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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support

    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch.

    The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.

  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support

    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support.

    Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.

  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5

    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.

  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year

    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.

GPUVis in the News

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux and Graphics: Linux Weather Forecast, DRM, XDC2017, Mesa, and NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Weather Forecast

    This page is an attempt to track ongoing developments in the Linux development community that have a good chance of appearing in a mainline kernel and/or major distributions sometime in the near future. Your "chief meteorologist" is Jonathan Corbet, Executive Editor at LWN.net. If you have suggestions on improving the forecast (and particularly if you have a project or patchset that you think should be tracked), please add your comments below.

  • A New DRM Driver Is Coming For Linux 4.15

    TVE200 is a new Direct Rendering Manager driver being queued for Linux 4.15.

    The TVE200 DRM driver is for the Faraday Tech TVE200 "TV encoder" block. This mini driver was written by Linus Walleij of Linaro.

  • XDC2017 Kicks Off With X.Org, Wayland & Graphics Talks

    The X.Org Developers Conference kicked off a short time ago at the Googleplex in Mountain View, CA. But even if you are not at the event, there is a livestream.

  • Mesa Sees An Initial Meson Build System Port

    A few months ago was a vibrant discussion about a Meson proposal for libdrm/Mesa while today the initial patches were posted in bringing a possible Meson build system port for Mesa.

  • NVIDIA Offers Update On Their Proposed Unix Device Memory Allocation Library

    James Jones of NVIDIA presented this morning at XDC2017 with their annual update on a new Unix device memory allocation library. As a reminder, this library originated from NVIDIA's concerns over the Generic Buffer Manager (GBM) currently used by Wayland compositors not being suitable for use with their driver's architecture and then the other driver developers not being interested in switching to EGLStreams, NVIDIA's original push for supporting Wayland.

  • NVIDIA Legacy Linux Drivers Updated With Newer Kernel Support

    NVIDIA has issued new releases of its two legacy drivers for Linux.

    The NVIDIA 340.104 driver is now available for older Tesla architecture graphics processors while the NVIDIA 304.137 is out for the GeForce 6 and GeForce 7 generations.

AMD Threadripper 1950X on Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Early Linux 4.14 Kernel Benchmarks Are Looking Promising

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

I've begun running some Linux 4.14-rc1 kernel benchmarks and in some areas there appears to be nice gains with this in-development kernel.

If you are behind on your Phoronix reading and don't know about all of the changes coming for this next kernel release -- which will also be an LTS kernel -- see our Linux 4.14 feature overview that was published this past weekend.

Here are just some very early benchmarks while more are on the way.

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Kernel: Next Linux kernel 4.13 RC, the Linux Foundation and Graphics News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Development of Linux Kernel 4.14, the Next LTS Release

    A day early than expected, Linux creator Linus Torvalds cautiously kicked off the development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series, which looks to be the next LTS (Long Term Support) branch, with the first Release Candidate (RC) milestone.

    That's right, two weeks after the release of Linux kernel 4.13, which is currently the most stable and advanced kernel series, being adopted by more and more GNU/Linux distributions each day, the first RC development snapshot of Linux kernel 4.14 is ready for public testing, officially closing the merge window. And it looks like some core new functionality will be implemented in this release.

  • Linux Foundation wants to promote sustainable open source development with new initiatives

    During last week’s Open Source Summit North America in Los Angeles, the Linux Foundation announced a series of projects designed to promote sustainability and growth in open source development.

    We wrote last week about their “Open Source Guides for the Enterprise,” which will see a series of guides by professionals from many different organizations released over the next few months.

    Following that, the foundation announced the Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software, or CHAOSS, project. With CHAOSS, the Linux Foundation wants to provide a platform for measuring and analyzing open source projects.

    The foundation also announced that it has granted a CII security badge to 100 projects through a voluntary process for open source projects to prove their security measures stack up professionally.

  • Intel ANV Lands New Vulkan 1.0.61 Extensions, Android Prep Support
  • AMDGPU Increasing Fragment Size For Performance

    Christian König of AMD yesterday sent out an AMDGPU kernel patch for boosting the default fragment size for GCN graphics cards pre-Vega.

