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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics Leftovers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • QEMU's Assortment Of Virtual VGA/GPU Options & What To Pick For Desktop Virtualization

    The virtual GPU/display landscape particularly for having accelerated guest graphics was once non-existent and then suffering for the open-source Linux virtualization stack around QEMU, but that is no longer the case. There are options these days to rival the GPU/display offerings of VirtualBox and VMware albeit to newcomers may not be so clear.

    Longtime QEMU/virtualization developer Gerd Hoffmann has written a blog post outlining the VGA/display devices for QEMU and the recommended options. The options he covers at length include the standard VGA device, Bochs display device, VirtIO VGA, VirtIO GPU, Vhost-user VirtIO GPU, QXL VGA, QXL, Cirrua VGA, ATI VGA, and RAMFB.

  • Intel's Inaugural Release Of OpenVKL Ties Into Their Promising oneAPI Rendering Toolkit

    While announced some months ago, today in-step with the OSPray 2.0 Alpha ray-tracing release is the inaugural development release of the Open Volume Kernel Library (OpenVKL).

    Intel's Open Volume Kernel Library is a set of volume computation kernels optimized for AVX/AVX2/AVX-512 and leverages their SPMD Program Compiler. OpenVKL ties into Intel's other open-source render components like OSPray for what will form their oneAPI rendering tool-kit. We're now in Q4 and that is when the beta release of Intel's oneAPI is expected.

  • LuxCoreRender 2.2 Released With Intel Open Image Denoise Yields Faster Render Times

    LuxCoreRender, the open-source physically based renderer for execution on CPUs as well as OpenCL accelerators / GPUs, is out with version 2.2 and now integrates Intel's open-source Open Image Denoise.

    LuxCoreRender already made use of Intel's Embree library (as happened to be covered this morning with benchmark results in The Xeon vs. EPYC Performance With Intel's oneAPI Embree & OSPray Render Projects) while now they have also pulled in Intel's Open Image Denoise.

  • Unofficial Radeon ROCm Packages Re-Enable APU Support

    Over a year ago the AMD APU support in the Radeon Open Compute (ROCm) stack was quietly removed and has yet to be re-enabled in the upstream ROCm packages. But should you be wanting to use ROCm for their compute APIs or OpenCL on APUs, unofficial Ubuntu packages are now available to provide this capability.

    Engineering firm Bruhnpace AB has resorted to providing their own ROCm packages for Ubuntu 18.04 with AMD APU support enabled to make up for AMD's lack of official packages handling APUs in the different ROCm libraries. The repository doesn't provide its own rocm-dkms package but rather recommends users run the latest upstream kernels for the AMDKFD kernel driver support.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.0.1 Available Along With Several New/Updated Test Profiles

    As a minor update following last month's Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 release, version 9.0.1 is now available and also for all PTS users are a number of new/updated test profiles via OpenBenchmarking.org.

AMD Navi 12 Gets 256-bit memory bus according to Linux drivers, Radeon RX 5600 128-bit

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

A lot has been said and spoken already about AMD's upcoming NAVI 12 (RX 5600) and 14 (RX 5500). More information from Linux drivers indicates that AMD Navi 12 gets a 256-bit memory bus and the RX 5600 128-bit, likely GDDR6.

The news arrives today though a user at Germany based 3DCenter forums called Berniyh, he found Navi 12 and Navi 14 in Linux drivers, the two GPUs could end up in the RX 5800 and RX 5600 cards respectively. Navi 12 is mentioned to get a 256-bit memory bus. Navi 14 would, according to previously surfaced drivers, get versions with 3, 4 and 8 GB volume graphics memory but on a 128-bit memory bus.

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Phoronix: IO_uring, Speculative Execution, Encode/Decode Benchmark

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • IO_uring Is More Polished With Linux 5.4

    Added back during the Linux 5.1 cycle was IO_uring for fast and efficient I/O. This new interface allows for queue rings to be shared between the application and kernel to avoid excess copies and other efficiency improvements over the existing Linux AIO code. With Linux 5.4, IO_uring is in even better shape.

    In the months since IO_uring was merged to mainline, we've seen a ton of continued work on it including the likes of a 755x performance improvement. With Linux 5.4, it seems following extensive optimizations by Jens Axboe and others, it's in quite a polished shape.

  • It Turns Out CPU Speculative Execution Can Be Useful For Random Entropy / RNG

    While CPU speculative execution has caused a lot of frustrations over the past two years due to the likes of the Spectre vulnerabilities, it turns out CPU speculative execution can be exploited to be a viable source of random entropy for random number generators.

    Particularly on newer Intel/AMD CPU microarchitectures where speculative execution is much more advanced than hardware from years ago, it's been found that measuring the execution time of loops relying upon speculation is random enough to be a cheap and speedy source of entropy.

    [...]

    Linus Torvalds commented and he believes that this is not very reliable and a simple jitter entropy implementation. But he did post his own proof-of-concept code for improving the jitter entropy code based upon this.

