekend, we can’t get anyone to fix it until Monday. However, rest assured there are plenty of places still available, so if you can wait until Monday, you should be able to register for the conference as soon as the site is fixed.

  • The Annual X.Org / Wayland / Mesa Conference Is Going Virtual Due To COVID-19

    XDC 20 was set to take place this September in Poland but is now moving to an online event as a result of the ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic. 

    The X.Org Foundation has decided to make XDC 2020 a virtual conference due to uncertainty over the COVID-19 situation come September in Europe. This will be the first time the annual X.Org Developers' Conference has been an entirely online event. 

    The announcement was made today as well as extending the call for presentations by an additional two weeks. 

Raspberry Pi 4's Vulkan Driver and More

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Alejandro Piñeiro: v3dv status update 2020-07-01

    Input attachment is one of the main sub-features for Vulkan multipass, and we’ve gained support since the announcement. On Vulkan the support for multipass is more tightly supported by the API. Renderpasses can have multiple subpasses. These can have dependencies between each other, and each subpass define a subset of “attachments”. One attachment that is easy to understand is the color attachment: This is where a given subpass writes a given color. Another, input attachment, is an attachment that was updated in a previous subpass (for example, it was the color attachment on such previous subpass), and you get as a input on following subpasses. From the shader POV, you interact with it as a texture, with some restrictions. One important restriction is that you can only read the input attachment at the current pixel location. The main reason for this restriction is because on tile-based GPUs (like rpi4) all primitives are batched on tiles and fragment processing is rendered one tile at a time. In general, if you can live with those restrictions, Vulkan multipass and input attachment will provide better performance than traditional multipass solutions.

    If you are interested in reading more details on this, you can check out ARM’s very nice presentation “Vulkan Multipass mobile deferred done right”, or Sascha Willems’ post “Vulkan input attachments and sub passes”. The latter also includes information about how to use them and code snippets of one of his demos. For reference, this is how the input attachment demos looks on the rpi4...

  • Raspberry Pi 4's Vulkan Driver Is Now More Usable - Supporting More Features

    The "V3DV" Vulkan driver being developed by Igalia under contract with the Raspberry Pi Foundation has offered a status update on this official driver for the Raspberry Pi 4.

    The V3DV effort is the modern, official Vulkan driver for the Raspberry Pi 4 and not to be confused with the third-party Vulkan driver for pre-RPi4 hardware or the former Raspberry Pi 4 Vulkan effort. This is the new driver being developed and what ultimately will be the official driver option moving forward.

  • Code Jetpac’s rocket building action | Wireframe #40

Graphics: Mesa, Mircade/Mir, Intel/DRM-Next and UBO Sighting

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa CI Optimization Could Provide Big Bandwidth Savings

    You may recall that earlier this year X.Org/FreeDesktop.org may have to cut CI services for developers over the cloud expenses associated with that continuous integration service for the likes of Mesa, the X.Org Server, and other components. CI usage was leading to a lot of bandwidth consumption so much so that the X.Org Foundation is facing potential ~70k USD cloud costs this year largely from their continuous integration setup.

    Since then there has been some work on better optimizing their continuous integration setup with Jenkins and within the latest Mesa Git is some further tuning.

  • A snap confined shell based on Mir: Mircade (or Mircade: An example snap confined user shell)

    There are various scenarios and reasons for packaging a Snap confined shell and a selection of applications together in a confined environment. You might have applications that work well together for a particular task; or, you may want to offer a number of alternative applications and have them available on a wide range of target platforms. Mircade illustrates this approach.

  • Intel Rocket Lake Graphics Support Ready For Liftoff With Linux 5.9

    Intel has sent in their initial batch of graphics driver updates to DRM-Next that in turn are slated to land with the Linux 5.9 cycle once its merge window opens next month.