    The patch is quite trivial and is for boosting the default fragment size from 64KB to 2MB, similar to the move made with the latest Vega GPUs. This change is for GFX6/GFX7/GFX8 graphics processors or basically all the GCN cards prior to Vega "GFX9".

Devices/Hardware: Embedded/Boards, CODESYS, and EPYC Linux Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux friendly IoT gateway runs on 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC

    While the MB-80580 SBC lists SATA II, the gateway indicates SATA III. Also, the gateway datasheet notes that the RS232 ports can all be redirected to RS232/422/485. Software includes Windows IoT Core and Server, as well as Yocto, Ubuntu Snappy Core, and CentOS Linux distributions.

  • Rugged panel PC scales up to a 19-inch touchscreen

    The fanless, IP65-rated WinSystems “PPC65B-1x” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 10.4 to 19-inch resistive touchscreens.

  • CODESYS announces CODESYS-compatible SoftPLC for open Linux device platforms
  • EPYC Linux performance from AMD

    Phoronix have been hard at work testing out AMD's new server chip, specifically the 2.2/2.7/3.2GHz EPYC 7601 with 32 physical cores.  The frequency numbers now have a third member which is the top frequency all 32 cores can hit simultaneously, for this processor that would be 2.7GHz.  Benchmarking server processors is somewhat different from testing consumer CPUs, gaming performance is not as important as dealing with specific productivity applications.   Phoronix started their testing of EPYC, in both NUMA and non-NUMA configurations, comparing against several Xeon models and the performance delta is quite impressive, sometimes leaving even a system with dual Xeon Gold 6138's in the dust.  They also followed up with a look at how EPYC compares to Opteron, AMD's last server offerings.  The evolution is something to behold.

  • Opteron vs. EPYC Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Watt: How AMD Server Performance Evolved Over 10 Years

    By now you have likely seen our initial AMD EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarks. If you haven't, check them out, EPYC does really deliver on being competitive with current Intel hardware in the highly threaded space. If you have been curious to see some power numbers on EPYC, here they are from the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Making things more interesting are some comparison benchmarks showing how the AMD EPYC performance compares to AMD Opteron processors from about ten years ago.

Games and Graphics: Chopper: Lethal darkness, Banshee, RadeonSI and Mir

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Take out enemies from an attack helicopter using an FLIR camera in Chopper: Lethal darkness
  • Banshee Engine Planning For Linux Support In Q4

    Banshee has been a promising C++14-written, multi-threaded open-source game engine featuring Vulkan support. When the Vulkan support was added at the start of the year the plan was to see the Linux support added to the game engine in Q2. Well, it looks like in Q4 we could see the Linux client finally materialize.

    For those that have been wondering about the Linux support for Banshee, the engine's roadmap now reflects a plan to add Linux support in Q4. Meanwhile, the engine's 1.0 beta release is planned for early 2018.

  • RadeonSI OoO Rasterization Lands In Mesa 17.3 For RX Vega & VI GPUs

    The RadeonSI out-of-order rasterization support for RX Vega "GFX9" and Volcanic Islands GPUs has now landed in Mesa 17.3-devel Git.

    The out-of-order rasterization support should be able to boost the performance of these newer graphics cards in some Linux games. The support is enabled by default for now on Vega/VI GPUs while can be disabled with R600_DEBUG=nooutoforder.

  • Mir Now Has Initial Support For Wayland Clients

    Quietly being added to the Mir display stack a week ago was initial support for Wayland clients.

    Natively supporting Wayland clients within Mir has been a new goal for the remaining Mir developers at Canonical now that the original Mir plans were abandoned when Canonical did away with their grand vision for Unity 8. Mir is still being maintained at Canonical for some IoT use-cases while they hope some open-source projects will still decide to make use of their technology. With now at least having native Wayland client support, they stand some chance of Mir being useful to other groups.

