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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux Graphics and Games

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Marek Has Been Taking To AMDGPU LLVM Optimizations

    Well known AMD open-source driver developer Marek Olšák has ruthlessly been optimizing the Radeon Mesa driver stack for years. With RadeonSI getting fine-tuned and already largely outperforming the AMDGPU-PRO OpenGL driver and most of the big ticket improvements complete, it appears his latest focus is on further optimizing the AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end.

    This AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end is what's used by RadeonSI but is also leveraged by the RADV Vulkan driver, among other potential use-cases. Lately Marek has been filing patches for optimizing the instructions generated during the shader compilation process.

  • FFmpeg Expands Its NVDEC CUDA-Accelerated Video Decoding

    A few days back I wrote about FFmpeg picking up NVDEC-accelerated H.264 video decoding and since then more FFmpeg improvements have landed.

    As mentioned in the earlier article, NVDEC is the newer NVIDIA video decoding interface that is succeeding their Linux-specific VDPAU in favor of the cross-platform, CUDA-based NVIDIA Video Codec SDK. There's also NVENC on the video encode side, while the recent FFmpeg work has been focused on the NVDEC GPU-based video decoding.

  • Intel Batch Buffer Logger Updated For Mesa

    Intel's Kevin Rogovin has been working on a "BatchBuffer Logger" for the Intel graphics driver that offers some useful possibilities for assisting in debugging/analyzing problems or performance penalties facing game/application developers.

    The BatchBuffer Logger is designed to allow correlating API calls to data that in turn is added to a batch buffer for execution by the Intel graphics processor. The logger additionally keeps precise track of the GPU state and can report various metrics associated with each API call.

  • Feral Interactive continues to contribute to Mesa as one of its developers gets commit privileges

    Alex Smith of Feral has been granted the right to push code into Mesa, a continuing sign of the commitment of Feral to Mesa and Vulkan.

    In this recent exchange Feral dev and active Mesa contributor, Alex Smith, has asked and gotten permission to create an account to directly access the Mesa driver’s git. His stated purpose is to provide fixes for Vulkan drivers, so we can take that as a sign that Feral is pretty serious at not only contributing to the open source Mesa project but also at using the Vulkan API in their current and future ports.

  • I played a bit of Die Totenmaske and it was a very strange experience
  • Valve has added 11 new currencies to the Steam Store

    Recent changes to the Steam Store have seen the addition of more local currencies for customers in different regions. Expect to get more bang for your Peso or Dinar.

    Originally tweeted by the excellent SteamDB, it would seem that customers in different regions will be able to buy from the Steam Store using their local currency. This usually means lower prices and no fiddling about with conversion rates for currency and prices are also adjusted for regional standards. The changes went live earlier and users in the affected countries have gotten emails telling them about the new changes to the Steam Store.

  • Trüberbrook, a beautiful adventure game with Linux support, is on Kickstarter

    This story-driven adventure game set in 1960s Germany places you in the role of a young scientist who finds himself having to save the world.

  • Intra-System: Trust Issues fiendishly encourages betrayal, my thoughts on the experience

Ubuntu 17.10 Radeon Performance: Stock vs. X-Swat Updates vs. Oibaf PPA vs. Pkppa vs. Padoka PPA

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Graphics/Benchmarks

There are several Launchpad PPA options for Ubuntu users wanting to update their Mesa-based drivers. For those curious about the state of these different third-party repositories, here are a few words on them and benchmarks.

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Btrfs Zstd Compression Benchmarks On Linux 4.14

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Of the many new features in Linux 4.14, one of the prominent additions is initial support for Zstd compression that is initially wired in for transparent file-system compression with SquashFS and Btrfs. Here are some benchmarks of Zstd Btrfs compression compared to the existing LZO and Zlib compression mount options.

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AMD Linux Development

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring Queued For Linux 4.15

    We've been expecting it to happen for weeks while indeed the hwmon pull request was indeed sent in today exposing AMD Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC temperature reporting on Linux.