    Most significant with this Intel DRM-Next pull is the introduction of Rocket Lake support, the Comet Lake successor that is said to be a still-14nm part but making it most exciting will be the replacement of the longstanding Gen9 graphics with Gen12 graphics. Back in May Intel posted the open-source Rocket Lake patches but came just too late for getting them reviewed/tested in time for Linux 5.8 and thus diverted for the 5.9 cycle.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: UBO Sighting

Graphics: Intel, Weston, NVIDIA and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel's IGC 1.0.4241 Graphics Compiler Adds DG1 Platform Support

    Significant with this new version of the IGC compiler is the DG1 platform is supported, their first graphics card. IGC already supported Gen12/Xe while now the initial bits are in place for the forthcoming DG1 discrete graphics card. For weeks now we've been seeing Intel's many open-source developers posting new DG1 enablement patches from the Linux kernel through their Mesa stack to the media encode/decode driver and now working its way into DG1 for their compute stack. Obviously you also need to be running on the future Linux 5.9 kernel and more for getting this DG1 support all aligned but at least the IGC side work is now in place.

  • Weston 9.0 release schedule
    Hi all,
    
    Here is the release schedule for Weston 9.0, the next major version:
    
    - Alpha: July 30th, in 4 weeks
    - Beta: August 13th
    - RC1: August 27th
    - First possible release: September 3rd
    
    Package maintainers are encouraged to pick up the pre-releases to make
    sure packaging can be tested (and fixed) before the stable release.
    
    Let me know if there's something in particular you want merged for 9.0.
    
    Thanks,
    
    Simon Ser
    
  • Wayland's Weston 9.0 Aims For Release In Early September

    With Weston 8.0 having shipped in January, Wayland developers are beginning to prepare for the next feature release of this reference Wayland compositor.

    Simon Ser has once again stepped up to take over Weston release management duties. He is planning to tag the Weston 9.0 Alpha at the end of June, a Weston 9.0 Beta in mid-August, and a first release candidate at the end of April. If all goes well he hopes to ship Weston 9.0 on 3 September but could be delayed by some days if additional release candidates are warranted.

  • LLVMpipe Gallium3D Driver Now Exposes OpenGL 4.0

    The LLVMpipe Gallium3D driver that provides a software/CPU-based OpenGL implementation for running on systems as a fallback path when no GPU / hardware OpenGL driver is available, a vendor-neutral path for debug purposes, and similar use-cases, now has OpenGL 4.0 support.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 10 Brings Few Changes For This Proprietary Library

    NVIDIA has quietly released Video Codec SDK 10 as the newest version of their proprietary video encode/decode implementation designed for their GPUs.

    [...]

    NVIDIA has already contributed to FFMpeg support for using the new NVENC presets, multi-pass encode modes, and low-delay key frame scaling for this video library as part of the Video Codec SDK 10 support. A follow-up commit added additional H.264 levels now supported.

  • RadeonSI Switches To Make Greater Wave64 Use On Navi

    While RDNA/Navi brought Wave32 support, the open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D driver for Linux has decided to switch to make greater use now of Wave64 for more shaders.

    [...]

    The change to use Wave64 for more shader stages was merged this week for Mesa 20.2. The commit does add the new "nggctess" perf flag for always using NGG culling for tessellation, complementing the existing nggc (for always using NGG culling) and nonggc for disabling NGG culling.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Binding Locations

    So let’s get down to pixels. The UBO indexing is now fixed-ish, which means moving onto the next step: setting up bindings for the UBOs.

    A binding in this context is the numeric id assigned to a UBO for the purposes of accessing it from a shader, which also corresponds to the uniform block index. In mesa, this is the struct nir_variable::data.binding member of a UBO. A load_ubo instruction will take this value as its first parameter, which means there’s a need to ensure that everything matches up just right.