Mesa 17.2.1 Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux RAID Performance On NVMe M.2 SSDs With EXT4, Btrfs, F2FS

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Graphics/Benchmarks

To little surprise, when starting things off with a SQLite database insertion test, EXT4 on RAID0 with the NVMe drives was the fastest but not much faster than the standalone MP500 on EXT4. F2FS was also competing very well with EXT4. Btrfs was the slowest file-system, due to its copy-on-write nature that by default it doesn't tend to be as performant with database type workloads. Interestingly, using F2FS with RAID1 caused a significant performance regression. At least in all the configurations except Btrfs, using the Corsair MP500 NVMe drives were a big upgrade over the Samsung 850 PRO.

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: Containers, 'Cloud', Microservices, and Hyperledger

  • How to Choose a Linux Container Image
    A comparison of Linux container images talks about the best-practices in choosing an image. Architecture, security and performance are among the factors, while commercial users would also look for support options. A Linux container allows separate management of kernel space and user space components by utilizing cgroups and namespaces, which are resource and process isolation mechanisms. Solaris and BSD also have abstractions similar to Linux containers but the article's focus is on the latter only. The host running the container has the operating system kernel and a set of libraries and tools required to run containers. The container image, on the other hand, has the libraries, interpreters and application code required to run the application that is being distributed in the container. These depend on underlying system libraries. This is true for interpreted languages too as the interpreters themselves are written in low level languages.
  • The Four Pillars of Cloud-Native Operations
    As organizations shift their application strategies to embrace the cloud-native world, the purpose of the cloud transitions from saving money to delivering and managing applications. Platforms such as Cloud Foundry, Kubernetes, and Docker redefine the possibilities for application environments that utilize the cloud. It’s time for us as operations professionals to rethink how we approach our jobs in this new world. We should be asking, how do our organizations take advantage of cloud-native as a new mode of application delivery?
  • How to align your team around microservices
    Microservices have been a focus across the open source world for several years now. Although open source technologies such as Docker, Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Swarm make it easier than ever for organizations to adopt microservice architectures, getting your team on the same page about microservices remains a difficult challenge. For a profession that stresses the importance of naming things well, we've done ourselves a disservice with microservices. The problem is that that there is nothing inherently "micro" about microservices. Some can be small, but size is relative and there's no standard measurement unit across organizations. A "small" service at one company might be 1 million lines of code, but far fewer at another organization.
  • Hyperledger Stitches in Another Blockchain Project
    The Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Project, which works on blockchain technologies, added a sixth sub project — this one dubbed Quilt. Hyperledger Quilt started around 18 months ago and is an implementation of the Interledger Protocol (ILP), which helps facilitate transactions across ledgers.
  • Chinese Search Giant Baidu Joins Hyperledger Blockchain Consortium
    Chinese search engine giant Baidu has become the latest member of the Linux Foundation-led Hyperledger blockchain consortium. In joining the group – which focuses on developing blockchain technologies for enterprises – Baidu will assist the project's efforts alongside other member companies including Accenture, IBM, JP Morgan, R3, Cisco and SAP, among others.

Games: Steam Sale, Skirmish Line, Maia, Observer

Canonical on Path to IPO as Ubuntu Unity Linux Desktop Gets Ditched

In October 2010, Mark Shuttleworth, founder of the Ubuntu open-source operating system and CEO of Canonical, announced his grand plan to build a converged Linux desktop that would work on mobile devices, desktops and even TVs. He called the effort "Unity" and poured significant financial resources into it. Seven years later, the Unity dream is dead. On Oct. 19, Ubuntu 17.10 was released as the first Ubuntu Linux version since 2010 that didn't use Unity as the default Linux desktop. In a video interview with eWEEK, Shuttleworth details the rationale behind his decision to cancel Unity and why he has now put his company on the path toward an initial public offering (IPO). Because Ubuntu has moved into the mainstream in a bunch of areas, including the cloud, he said some of the things his company had been doing were never going to be commercially sustainable. Read more Also: Ubuntu 17.10 delivers new desktop and cloud enhancements

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