  • Fresh Video Encode/Decode Benchmark Numbers For Xeon Platinum 8280 vs. EPYC 7742

    Given recent updates to the Intel Scalable Video Technology (SVT) open-source video encoders as well as other open-source video encoders/decoders, here is a fresh look at the performance of the AMD EPYC 7742 2P server against the Intel competition with the dual Xeon Platinum 8280.

Peter Bengtsson: How much faster is Redis at storing a blob of JSON compared to PostgreSQL?

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Server
OSS

First of all, I'm still a PostgreSQL fan-boy and have no intention of ceasing that. These times are made up of much more than just the individual databases. For example, the PostgreSQL speeds depend on the Django ORM code that makes the SQL and sends the query and then turns it into the model instance. I don't know what the proportions are between that and the actual bytes-from-PG's-disk times. But I'm not sure I care either. The tooling around the database is inevitable mostly and it's what matters to users.

Both Redis and PostgreSQL are persistent and survive server restarts and crashes etc. And you get so many more "batch related" features with PostgreSQL if you need them, such as being able to get a list of the last 10 rows added for some post-processing batch job.

I'm currently using Django's cache framework, with Redis as its backend, and it's a cache framework. It's not meant to be a persistent database. I like the idea that if I really have to I can just flush the cache and although detrimental to performance (temporarily) it shouldn't be a disaster. So I think what I'll do is store these JSON blobs in both databases. Yes, it means roughly 6GB of SSD storage but it also potentially means loading a LOT more into RAM on my limited server. That extra RAM usage pretty much sums of this whole blog post; of course it's faster if you can rely on RAM instead of disk. Now I just need to figure out how RAM I can afford myself for this piece and whether it's worth it.

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DXVK 1.4.1 Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Initial Benchmarks Of CentOS 8.0 & CentOS Stream On Intel Xeon / AMD EPYC

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With this week's release of the much anticipated CentOS 8.0 as the community/free rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 as well as the surprise announcement of the bleeding-edge, rolling-release CentOS Stream, we have begun benchmarking these enterprise Linux distribution releases. Up today are our first tests of CentOS 7.7 against CentOS 8.0 and the early CentOS Stream state on Intel Xeon Cascadelake and AMD EPYC Rome servers.

This is just the first of our CentOS 8.0 benchmarks over the past few days with more performance tests being worked on, including a cross-distribution comparison of the enterprise Linux x86_64 distributions and more. But for ending out the week, here is an initial look at the CentOS 8.0 performance for those that may be using the weekend downtime for upgrading from CentOS 7.

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Linux: VirtIO-FS and Intel

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • VirtIO-FS Sent In For Linux 5.4 With Better Performance Over VirtIO-9P

    VirtIO-FS as a better approach for sharing folders/files with guest VMs is set to debut in Linux 5.4.

    VirtIO-FS makes use of FUSE and is much faster than virtio-8p that serves a similar purpose for sharing folders/files between the host and guest virtual machines. Directories can be exported from the host and mounted by the guest with VirtIO-FS and is effectively the "glue" between FUSE and VirtIO.

  • UDOO X86 II SBC Combines Intel Braswell SoC with Microchip ATMega32U4 “Arduino” MCU

    UDOO X86 development board was first introduced in a crowdfunding campaign in 2016 with a quad-core Intel Braswell processor coupled with an Arduino 101 compatible Intel Curie module for real-time I/O processing.

    Early July of next year (2019) the Intel processor and module seems to be going so well and have a bright future together with UDOO X86 board and accessories becoming broadly available. But life can be cruel at times, and Intel announced their plan to discontinue Intel Curie and other IoT projects just a few weeks later with the last shipment scheduled for July 2018.

  • Intel's Mesa Drivers Point To Even More Comet Lake Parts

    There were already 18 new PCI IDs for Intel's open-source OpenGL/Vulkan Linux graphics drivers for forthcoming Comet Lake processors with UHD Graphics, but now it appears there are even more models en route.

    As of Wednesday, three more PCI IDs were added for Comet Lake, making more than 20 different PCI IDs for graphics on Comet Lake processors. Granted, some of the PCI IDs are reserved for pre-production models / engineering samples or otherwise reserved for possible future revisions that aren't necessarily planned for market at this time, but either way it's a lot.

NVIDIA RTX 2060 / 2070 / 2080 SUPER Linux Gaming Performance - 26 GPUs Benchmarked

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Graphics/Benchmarks

We finally have our hands on NVIDIA's current RTX 20 SUPER graphics card line-up and have been putting the RTX 2060/2070/2080 SUPER cards through their paces under Linux. For the first of our long awaited NVIDIA RTX SUPER Linux benchmarks, first up is a look at the Linux gaming performance under a variety of native OpenGL/Vulkan games as well as Steam Play (DXVK+Proton) titles while testing a total of 26 graphics cards this round on the very latest AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce drivers.

Back in July NVIDIA announced the first three RTX SUPER graphics cards as refreshed Turing parts for better positioning against AMD's Radeon RX 5700 Navi line-up. The SUPER variants offer double digit percentage improvements over the earlier Turing cards, the RTX 2060 SUPER has an extra 2GB of GDDR6 video memory (8GB total), and more competitive pricing.

