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Graphics/Benchmarks

today's leftovers: Linux and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Misc
  • Intel User-Mode Instruction Prevention Support Revised For The Linux Kernel

    An Intel engineer over the weekend sent out the latest patches for implementing the company's User-Mode Instruction Prevention (UMIP) support within the Linux kernel.

    User-Mode Instruction Prevention appears to be on track for upcoming Cannonlake processors and prevents certain instructions from being executed if the ring level is greater than zero. These instructions include the store task register, store machine status word, store global descriptor table, and store interrupt descriptor table. To fend off possible escalation attacks, Intel's UMIP security feature will prevent these instructions from being executed outside of the highest level privileges.

  • Mesa 17.3 Features - Vulkan Updates, Better Performance

    Mesa 17.3 is due out in the days ahead as the Q4'2017 installment of Mesa 3D for delivering the updated open-source OpenGL and Vulkan driver stacks for Linux and other platforms. As usual, this quarterly update to Mesa introduces a ton of new features, performance improvements, and other enhancements.

F1 2017 On Linux With 23 Graphics Cards, NVIDIA + AMDGPU-PRO + RADV

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Following various F1 2017 Linux gaming benchmarks over the past few days since this game's Linux release this past Thursday with a port to Vulkan, here is a 23-way graphics card comparison for this formula one racing game while having coverage of the NVIDIA, AMDGPU-PRO, and RADV Vulkan drivers atop Ubuntu Linux.

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Nouveau Linux 4.14 + Mesa 17.4-dev vs. NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks

It's been a while since last posting any open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) benchmarks compared to the official NVIDIA proprietary Linux graphics driver simply as there hasn't been too much progress to report on recently. There still isn't re-clocking for Maxwell 2 and Kepler GPUs, dynamic re-clocking remains unimplemented for earlier generations of GPUs, there is not a Nouveau Vulkan driver yet, and they remain tackling OpenGL 4.4~4.5 compliance. But for those wondering how the performance of Nouveau is with re-clocked Kepler / Maxwell 1 graphics cards, here are some fresh benchmarks of the very latest NVIDIA Linux drivers.

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Linux, Linux Foundation and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The Most Interesting Features Of The Linux 4.14 Kernel

    f Linux 4.14 weren't an LTS release with so many changes, it would likely be released today with -rc7 having come last week, but due to the size of this new kernel, 4.14-rc8 will most likely be christened today followed by Linux 4.14 next weekend. Here's a reminder about some of the most technically interesting work in this new kernel update.

  • AT&T, Tech Mahindra to build open source AI platform
  • "Chai" As An Effort For Reverse-Engineered ARM Mali T-Series Graphics

    This project called "Chai" is focusing on the Mali T760 graphics as found bundled in the Rockchip RK3288 SoC. But before getting too excited, the Chai code-base hasn't seen any new commits in three months already. Chai itself is derived from the reverse-engineering work, tooling, and other fundamentals done years ago by the Lima driver project that was all about Mali reverse engineering albeit with older generations of ARM's Mali graphics hardware.

  • Lugdunum Is Another Interesting Open-Source Vulkan 3D Engine, With glTF 2.0 Too

    A few days back I wrote about the Banshee engine picking up Linux support and its maturing Vulkan renderer. A Phoronix reader pointed out another project worthy of a shout-out.

    Lugdunum is a cross-platform 3D engine built around Khronos APIs, not only with Vulkan support but also glTF 2.0 for assets. Lungdunum is coded in C++14.

Kernel and Graphics: Thunderbolt, Nouveau and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Foundation Unveils Plans for Machine Learning Project
  • Thunderbolt 3 firmware updates

    I joined Red Hat's Desktop Hardware Enablement team almost a year ago. One of the things that I have been looking into recently is Thunderbolt 3. With kernel 4.13 we got a completely new kernel interface for interacting with it from userspace (the work was done by Intel). One of the two big things this interface provides is updating the firmware (the non-volatile memory, or NVM in short) of the host controller and attached thunderbolt devices. With help from Dell's Mario Limonciello, Intel's Yehezkel Bernat, and of course our own Richard Hughes I created a thunderbolt 3 plugin for fwupd, which device and host firmware updates should show up in GNOME Software (or any other fwupd userspace clients) and updating them should be a breeze. The code landed already in fwupd 0.9.7.

