Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: Intel, Mesa, OpenCL

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Wants You To Help Test The i965 Mesa Shader Cache, Not Yet Enabled By Default

    Back in early November Intel finally landed its shader cache support for allowing GLSL shaders to be cached on-disk similar to the RadeonSI shader caching that has been present since earlier in the year. But this functionality isn't yet enabled by default as it still needs more testing.

    Last month I covered some early test results of this Intel i965 Mesa shader on-disk cache within Intel's Mesa GLSL Shader Cache Is Speeding Up Game Load Times. In my experiences thus far it's been working out well but currently isn't used by the Intel driver unless the MESA_GLSL_CACHE_DISABLE=0 environment variable is set.

  • 16-Bit Storage, variablePointers Land For ANV Vulkan Driver

    It's always great waking up to new features landing in Mesa Git.

    For the past several months Igalia developers have been working on SPV_KHR_16bit_storage and VK_KHR_16bit_storage support for the Intel ANV Vulkan driver. As implied by the name, this is about supporting 16-bit data types in shader input/output interfaces and push constant blocks. This Vulkan "half float" support has now landed in Mesa Git across a number of patches affecting NIR, ANV, and the Intel shader compiler.

  • POCL 1.0 RC1 Adds Experimental CUDA Backend, Full OpenCL 1.2 Support

    One of the most exciting open-source OpenCL projects we have been following in recent years is POCL as "Portable C" for having an LLVM-based portable OpenCL implementation to run on CPUs as well as GPUs now via AMD HSA back-end and a new experimental NVIDIA CUDA back-end. The POCL 1.0 release is finally near.

Windows 10 vs. Linux - Intel UHD Graphics OpenGL Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Over the past week I have carried out some Radeon and NVIDIA Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux benchmarks. While not quite as interesting as those discrete GPU comparisons, while having the Windows 10 Pro x64 Fall Creator's Update around and testing from the Core i7 8700K, I also ran some Windows vs. Linux tests for the integrated UHD Graphics.

Read more

Graphics: Way-Cooler and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Radeon vs. NVIDIA With Windows 10 & Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Complementing the Windows vs. Ubuntu Linux gaming performance numbers of the Radeon RX 580 and RX Vega 64 are now the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 and GTX 1080 graphics cards. As a reminder, the Radeon tests were done when using the Linux 4.15 kernel paired with Mesa 17.4-dev built against LLVM 6.0 SVN for the AMDGPU back-end, provided by the Padoka PPA. On the Windows side, the Radeon driver was Radeon Software Crimson ReLive 17.11.3.

Read more

Also: Phoronix Test Suite 7.6 M4 Available For Last Minute Testing

Kernel: Linux and Graphics (Systemd, Intel, AMD, Wayland)

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Systemd 236 Is Being Prepped For Release This Month With Many Changes

    Lennart Poettering has begun his release wrangling process in getting systemd 236 ready for release this month.

  • Intel Releases New Linux Media Driver For VA-API

    While Intel has been supporting VA-API for years, basically since X-Video/XvMC became irrelevant, as its primary video API for video acceleration, they are now rolling out a new media driver.

    [...]

    Details and motivation on writing this new "Intel Media Driver" for Linux remain light and I have yet to see any official announcement out of Intel, but the code is available via intel/media-driver on GitHub with the initial public code drop having just occurred yesterday.

  • Intel Sends In The First Set Of Changes For Linux 4.16 i915 DRM
  • AMDGPU's Scheduler Might Get Picked Up By Other DRM Drivers

    One of the benefits of open-source software is the ability for code re-use by other projects and that may now happen with the AMDGPU kernel driver's scheduler.

    Prominent Etnaviv driver developer Lucas Stach who has long been working on this open-source reverse-engineered Vivante graphics driver is looking to make use of the AMDGPU DRM scheduler. This scheduler is responsible for scheduling command submissions, supports scheduling priorities, and other related functionality.

  • AMD Publishes More DC Patches, Disables FreeSync By Default

    If you have encountered some early fallout from using the AMDGPU DC display stack or just want to help in testing patches likely to be queued for Linux 4.16, AMD has sent out another patch of DC patches.

    Harry Wentland of AMD kicked off his Friday morning by sending out another 20 patches for this big display code-base.