    The patch to the existing k10temp Linux hwmon driver has been floating around since September for AMD Zen / Family 17h temperature reporting finally being in place. It was staged in hwmon-next and is now called for pulling into the just-opened Linux 4.15 merge window.

  • Mesa Linux Graphics Stack Update Fixes AMD GPU Hang with Vulkan Dota 2 in VR

    Mesa, the open-source graphics stack for Linux-based operating systems, has been updated to this week to version 17.2.5, the fifth stability update to the Mesa 17.2 series.

    While Mesa devs are still working hard on the next major release of the graphics stack, Mesa 17.3, which is expected to arrive next week with numerous exciting new features and enhancements for Intel and AMD Radeon GPUs, they pushed another maintenance update to Mesa 17.2 to fix bugs, memory leaks, hangs, and other issues.

Graphics: Mesa 17.2.5 and Intel

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 17.2.5 Released

    The fifth point release to Mesa 17.2 is now available with the latest fixes while the Mesa 17.3 official release is imminent.

  • mesa 17.2.5

    Mesa 17.2.5 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    In Mesa Core a GL error related to the ARB_ES3_1_compatibility spec
    noticed with the GFXBench 5 Aztec Ruins has been corrected.

    The GLSL compiler is not giving a linker error for mismatching uniform
    precision with GLSL ES 1.00 any more. This enables, specially, several
    Android applications which violate this rule, like Forge of Empires,
    for example.

  • Intel Posts Patches For SPIR-V Generation From Mesa's GLSL Compiler

    Longtime Intel open-source graphics driver developer Ian Romanick has posted his initial set of patches for what he calls "the first of the real SPIR-V work."

  • Intel Begins Testing Early Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 4.16

    Linux 4.14 isn't even out the door yet but with the DRM-Next feature period over in preparation for the Linux 4.15 merge window, Intel open-source developers are already prepping code improvements that will in turn target Linux 4.16.

    Rodrigo Vivi announced the updated drm-intel-testing code today as the start of new feature material that will eventually find its way into the Linux 4.16 kernel next year.

12-Way Graphics Card OpenCL Comparison With AMDGPU-PRO 17.40 ROCm, NVIDIA 384.98

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With the recent testing of the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti being our new graphics card up for Linux benchmarking as well as having a new NVIDIA Linux graphics driver release, hare are OpenCL benchmarks of 12 graphics cards using the latest AMDGPU-PRO 17.40 and NVIDIA 384.98 Linux drivers on Ubuntu x86_64.

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Linux. the Linux Foundation, and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • SoundWire Subsystem Revised For The Linux Kernel

    SoundWire is being proposed again for being introduced to the Linux kernel as a new soundsystem. 

    Back in October 2016 is when Intel developers originally proposed SoundWire support for Linux. SoundWire is a low-power, two-pin bus that's been around since 2014 for supporting multiple audio streams and embedded control/commands. This specification is developed by MIPI. More details on the SoundWire specification via MIPI.org. 

  • The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit: the importance of a diverse community

    The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit was held recently in Prague. During the Summit the important issue of diversity in the opensource and tech communities was addressed.

    It was inspiring to hear from young expert speakers about the opportunities and challenges they face in these communities. Similarly the topic of gender diversity was also discussed.

  • Hyperledger Goes to School

    Hyperledger , the blockchain reference framework launched by the Linux Foundation , is nearly two years old. It is starting to gain commercial traction, underpinning projects such as Everledger , the blockchain to track the provenance of high-value items like diamonds.

    Now that Hyperledger is getting more popular, developers and businesspeople alike will want to get more acquainted with it. To that end, the Linux Foundation has partnered with edX to launch an online course. Founded by Harvard and MIT, edX is one of the many Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) providers on the web.