  • PGI Compiler 17.10 Released With CUDA 9.0 Support, OpenMP 4.5 Additions

    The NVIDIA-owned PGI has announced their latest monthly update to their proprietary CPU/GPU compiler stack for Windows, Linux, and macOS systems.

    PGI 17.10 is now available, including its free PGI Community Edition Version 17.10 update. The PGI compiler stack remains geared for HPC applications and supports Fortran/C/C++ and supports multi-core CPUs and NVIDIA GPUs with OpenACC, OpenMP, and CUDA offloading.

  • R600 Gallium3D Receiving Some New Improvements By David Airlie

    In between hacking on the RADV Vulkan driver, managing DRM-Next, and his other activities at Red Hat, David Airlie has now sent landed some improvements to the aging R600 Gallium3D driver and more improvements are on the way.

    Yesterday were several new R600 commits for this driver that supports from the ATI Radeon HD 2000 series through the AMD Radeon HD 6000 series graphics processors.

  • Nouveau DRM Changes Queued For Linux 4.15

    The Nouveau DRM kernel driver changes have now been submitted and pulled into DRM-Next for Linux 4.15.

    This open-source NVIDIA driver for Linux 4.15 includes Pascal temperature support, improved BAR2 handling, faster suspend process, a rework of the MMU code and proper support for Pascal's new MMU layout, the MMU changes allow for improving the user-space APIs at a later date, and various fixes.

34-Way Graphics Card Comparison On Ubuntu 17.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks

As part of marking AMD's open-source driver strategy starting 10 years ago, among other articles, over the past week I posted an 18-way Radeon graphics card comparison on Ubuntu 17.10 while upgrading to the latest drivers. Taking those numbers further and putting them into more perspective, here is now a brief 34-way comparison with the NVIDIA GeForce counterparts added in.

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Radeon RADV vs. NVIDIA Vulkan Performance For F1 2017 On Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Since yesterday's release of F1 2017 on Linux, it's been a very busy benchmarking session and these are just the first of the Radeon Vulkan tests to come of F1 2017. More will be coming over the weekend, including a larger GPU comparison. These are simply the latest results as of Friday afternoon; testing was also compounded by re-testing the NVIDIA GPUs too after Feral discovered a settings issue in their test script. For this article the selection of graphics cards tested were:

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10-Way NVIDIA GeForce Linux Vulkan Performance For F1 2017

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Today marked the Linux release of F1 2017, which was ported by Feral Interactive and with this port it went from being a Direct3D 11 game on Windows to exclusively making use of the Vulkan graphics API on Linux. Radeon GPU benchmarks are still ongoing, but for these launch-day benchmarks, here are F1 2017 performance numbers on Ubuntu Linux with a variety of GeForce graphics cards.

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Graphics: AMDKFD, Mesa, Etnaviv

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDKFD For Linux 4.15 Adding Usermode Events, Dropping Radeon DRM Support

    Building off an earlier update in DRM-Next of upstreaming more AMDKFD changes for Linux 4.15, a second batch of feature work was proposed today for merging into DRM-Next.

    Oded Gabbay has sent in a second batch of AMDKFD driver changes for Linux 4.15. AMDKFD, of course, being the HSA kernel driver. With this second batch of changes, it still is mostly focused on upstreaming APU work and not yet the discrete GPU bits needed.

  • GL_EXT_semaphore Being Prepped For Mesa, Used By SteamVR

    Andres Rodriguez of Valve has posted a set of 17 patches for implementing the OpenGL GL_EXT_semaphore extension within Mesa and wired through for RadeonSI.

    GL_EXT_semaphore is part of the OpenGL memory object support that was introduced as an extension this year for porting these semaphores / memory objects concepts from Vulkan back to OpenGL. Semaphores are synchronization primitives and the GL semaphores map to the semantics of Vulkan semaphores.

  • Etnaviv Gallium3D Driver Now Wiring Up ASTC Texture Compression

    The Etnaviv open-source driver stack providing reverse-engineered Vivante Linux graphics driver support continues on its feature streak.

    Some of the recent successes in the past several days for the Etnaviv driver have included Vivante GC7000 series patches for supporting this newer hardware, OpenGL 2.1 support, plans for eventually supporting OpenCL, and more.

  • Meson'ed Mesa Allows For 10 Second Build & Deploy Of Intel's Vulkan Driver

    Among the projects recently adopting the Meson build system has been Mesa 3D. The build time benefits are quite encouraging for developers.