  • XDG-Shell Promoted To Stable In Wayland-Protocols 1.12

    Jonas Ådahl of Red Hat has released a new version of Wayland-Protocols, the collection of protocols that extends/introduces new functionality not part of the core Wayland protocol.

    Wayland-Protocols 1.12 is the new release and promotes the latest work on the XDG-Shell protocol from unstable to stable. XDG-Shell is the Wayland protocol extension for defining more functionality around traditional Linux desktop environments that isn't part of the core Wayland protocol. This includes work around window resizing/stacking/dragging and other functionality. Most (all?) Wayland desktop compositors now support XDG-Shell.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Docker on Windows 10 vs. Bare Metal Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the recent Windows 10 Fall Creator's Update there were some improvements to the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) particularly around boosting the I/O performance (though further WSL performance work is coming), so this week I've been carrying out some fresh benchmarks of Windows 10 WSL with its openSUSE and Fedora options. For additional perspective I also compared the performance to running benchmarks with Linux containers on Docker under Windows 10 and lastly the "bare metal" Linux performance.

Read more

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA's New Memory Allocator Project To Be Standalone, Undecided On Name

    Following NVIDIA's call for feedback on their effort to create a new device memory allocator API that would be of equal use to the upstream open-source drivers and potentially replace (or indirectly used by) the Wayland compositors in place of the existing GBM API and NVIDIA's failed EGLStreams Wayland push, their next steps continue to be formulated.

  • NVIDIA's Current Linux Driver Is Hungry For vRAM This Holiday

    With a NVIDIA Linux developer having confirmed a current driver performance regression affecting driver releases since the 378 series and not being worked around until the yet-to-be-released 390.xx beta driver, I decided to carry out some tests.

  • Nvidia Driver Problems: Bug Causes Performance Loss For Linux Users

    Graphics card maker Nvidia confirmed what gamers have suspected for some time: the company’s products experience a significant loss in performance on Linux operating systems, and Nvidia drivers appear to be the culprit.

  • AMD Announces The Radeon Software Adrenalin Driver

    AMD's embargo has just expired over the name of their new driver.

    This shouldn't come as a big surprise, but AMD has been pushing out big annual updates to their "Radeon Software" graphics driver the past few years. In December they will be shipping the successor to Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition.

Faulty Graphics Driver From NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • NVIDIA Confirms Linux Driver Performance Regression, To Be Fixed In 390 Series

    If you think recent NVIDIA Linux driver releases have been slowing down your games, you are not alone, especially if you are running with a GeForce graphics card having a more conservative vRAM capacity by today's standards.

    Long time ago Nouveau contributor turned NVIDIA Linux engineer Arthur Huillet confirmed there is a bug in their memory management introduced since their 378 driver series that is still present in the latest 387 releases.

  • NVIDIA has confirmed a driver bug resulting in a loss of performance on Linux

    It seems there's a performance bug in recent NVIDIA drivers that has been causing a loss of performance across likely all GPUs. Not only that, but it seems to end up using more VRAM than previous drivers too.

    User HeavyHDx started a thread on the official NVIDIA forum, to describe quite a big drop in performance since the 375 driver series. So all driver updates since then would have been affected by this.

Graphics: Intel and AMD Drivers, GNU/Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • 16-bit Vulkan/SPIR-V Support Revised For Intel's Driver

    Igalia developers have published their latest version of the big patch-set implementing 16-bit support within Intel's Vulkan driver and supporting the necessary 16-bit storage SPIR-V changes.

    Developers at consulting firm Igalia have been tasked the past few months with getting this 16-bit data "half float" support in place for the Intel open-source Vulkan driver with VK_KHR_16bit_storage and SPIR-V's SPV_KHR_16bit_storage along with the necessary plumbing to Mesa's GLSL and NIR code.

  • The Many Open-Source Radeon Linux Driver Advancements Of 2017

    There were many sizable open-source Radeon Linux driver accomplishments this year. It was this year in which the RadeonSI OpenGL driver matured enough to compete with -- and sometimes surpass -- the Radeon Windows driver when talking raw OpenGL performance, RadeonSI can also outperform the AMDGPU-PRO OpenGL hybrid driver in many Linux gaming tests, the RADV Vulkan driver matured a lot, and many other milestones were reached.