  • Most Blockchain Projects Go Bust

    Deloitte analyzed GitHub, the popular open-source code repository and collaboration platform, to examine the state of the blockchain development scene. GitHub boasts 24 million users and over 68 million projects.

  • OpenGL Atomic Counters Land For R600 Gallium3D

    Support for atomic counters have landed within the R600 Gallium3D driver that continues to be used by pre-GCN graphics cards from the Radeon HD 2000 series through the Radeon HD 6000 series.

  • Geometry Shader Support For RadeonSI's NIR Back-End

    AMD this year has been developing a NIR back-end for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver in part for supporting the ARB_gl_spirv extension in being able to re-use/share some code with the RADV Vulkan driver that obviously already deals with SPIR-V and relies on NIR for its intermediate representation. Now support for geometry shaders is coming to RadeonSI NIR.

Games and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Graphics: Sway, Intel. NVIDIA, and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Some Basic macOS 10.13 vs. Ubuntu 17.10 OpenGL Gaming Tests

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Following last week's F1 2017 launch for Linux which is making use of the Vulkan graphics API on Linux and Metal API on macOS, originally I set out to compare the macOS vs. Linux performance, but that didn't go quite as planned due to MacBook Pro woes. But here are some other OpenGL game tests between macOS and Ubuntu 17.10 Linux.

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Parrot Security 3.10 Ethical Hacking OS Adds Full Firejail/AppArmor Sandboxing

ParrotSec devs released today a new stable version of their Debian-based Parrot Security OS ethical hacking and penetration testing GNU/Linux distribution. There are many enhancements implemented in the Parrot Security OS 3.10 release, but the biggest new feature is the introduction of a full Firejail and AppArmor sandboxing system that should proactively protect the operating system from attacks by isolating its components with the combination of various security techniques. "The first experiments were already introduced in Parrot 3.9 with the inclusion of Firejail, but we took almost a month of hard work to make it even better with the improvement of many profiles, the introduction of the AppArmor support and enough time to make all the tests," reads today's announcement. Read more Also: Parrot 3.10 is out

GNOME 3.27.3 Released

  • GNOME 3.27.3 released
    GNOME 3.27.3, the third development snapshot in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available. A few more modules have been ported to meson, and lots of development is happening across all modules. To point out a few highlights, dconf-editor is seeing significant work, and evolution has had many bug fixes.
  • GNOME 3.27.3 Brings More Meson Ports, Redesign To DConf Editor
    Matthias Clasen of Red Hat announced the release of GNOME 3.27.3 this weekend. GNOME 3.27.3 is the latest in a string of development releases leading up to the stable GNOME 3.28 debut in March.
  • GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Gets Third Development Snapshot, More Meson Ports
    GNOME leader Matthias Clasen announced a few moments ago the availability of the third development snapshot towards the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions. The development cycle of the upcoming GNOME 3.28 desktop environment continues today with the GNOME 3.27.3 milestone, which ports more components to the Meson build system and adds various improvements to various apps and tools, including the Evolution email and calendar client, NetworkManager network connection manager, and dconf-editor.

Review: OnePlus 5T

Have you ever arrived at a party, looked around, and realized you’re totally underdressed? It’s a panic-inducing moment. This nightmare scenario happened to OnePlus earlier this year. Its OnePlus 5 had the brains to match any competing Android device, but next to phones like the Galaxy S8, LG G6, iPhone X, it looked, well, dowdy. With thick, squared off bezels and an eyesore of a home button, it was so last season. For four years, OnePlus has pinned its entire identity to the idea that it sells the phone with the highest specs at the lowest price. Instead of paying $850+ for a fancy phone from the likes of Google or Samsung, you can buy a nearly identical, slightly off-brand OnePlus for $500 or less. It was the phone those in the know would recommend to save a few hundred bucks and still have a brag-worthy device. But you couldn’t brag about the OnePlus 5, especially after some bugs plagued the device. Read more

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