Benchmarking The Performance Overhead To LKRG 0.8 For Better Security

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Back in March I benchmarked the Linux Kernel Runtime Guard (LKRG) as a means of achieving additional security safeguards for a ~5% performance hit. With LKRG 0.8 having been released a few days ago, here is a fresh look at the LKRG performance compared to the stock kernel on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

LKRG adds runtime integrity checking to the Linux kernel and other runtime detection of security exploits. LKRG 0.8 was released last week and the focus of our latest benchmarking. LKRG 0.8 adds new safeguards as well as support for newer kernel builds, experimental 32-bit ARM and Raspberry Pi support, new tunables, and other changes.

Read more

Graphics: Khronos, AMD, Nir and Monado

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Khronos Releases SYCL 2020 Provisional Specification

    The Khronos Group has announced the provisional specification of SYCL 2020 as the newest version of this higher-level programming model originally designed for OpenCL that is based on pure single-source C++.

    The SYCL 2020 provisional specification is available today and is now based on C++17 where as formerly SYCL had been based on C++11. SYCL 2020 is also bringing new programming abstractions like unified shared memory, group algorithms, sub-groups, and other features.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q2.6 Brings More Performance Tuning

    The AMD Radeon Vulkan driver developers are ending out June by shipping their sixth open-source snapshot of the quarter.

    With AMDVLK 2020.Q2.6, there are continued performance tuning/optimization efforts. There has been performance tuning going on to benefit Ghost Recon Breakpoint and Zombie Army 4: Dead War under Wine / Steam Play. There is also improved pipeline compiler performance with this Vulkan driver update.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Nirly There

    In yesterday’s post, I left off in saying that removing an assert() from the constant block index check wasn’t going to work quite right. Let’s see why that is.

  • Monado: Multi application support with XR_EXTX_overlay

    By implementing this extension we are exposing Monado's multi application support, which was recently merged to master.

    In the video below you can see Monado compositing the rendering of Blender's VR view and the xrgears demo displaying a XrCompositionLayerProjection as overlay. The demo also showcases Monado's ability to deal with multiple graphics APIs as Blender uses OpenGL and xrgears Vulkan to submit its frames.

    To enable the extension in xrgears only this small change was required, which enables the XR_EXTX_overlay extension and passes the XrSessionCreateInfoOverlayEXTX struct to the graphics bindings `next` field.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

KDE Frameworks 5.73 Released with Many Changes to Breeze Icons, Kirigami and KNewStuff

KDE Frameworks 5.73 is a monthly update to the open-source software suite, but it packs a lot of interesting changes. For example, the Kirigami UI builder received a new FlexColumn component and now supports action visibility in the GlobalDrawer, along with optimizations to the mobile layout and to the accessibility of the Kirigami input fields. The Breeze icon theme saw a lot of changes too during the development cycle of KDE Frameworks 5.73, and it now comes with a bunch of new icons for Kontrast, kirigami-gallery, snap-angle, document-replace, SMART status, task-recurring, appointment-recurring, Overwrite action/button, and applications/pkcs12 mime type. Read more

Redo Rescue Backup and Recovery Live System Gets NFS Share Support, SSH Server

For those not in the know, Redo Rescue is a great, free and easy to use live Linux system based on Debian GNU/Linux that can help you whenever your computer is broken by letting you backup and restore an entire system in just a few minutes. For example, if your computer no longer boots after installing the recent BootHole patches for the GRUB2 bootloader, you can use Redo Rescue to repair the boot. Of course, there are a few other tools that can do the same, but Redo Rescue can also do bare metal restores by replacing the MBR and partition table, re-map original data to a different target partition and even verify the integrity of an existing backup image. Read more

Pocket P.C. design files released as open source (handheld Linux computer)

The Popcorn Computers Pocket P.C. is designed to be a handheld Linux computer with a 4.95 inch full HD display, a built-in keyboard, and a ARM Cortex-A53 quad-core processor. First unveiled in November 2019, the Pocket P.C. hasn’t shipped yet. It’s still up for pre-order for $199 and up. But the developers have already open sourced the hardware by releasing the latest design files. You can find the at the project’s GitHub page. Read more