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Graphics/Benchmarks

Phoronix on Graphics, Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • VirGL Now Capable Of OpenGL 4.1 With Latest Mesa

    The VirGL stack for offering OpenGL hardware acceleration to guest virtual machines with KVM is now capable of utilizing OpenGL 4.1.

    David Airlie who has been leading the VirGL cause the past few years for OpenGL support within VMs has got the code to the stage of OpenGL 4.1 support. The last big ticket item was supporting ARB_gpu_shader_fp64.

  • Vulkan 1.1.77 Released With Clarifications & Fixes

    Kicking off a new week is the Vulkan 1.1.77 specification update.

  • A Look At How The AMD EPYC Linux Performance Has Evolved Over The Past Year

    This month marks one year since AMD returned to delivering high-performance server CPUs with the debut of their EPYC 7000 series processor line-up. It's been a triumphant period for AMD with the successes over the past year of their EPYC family. Over the past year, the Linux support has continued to improve with several EPYC/Zen CPU optimizations, ongoing Zen compiler tuning, CPU temperature monitoring support within the k10temp driver, and general improvements to the Linux kernel that have also helped out EPYC. In this article is a comparison of a "2017" Linux software stack as was common last year to the performance now possible if using the bleeding-edge software components. These Linux benchmarks were done with the EPYC 7351P, 7401P, and 7601 processors.

Early PHP 7.3 Performance Benchmarks Are Looking Good

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Development
Graphics/Benchmarks

Released this week was the first alpha of PHP 7.3 and I decided to take it for a spin with some benchmarks. While not as dramatic as going from PHP5 to PHP 7.0, the performance of PHP7 continues getting better.

PHP 7.3 so far introduces several new functions, finally drops support for BeOS, updates the bundled SQLite version, expands WebP support, improves PHP garbage collection, and other enhancements. PHP 7.3 is tentatively planned for release at the end of November while over the months ahead are more alphas/betas/RCs.

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AMD and Linux 4.18

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Ships Latest Fixes, Optimizations

    The AMD Radeon driver developers maintaining the open-source AMDVLK Vulkan Linux driver have pushed out their latest week's worth of changes.

    On Friday was their usual push of the latest LLVM/XGL/PAL code-bases making up this Radeon Vulkan open-source driver that is an alternative to the Mesa-based RADV driver.

  • Linux 4.18 Gets AMD Patches For Speculative Store Bypass / Spectre V4

    Linux 4.17 landed the initial Spectre V4 mitigation as "Speculative Store Bypass Disable" (SSBD) while primarily focused on Intel CPUs and for Linux 4.18 the SSBD code has been updated for AMD processors.

    The in-development Linux 4.18 kernel will receive the patches for making use of the SPEC_CTRL / VIRT_SPEC MSRs to be provided by future AMD CPUs / firmware updates. The AMD SSBD work done by Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk of Oracle was previously covered here. The AMD SSBD whitepaper can be read here.

  • Linux 4.18 Landing Restartable Sequences System Call, Yields Performance Benefits

    Adding to the list of new features for Linux 4.18 is the long-in-development work on the restartable sequences system call.

    The new RSEQ system call allows for faster user-space operations on per-CPU data by providing a shared data structure ABI between each user-space thread and the kernel. This allows update operations on per-CPU data without needing expensive atomic operations. The restartable sequences ABI can make faster querying the current CPU number, incrementing per-CPU counters, modifying data protected by per-CPU spinlocks, writing/reading per-CPU ring buffers, and more.

Linux: Wacom, Linux 4.18, RADV Vulkan, X.Org Moving To GitLab

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Coming Soon: Wacom Firmware Updates on Linux

    Red Hat’s Richard Hughes shares word on work he’s done with Wacom engineers to support Wacom’s custom update protocol on Linux.

    At present, Wacom advise their customers to upgrade firmware on their graphics tablets using a dedicated desktop app which is only available for Windows and macOS.

    But no longer will open source creatives need to keep a dual-boot handy for this purpose.

  • A Look At The Features Merged So Far For The Linux 4.18 Kernel

    We are about half-way through the Linux 4.18 kernel merge window, so here is a look at the most interesting work that's been merged so far for this next kernel release that should debut as stable around mid-August.

    In the first week of the Linux 4.18 merge window, highlights include:

    - The big platter of DRM graphics driver updates always has us most excited and it's no different with Linux 4.18 from AMDGPU improvements to Intel Icelake work to NVIDIA Volta open-source enablement.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Should Now Work Much Better With DXVK For Direct3D 11 Wine Gaming

    For those relying upon DXVK for running Direct3D 11 games over Vulkan with Wine, the RADV Vulkan driver from Mesa Git should now be working out much better for this fast-developing graphics translation layer.

    DXVK continues making great strides for delivering a performant D3D11-over-Vulkan implementation for Wine games/applications. For those using the open-source Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver in Mesa 17.2-dev, the experience should be much more pleasant.

