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Graphics/Benchmarks

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 17.04 With Intel Kabylake Mobile Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While we've seen the Radeon Linux OpenGL driver get competitive to the Windows Radeon OpenGL driver and the NVIDIA Windows/Linux OpenGL binary drivers have long been on a level playing field, how's the Intel HD Graphics performance? Here are some quick and fresh benchmarks this weekend.

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LLVMpipe vs. OpenSWR Software Rendering On A 40 Core / 80 Thread Tyan Server

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With testing out a Tyan 1U server featuring dual Intel Xeon Gold 6138 CPUs, one of the uncommon test requests we have received but understandable given our audience is curiosity about the performance of OpenGL software rendering on this 40 core / 80 thread Xeon Scalable server when making use of Mesa's LLVMpipe software rasterizer and the newer OpenSWR driver from Intel.

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Graphics: Mesa, OpenGL, RadeonSI, OpenChrome and Ryzen Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Kernel and Graphics: Linux 4.12.9, 4.9.45, 4.4.84, and 3.18.67, Driver Development

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Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Graphics: RADV Radeon Vulkan Driver, Vega, Intel OpenGL/Vulkan

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Kernel and Graphics: Linux 4.13, FP64, Inputfd

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Graphics: Radeon, NVIDIA, and Nouveau

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon GPU Profiler 1.0.2 Released With Vega Support

    A new release is available for the Radeon GPU Profiler, AMD/GPUOpen's new low-level optimization tool for game/application developers.

    The Radeon GPU Profiler paired with AMDGPU-PRO on Linux allows for gaining low-level insights into the hardware's performance/behavior for a developer's workloads with Vulkan (or DirectX 12 on Windows). Radeon GPU Profiler tries to make Vulkan profiling quick and painless.

  • NVIDIA 384.69 Linux Driver Released With A Few Fixes

    NVIDIA today released the 384.69 Linux driver as their latest release in the 384 "long-lived" series.

    This is just a maintenance update to the 384 Linux driver and includes Quadro P4000 Max-Q support, an intermittent hang fix with Vulkan when using VK_KHR_display, disabling G-SYNC for desktop environments using libmutter-0.so, a update for the NVIDIA installer around SELinux, and removing support for checking for driver packages in the nvidia-installer.

  • Nouveau's Meager Changes Queued Up In DRM-Next For Linux 4.14

    The changes for the Nouveau open-source NVIDIA driver are now queued in the DRM-Next tree as new material for Linux 4.14.

    The Nouveau DRM work for Linux 4.14 isn't very significant at all and in total has just 287 lines of new code / 75 deletions, which is very tiny compared to the code churn seen by the other Direct Rendering Manager drivers.

Graphics and Hardware: VC5 Gallium3D, RADV Vulkan Driver, and AMD Ryzen

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • VC5 Gallium3D Driver Close To Merging To Mainline Mesa

    Broadcom's shiny new VC5 Gallium3D driver for supporting more modern graphics on future SoCs is close to merging to mainline Mesa.

    Details on VC5 are still scarce, such as when we'll see this new Broadcom graphics processor in SoCs/devices (hopefully future Raspberry Pis), but Eric Anholt continues developing this driver. VC5 does support OpenGL ES 3.0 and will also eventually be working on OpenCL and Vulkan support.

  • More Vega/GFX9 Fixes Posted For RADV Vulkan Driver

    It's looking like it shouldn't be much longer before David Airlie has the RADV Mesa Vulkan driver working well on AMD's new Radeon RX Vega graphics cards.

  • AMD Ryzen 3 CPUFreq Governor Benchmarks On Linux 4.13

    For those curious about the performance impact of the different CPUFreq governors on a low-end Ryzen 3 processor, here are some benchmarks.

    Using the Linux 4.13 Git kernel atop Ubuntu 17.04 with the AMD Ryzen 3 1200, I tested CPUFreq's ondemand, performance, powersave, schedutil, and conservative governors. As a reminder, Ubuntu defaults to CPUFreq's "ondemand" governor for AMD processors while the Intel CPUs using the P-State driver use "powersave" as their default.

  • ASRock AB350 Pro4: A Decent, Linux-Friendly Ryzen Motherboard For As Low As $69 USD

Graphics: XDC2017, VkMark, Intel, Mesa 17.1.7

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • XDC2017 To Feature Update On New Memory Allocation API, HDR, GPGPU, GLVND

    There is now less than one month to go until the annual X.Org Developers' Conference kicks off in Mountain View at the Googleplex. As such, the conference program is now filling up with the interesting talks.

    One of the talks we are very much looking forward to is James Jones' update on a new Unix Device Memory Allocation API. NVIDIA has continued working on a new memory allocation API suitable for OpenGL and Vulkan that will hopefully be adopted cross-vendor and end up being used by Wayland compositors rather than relying upon Mesa's GBM. At XDC2017, NVIDIA is expected to present a design proposal and some of their prototype code. NVIDIA also has talks about DeepColor for HDR (High Dynamic Range) monitor support under X11 as well as on GLVND, the OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library.

  • VkMark Makes It Easy To Run Small Vulkan Test Cases

    One of the Vulkan open-source projects I have been tracking the past few months has been VkMark and it's now at a stage where it's becoming sufficiently useful for some small Vulkan test-cases / micro-benchmarks.

  • Intel Submits A Final Batch Of Feature Changes For Their DRM Driver In Linux 4.14

    Intel's open-source developers working on the i915 DRM driver have submitted the last of their feature work slated for the upcoming Linux 4.14 kernel by way of DRM-Next.

  • mesa 17.1.7

    Mesa 17.1.7 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    The state tracker received a fix to avoid a crash accessing a null pointer exposed using llvmpipe on Windows.

  • Mesa 17.1.7 Brings Various Fixes For Users Of Stable Open-Source 3D Drivers

    While Mesa 17.2 is right around the corner, for those sticking to the vetted stable Mesa releases, the 17.1.7 point release is now available.

Kernel and Graphics: Android Kernels, Mesa, and Vulkan 1.0.59

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Android kernels: does upstream matter?

    There is this false narrative floating around in the dev community on how upstreaming breaks drivers and OEM code. Upstreaming breaking drivers and OEM code is not universally true- in contrast, it defies the very definition of a stable kernel.

    You see, each and every Android device out there runs a version of the Linux Kernel– and it doesn’t have to be the latest version all the time.

  • Mesa 17.2-RC5 Released, Final Should Come Within One Week

    The fifth and final planned release candidate of Mesa 17.2 is now available for testing.

  • Vulkan 1.0.59 Released With Shader Stencil Export

    Vulkan 1.0.59 is now available this weekend as the latest minor update to this high-performance graphics API.

    As usual, the bulk of this Vulkan 1.0.x point release is made up of document clarification/fixes to the text. Of those changes, nothing too notable stands out for Vulkan 1.0.59 but there is one new extension.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more