    The Mesa onboarding of Meson has been happening in their Git code the past several weeks. Similar to other projects, Meson with the Ninja back-end is allowing for much quicker build times than using GNU Autotools and alternatives.

Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti review: A fine graphics card—but price remains high

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Reviews

The GTX 1070 Ti is a great graphics card but a frustrating product. In the year and a half since the GTX 1080 and the GTX 1070 launched, Nvidia has faced little competition from rival AMD, which has been stretched thin across the launch of mainstream graphics cards like the RX 480 and high-end processors like Ryzen Threadripper. As brilliant as those products are, particularly Threadripper, it took until August of this year for AMD to launch a competitor to Nvidia's year-old graphics cards. The resulting RX Vega 64 wasn't the graphical powerhouse many were hoping for, with high power consumption and performance that couldn't quite top a GTX 1080.

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More in Tux Machines

SparkyLinux Operating System Launches for Raspberry Pi, Based on Debian Stretch

SparkyLinux developers have released the SparkyLinux 4.7 operating system for ARMhf hardware architectures supported on Raspberry Pi single-board computers. This is the first release of the Debian-based SparkyLinux operating system to come to the tiny Raspberry Pi SBCs, most probably supporting both Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 single-board computers. The ARMhf port of SparkyLinux was in development for the last couple of months. Based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, SparkyLinux 4.7 for ARMhf includes all the Raspberry Pi scripts and packages, and it's distributed in two flavors, a graphical version using the lightweight Openbox window manager and a text-based Lite edition that lets you customize the OS as you see fit. Read more

Graphics: Radeon and Vulkan2

  • Radeon Overlay Is Similar To A Feature Mesa Offered For Years
    With yesterday's release of the Radeon Software Adrenalin driver for Windows, it actually picks up a feature that is roughly similar to something the open-source Radeon driver stack - and all of the Mesa's Gallium3D drivers for that matter - have offered for years.
  • Radeon GPU Profiler Updated For Better Profiling Of Vulkan Games
    Following yesterday's excitement around the Radeon Software Adrenalin Driver as well as word of AMD open-sourcing their Linux driver and making other Linux driver changes, AMD's GPUOpen team has announced the release of a new version of Radeon GPU Profiler.
  • Qualcomm Mentions "Vulkan2" & What I Would Suspect Of "Vulkan 2.0"
    During last week's Snapdragon Technology Summit, a few references to "Vulkan2" were dropped... Well, here's the official comment from Khronos on that as well as my thoughts on this hypothetical next version of Vulkan. Several Phoronix readers have pointed out (e.g.) references to "Vulkan2" in the context of the new Snapdragon 845 SoC announced at this year's Snapdragon Technology Summit. The Snapdragon 845 with Adreno 630 does mention "Vulkan2" support.

Games: Finding Paradise, ARK: Survival Evolved, Party Panic, LandTraveller, Xenomarine

Security: Fuzzing, Windows, and ROBOT

  • Language bugs infest downstream software, fuzzer finds
    Developers working in secure development guidelines can still be bitten by upstream bugs in the languages they use. That's the conclusion of research presented last week at Black Hat Europe by IOActive's Fernando Arnaboldi. As Arnaboldi wrote in his Black Hat Europe paper [PDF]: “software developers may unknowingly include code in an application that can be used in a way that the designer did not foresee. Some of these behaviors pose a security risk to applications that were securely developed according to guidelines.”
  • Kaspersky Antivirus Engine Causing BSOD on Windows 10 Fall Creators Update
    Despite the criticism it received in the United States and in the United Kingdom, Kaspersky continues to be one of the leading security vendors for Windows users across the world, with its software protecting millions of systems powered by Microsoft’s OS. But it turns out that some of those whose computers were running the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update and Kaspersky Internet Security 2018 have been hit by a bug causing a Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) since earlier this month. BornCity reveals that the issue first appeared earlier this month when some users complained of a BSOD on Windows 10 build 16299.98, which indicates that these systems were running the latest version of the OS with cumulative update KB4051963.
  • ROBOT Attack
    ROBOT is the return of a 19-year-old vulnerability that allows performing RSA decryption and signing operations with the private key of a TLS server.
  • ROBOT Attack: 19-Year-Old Bug Returns With More Power To Target Facebook & Paypal
    The attack can compromise a website’s RSA encryption by decrypting the data using the private key of the TLS server. It was possible because of the vulnerability present in the RSA algorithm used in SSL protocol, exploited by Bleichenbacher.