  • X.Org To Proceed Migrating Their Code & Bugs To GitLab

    Red Hat's Adam Jackson has announced the X.Org plans for the GitLab migration. X.Org will make use of GitLab for the Git repositories and bug tracking, as a replacement to Cgit and Bugzilla.

A Closer Look At The GeForce GTX 1060 vs. Radeon RX 580 In Thrones of Britannia

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

As it stands right now the most competitive graphics card battle on the Linux gaming front is the Radeon RX 580 against the GeForce GTX 1060. NVIDIA continues with their first-rate performant drivers while the Polaris hardware on the open-source RADV/RadeonSI drivers is mature enough now that it's competing with the GTX 1060 like it should be and in some cases even performing much better than the NVIDIA Pascal part. With this week's release of Thrones of Britannia and powered by Vulkan, here is an extensive look at the two competing GPUs and their performance.

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Wayland Remote Desktop May Come To Fedora 29

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

The latest feature plan for Fedora 29 is to finally have Wayland remote desktop support in place.

This Wayland Remote Desktop goal would be to have the same features and support as Fedora currently offers under X11 sessions for desktop sharing/remote access. This would allow Fedora Workstation sessions on Wayland to be accessible via VNC with authentication/authorization/encryption support. This VNC support would be catered around the GNOME Remote Desktop support and make use of PipeWire. The focus around GNOME is of little surprise considering that is the default desktop environment of Fedora Workstation and currently offers the best Wayland support.

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28-Way Linux CPU/System Comparison From Old To New

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

This week have been various unique and extra articles and benchmarks for commemorating the Phoronix 14th birthday. The latest of these fun articles is taking a look back at how various CPUs over the years compare to today's Intel Core and AMD Ryzen offerings.

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Also: A Revived Linux Driver To Be Attempted For The ATI RAGE 128

NVIDIA vs. AMD Linux GPU Performance For THRONES OF BRITANNIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

This morning Feral Interactive released A Total War Saga: THRONES OF BRITANNIA for Linux gamers. This Linux port of A Total War Saga: THRONES OF BRITANNIA is powered by the Vulkan graphics API rather than OpenGL and makes for an interesting test subject. Here are our initial benchmarks of this game under Ubuntu Linux with a range of AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards.

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Graphics Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • There's A Discussion Again About Flipping On Intel "Fastboot" DRM Driver Support

    For over six years now has been the Intel DRM driver's "Fastboot" support for eliminating unnecessary mode-set operations during the boot process, with an original focus on improving the laptop/ultrabook boot experience. While there have been attempts at getting Fastboot enabled by default, it hasn't happened to date but now a Red Hat developer is hoping to get it turned on for at least some generations of Intel hardware to benefit the work going into improving the Fedora boot experience.

  • Does Forcing "High" DPM Performance Help Out Your AMDGPU Performance?

    A premium patron recently asked about testing the open-source Radeon driver performance when testing the forced "high" dynamic power management state rather than the default "auto" mode. Here are some benchmarks.

  • Etnaviv Gallium3D Now Working On NIR Support

    The Etnaviv Gallium3D driver for providing reverse-engineered, open-source 3D graphics driver support for Vivante graphics hardware is currently pursuing NIR intermediate representation support.

    Philipp Zabel is one of multiple Pengutronix developers working on this open-source Etnaviv driver stack. He shared on Tuesday that they have been working on NIR support for a while, the new intermediate representation brought up over the past few years initially for the Intel Mesa driver and has since expanded to VC4, Freedreno, and optionally the RadeonSI driver as part of their SPIR-V support.

  • DXVK 0.54 Brings Better AMD Performance, Improved GPU Utilization

    DXVK 0.54 is available today as the latest version of this Direct3D-11-over-Vulkan translation layer to benefit Wine gamers looking to enjoy faster D3D11 gaming performance on Linux.

    With DXVK 0.54 comes support for utilizing host-visible device-local memory with AMD graphics cards. This allows putting dynamic resources there that need fast access by the graphics processor. In turn this should improve the performance; at least for The Witcher 3 it ends up being about a 5% performance improvement for this change to the memory flags.

  • DXVK 0.54 released with improved AMD GPU performance, plus DXUP for D3D10 is a thing

    The awesome DXVK project for Vulkan D3D11 in Wine has another fresh release out and it's a pretty good one.

    Once again, I'm shocked by how quickly it has been releasing updates and solving issues. Considering it's mostly by one person, it's mind-boggling how far it has come in such a short amount of time. Anyway…here's what's new on 0.54.

  • The Big DRM Updates For Linux 4.18: Intel Icelake, Vega M, Vega 20 & V3D

    David Airlie, the subsystem maintainer for the Direct Rendering Manager, has submitted the big feature pull request today for the Linux 4.18 kernel. All of the DRM feature work yields a net gain of close to fifty-thousand lines of code for this cycle.