    Given the latest round of Windows vs. Linux Radeon gaming tests yesterday and the end of the year quickly approaching, I figured I would provide a list now about some of the major feats reached this year for the open-source Radeon graphics driver stack.

  • Compute Shader & GLSL 4.30 Support For R600 Gallium3D

    After recently getting some older Radeon GPUs to OpenGL 4.2 with new R600g patches and making other improvements to R600g, David Airlie has now sent out a set of patches for getting compute shaders and GLSL 4.30 working for some older pre-GCN GPUs with the R600 Gallium3D driver.

    Airlie sent out today patches getting compute shaders and GL Shading Language 4.30 working in R600g. It seems to be working out the best at the moment with the Radeon HD 6400 "Caicos" graphics cards while the HD 6900 "Cayman" series currently hangs on compute. For running OpenGL 4 on R600g, the HD 5800 series and HD 6900 series generally tends to be the best due to having real FP64 support working where as the other generations of hardware only expose OpenGL 3.3 by default (but can use a version override to later GL4 versions if not needing FP64 support).

  • The fastest and slowest versions of Linux

    To see which version of Linux is the quickest, Phoronix has conducted a set of benchmarks measuring the total boot time of 11 Linux distributions.

    The tests also measured the boot time of separate components, such as the loader and kernel of each distribution.

    Systemd benchmark, part of Phoronix Test Suite 7.4.0, was used to benchmark the boot time of the distributions, and the results were published on OpenBenchmarking.org.

    The tests show that the boot time of Linux distributions can vary substantially, with some systems taking over twice as long to boot up as others.

Windows 10 vs. Linux 4.15 + Mesa 17.4-dev Radeon Gaming Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

As we end out November, here is a fresh look at the current Windows 10 Pro Fall Creator's Update versus Ubuntu 17.10 with the latest Linux 4.15 kernel and Mesa 17.4-dev Radeon graphics driver stack as we see how various games compete under Windows 10 and Linux with these latest AMD drivers on the Radeon RX 580 and RX Vega 64 graphics cards.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Some FreeBSD Users Are Still Running Into Random Lock-Ups With Ryzen

While Linux has been playing happily with Ryzen CPUs as long as you weren't affected by the performance marginality problem where you had to swap out for a newer CPU (and Threadripper and EPYC CPUs have been running splendid in all of my testing with not having any worries), it seems the BSDs (at least FreeBSD) are still having some quirks to address. This week on the FreeBSD mailing list has been another thread about Ryzen issues on FreeBSD. Some users are still encountering random lockups that do not correspond to any apparent load/activity on the system. Read more

PC desktop build, Intel, spectre issues etc.

Apart from the initial system bought, most of my systems when being changed were in the INR 20-25k/- budget including all and any accessories I bought later. The only real expensive parts I purchased have been external hdd ( 1 TB WD passport) and then a Viewsonic 17″ LCD which together sent me back by around INR 10k/- but both seem to give me adequate performance (both have outlived the warranty years) with the monitor being used almost 24×7 over 6 years or so, of course over GNU/Linux specifically Debian. Both have been extremely well value for the money. As I had been exposed to both the motherboards I had been following those and other motherboards as well. What was and has been interesting to observe what Asus did later was to focus more on the high-end gaming market while Gigabyte continued to dilute it energy both in the mid and high-end motherboards. Read more

Intel OpenGL vs. Vulkan Performance With Mesa 18.0

Given the very strong Vulkan vs. OpenGL performance in the recent low-end/older Linux gaming GPU tests with discrete graphics cards, I was curious to run some benchmarks seeing the current state of Intel's open-source OpenGL vs. Vulkan performance. With the Mesa 18.0 release to be branched soon, it was a good time seeing how the Intel i965 OpenGL and ANV Vulkan drivers compare. Read more

How To Install Themes Or Icons In Elementary OS

After installing Elementary OS, you may feel that you want to customize it to look more than Out-of-the-box system, and more of a personalized Operating system per se. It's very easy to install themes and icons for your Elementary OS. The process is pretty much the same as installing icons and themes in any ubuntu system since it is built upon Ubuntu. Read
more