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Mesa 19.2.0 Release

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 19.2.0 Release Notes / 2019.09.25

    Mesa 19.2.0 is a new development release. People who are concerned with stability and reliability should stick with a previous release or wait for Mesa 19.2.1.

    Mesa 19.2.0 implements the OpenGL 4.5 API, but the version reported by glGetString(GL_VERSION) or glGetIntegerv(GL_MAJOR_VERSION) / glGetIntegerv(GL_MINOR_VERSION) depends on the particular driver being used. Some drivers don't support all the features required in OpenGL 4.5. OpenGL 4.5 is only available if requested at context creation. Compatibility contexts may report a lower version depending on each driver.

    Mesa 19.2.0 implements the Vulkan 1.1 API, but the version reported by the apiVersion property of the VkPhysicalDeviceProperties struct depends on the particular driver being used.

  • Mesa 19.2 Released With Navi Support, Much Improved Intel Gallium3D

    After a month worth of delays, Mesa 19.2 is now officially available as the latest quarterly feature update to this collection of open-source graphics driver components.

  • Mesa 19.2 released to push open source graphics drivers

    A few months after the last release, Mesa 19.2 is officially available today pushing open source GPU drivers to new heights.

    Since this is a major release, as the developers note you might want to wait for the first point release (19.2.1) to clear up any nuisance issues as it sees more testing.

The Power Efficiency Between Ubuntu 19.04, Clear Linux & openSUSE Tumbleweed With CompuLab's Airtop 3

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With CompuLab's incredibly well engineered Airtop 3 fan-less computer that is built to meet rugged industrial requirements while being loaded with an 8-core/16-thread Xeon CPU, NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 graphics, 64GB of RAM, and NVMe solid-state storage, here is an interesting benchmark comparison of Ubuntu 19.04, Clear Linux, and openSUSE Tumbleweed. Given the interesting system under test, not only is the raw performance being looked at but also the performance-per-Watt / AC power consumption and CPU thermal differences between these Linux operating systems.

The CompuLab Airtop 3 review sample as a reminder was loaded with a Xeon E-2288G 8-core / 16-thread CPU, 64GB of RAM, NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 graphics (using the proprietary NVIDIA Linux driver throughout all the tests considering the otherwise poor Turing state for Nouveau), and a 250GB Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe SSD all while being passively cooled.

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Android Leftovers

Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 18.04 and 16.04 LTS

Affecting both the Linux 4.15 kernel used in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04.6 LTS (Xenial Xerus) systems, the new security patch fixed an improperly implemented Spectre mitigation in the ptrace susbsystem (CVE-2019-15902), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. It also addresses a buffer overread (CVE-2019-15918) discovered that the SMB networking file system implementation, which could allow an attacker to expose sensitive information (kernel memory), two flaws (CVE-2019-15117 and CVE-2019-15118) discovered in the USB audio driver that may allow a physically proximate attacker to crash the system, and a flaw (CVE-2019-14821) in the KVM hypervisor implementation that let a local attacker to crash the system. Read more

Leftovers: MX-19, Versalogic and Security

  • MX-19 “patito feo” released!

    We are pleased to offer MX-19 for your use. As usual, this iso includes the latest updates from debian 10.1 (buster), antiX and MX repos.

  • Compact Apollo Lake SBC aims sky high

    Versalogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Harrier” SBC has an Apollo Lake processor and a compact 95 x 55mm footprint, ECC RAM support, and ruggedization features designed for high altitude UAVs. Versalogic announced a Harrier SBC due in Q1 2020 that revises the compact, COM-and-carrier design of its three-year-old, Intel Bay Trail based Osprey, but advances to the newer Intel Apollo Lake. The Osprey is similarly bereft of real-world ports to enable easier real-world deployments in constrained environments.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (jss and kernel), Debian (libpcap, openjdk-8, and tcpdump), Fedora (java-11-openjdk), openSUSE (libreoffice), Oracle (java-1.7.0-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.7.0-openjdk, python, and wget), Scientific Linux (java-1.7.0-openjdk), SUSE (ceph, ceph-iscsi, ses-manual_en, dhcp, openconnect, and procps), and Ubuntu (exiv2, linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-hwe, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-gke-5.0, linux-snapdragon, and uw-imap).

  • Password lessons: Longer is better, so is salt

    Infosec pros who had no idea of how easily a stolen list of hashed passwords could be cracked got a sobering lesson at this month’s SecTor security conference in Toronto. There, Will Hunt, co-founder of the U.K. based In.security consulting firm, casually talked of systems that can be built around a common (about $1,500) Nvidea GTX 2080 graphics card that could make 100 billion guesses a second in a brute force attack.

Unix Celebrates 50 Years

Today and tomorrow Nokia Bell Labs is hosting a two-day event celebrating 50 years of the Unix operating system, reflecting on Unix’s past and exploring the future of computing. Speakers and panelists include many of the original team that built Unix and designed the C programming language. Read more