  • [Older] GPU virtualization update

macOS 10.13 vs. Windows 10 vs. Clear/Fedora/openSUSE/Ubuntu Linux Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

When running tests this week on a MacBook Pro for the Dota 2 Vulkan/OpenGL cross-OS performance I also took the opportunity as part of the fun benchmarking week for celebrating the Phoronix 14th birthday by running a broader set of system benchmarks across the latest macOS 10.13 High Sierra, Windows 10 Pro, and various Linux distributions. Here are those CPU/system performance benchmark results.

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Best Tools to Access Remote Linux Desktop

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Ubuntu: Server Installer, IoT Security, Snaps, Xubuntu

  • The improved 18.04.1 LTS Server Installer - Call for testing!
    With the release of 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver the new server installer was introduced. At the time, it still lacked certain critical features which have now been implemented.
  • Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS Introducing Revised Server Installer, Adds Missing Features
    With the April release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on the server front was a brand new, in-house developed server installer created by Canonical to differentiate it from Debian's long-used text installer for the Ubuntu Server images. While it offered a fresh look and some new features, it shipped without many features common to Linux server installers. Fortunately, that is changing with the upcoming Ubuntu Server 18.04.1 release. As expected, Canonical is filling in the gaps with their new server installer dubbed Subiquity. With the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS release they will be shipping a new version of this installer. This updated installer now supports LVM, RAID, VLAN, and bonds -- important features missing originally from Ubuntu Server 18.04.0. The functionality is now in place with the latest daily images although the text-based user-interface is still being refined.
  • IoT Security at Scale: Managing end-to-end security
  • Perfectly Formed Snaps Challenge
    Snaps are perfect for the smaller things in life too. Looking away from the graphical flagship apps, the snap store hosts lightweight server daemons, command line utilities, developer tools and even tiny games. Recently, a couple of petite snaps were published in the store. Sparky is a simple game played in a terminal, and a modest 32KB on disk. Bash-Shell-RPG is similarly diminutive at only 8KB. Neither contain an excess of additional libraries, just the absolute minimum needed to function everywhere.
  • What’s New in Xubuntu 18.04 LTS
    Xubuntu 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Xubuntu, it now available to download and install on your laptop and PC. This release features latest version of Xfce 4.12 as default desktop, include latest Xfce components. Xubuntu 18.04 LTS also comes with an updated Greybird GTK+ theme that includes a new dark style, better HiDPI support, greater consistency between GTK+ 2 and GTK+ 3 apps, GTK+ 3 styles for Google Chrome and Chromium web browsers, smaller switches, and improved scales. However, the GTK Theme Configuration tool was removed and it’s no longer possible to override colors in themes.

Software: Latte Dock, Emacs, Ick, REAPER

  • Latte Dock 0.8 Released with Widget Separators, Setup Sharing, More
    A new version of Latte Dock, an icon-based task bar for the KDE desktop, is available to download. Latte Dock 0.8 is the first stable release of the app switching software in almost a year and is the third stable release overall.
  • 3 Emacs modes for taking notes
    No matter what line of work you're in, it's inevitable you have to take a few notes. Often, more than a few. If you're like many people in this day and age, you take your notes digitally. Open source enthusiasts have a variety of options for jotting down their ideas, thoughts, and research in electronic format. You might use a web-based tool. You might go for a desktop application. Or, you might turn to the command line. If you use Emacs, that wonderful operating system disguised as a text editor, there are modes that can help you take notes more efficiently. Let's look at three of them.
  • Ick version 0.53 released: CI engine
    I have just made a new release of ick, my CI system. The new version number is 0.53, and a summary of the changes is below. The source code is pushed to my git server (git.liw.fi), and Debian packages to my APT repository (code.liw.fi/debian). See https://ick.liw.fi/download/ for instructions.
  • REAPER 5.93 Brings New Linux-Native Builds
    Since 2016 we have been looking forward to the REAPER digital audio workstation software for Linux while with this week's v5.93 release, the experimental Linux-native builds are now officially available.
  • Digital Audio Workstation REAPER Adds Experimental Native Linux Builds
    REAPER, a popular music production tool, added experimental native Linux builds to its download page with the latest 5.93 release. Initially released in 2005, REAPER (Rapid Environment for Audio Production, Engineering, and Recording) is a powerful digital audio workstation (DAW) and MIDI sequencer, available for Windows, macOS and Linux. Cockos, the company that develops REAPER, was founded by Justin Frankel of Winamp and Gnutella peer-to-peer network fame. The application uses a proprietary license and you can evaluate it for free for 60 days without having to provide any personal details or register. After the free trial ends, you can continue to use it but a nag screen will show up for a few seconds when the application starts. A license costs $225 for commercial use, or $60 for a discounted license (details here).

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