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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: Vulkan, AMDGPU, Wayland

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan Display Extensions To Be Used By SteamVR Merged Into Mesa RADV/ANV

    Keith Packard's long in development work for improving the Linux display stack infrastructure for better dealing with VR head-mounted displays is about rounded out with the new Vulkan extension support being merged into Mesa.

    Just over a year ago famed X developer Keith Packard started contract work for Valve to improve the plumbing around the Linux/X.Org support for virtual reality HMDs for better performance and better integration. Within the Linux kernel and the X.Org Server he's worked and landed the DRM leasing support of outputs to let a VR compositor (Steam VR) have direct access to the output, "non-desktop" quirk handling so VR HMDs don't become mapped as part of a standard Linux desktop, and related work.

  • A Slew Of AMDGPU DC Updates Published, Further Improvements For Raven Ridge

    There hasn't been a new AMDGPU DC code drop in a while as AMD developers work to improve their internal processes, but hitting the wire today is a set of 51 new patches for this "display code" stack that work on a variety of improvements.

  • Sway 1.0 Wayland Compositor Nears With Floating Windows, Tablet Support & More

    The release of the Sway 1.0 Wayland compositor is inching closer with the recent third alpha release. Sway for the uninformed is a very promising i3-compatible Wayland compositor.

    Earlier this month Sway 1.0 Alpha 3 was released to succeed the second alpha release from the month prior. Sway 1.0 is succeeding the Sway 0.15 changes with a great deal of improvements. Most notably with the 1.0 series is now requiring the WLROOTS modular Wayland compositor library.

Graphics: Wayland, RadeonSI, NVIDIA and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Session suspension and restoration protocol
  • A Session Suspension & Restoration Protocol Proposed For Wayland

    KDE Wayland developer Roman Gilg who started contributing to Wayland via last year's Google Summer of Code is proposing a new Wayland protocol for dealing with desktop session suspension and restoration.

    This protocol extension would allow for more efficient support for client session suspension and restoration such as when you are logging out of your desktop session and want the windows restored at next log-in or if you are suspending your system. While Roman Gilg is working on this protocol with his KDE hat on, he has been talking with Sway and GNOME developers too for ensuring this protocol could work out for their needs.

  • RadeonSI Lands OpenGL 3.3 Compatibility Profile Support

    Thanks to work done over the past few months by AMD's Marek Olšák on improving Mesa's OpenGL compatibility profile support and then today carried over the final mile by Valve's Timothy Arceri, Mesa 18.2 now exposes OpenGL 3.3 under the compatibility context.

    Hitting Git tonight is the enabling of the OpenGL 3.3 compatibility profile for RadeonSI.

  • NVIDIA Releases DALI Library & nvJPEG GPU-Accelerated Library For JPEG Decode

    For coinciding with the start of the Computer Vision and Patern Recognition conference starting this week in Utah, NVIDIA has a slew of new software announcements.

    First up NVIDIA has announced the open-source DALI library for GPU-accelerated data augmentation and image loading that is optimized for data pipelines of deep learning frameworks like ResNET-50, TensorFlow, and PyTorch.

  • NVIDIA & Valve Line Up Among The Sponsors For X.Org's XDC 2018

    -
    The initial list of sponsors have been announced for the annual X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2018) where Wayland, Mesa, and the X.Org Server tend to dominate the discussions for improving the open-source/Linux desktop.

    This year's XDC conference is being hosted in A Coruña, Spain and taking place in September. The call for presentations is currently open for X.Org/mesa developers wishing to participate.

  • Intel Broxton To Support GVT-g With Linux 4.19

    Intel developers working on the GVT-g graphics virtualization technology have published their latest batch of Linux kernel driver changes.

Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux literally loses its Lustre – HPC filesystem ditched in new kernel

    Linux has literally lost its Lustre – the filesystem favoured by HPC types has vanished in the first release candidate of version 4.18 of the Linux kernel.

    Linus Torvalds’ announcement of the new release lauds the fact it’s shrunk markedly, much of which can be attributed to the removal of Lustre.

    “The removal of Lustre may not be all that notable, because it does look like a lot of the development has been happening out of tree, which may be why it never really ended up working as well as people hoped in the staging tree,” Torvalds wrote. “ Greg [ Kroah-Hartman] clearly got pretty frustrated about it, so now it's gone.”

    How frustrated? Kroah-Hartman explained Lustre's omission by saying it has "been in the kernel tree for over 5 years now" but "has not really moved forward into the 'this is in shape to get out of staging' despite many half-completed attempts."

  • Harmonising open source and standards in the telecom world [Ed: Phone surveillance company pays LF and then (mis)appropriates the “Linux” brand to push its “whitepapers” (marketing)]

    Standards have played a major role in telecommunications technology adoption for many years, validating the commercial viability of new technologies, facilitating multi-vendor interoperability, improving product quality, and expediting the introduction of technologies that would otherwise proliferate in a sea of proprietary alternatives.

  • OpenGL Floating Point Textures No Longer Encumbered By Patents, Enabled In Mesa

    Back in 2012 when talking with Gabe Newell of Valve about open-source/Linux challenges one of the topics he was awed about was patents encumbering the open-source graphics driver progress. Six years later, Timothy Arceri working on the Valve Linux graphics driver team has freed Mesa's ARB_texture_float support from being built conditionally due to these patent fears.

  • Vulkan 1.1.78 Released With Various Issues Resolved

    Vulkan 1.1.78 is now available as the newest version of the Vulkan specification.

    The Vulkan 1.1.78 spec update is another fairly small update that doesn't introduce any new VK extensions or any major changes. Vulkan 1.1.78 has minor documentation fixes, resumes publishing of the Vulkan 1.0 + KHR extension documentation, clears up some behavior in some Vulkan usage, and other changes.

  • AMDGPU Performance Tests With New WattMan-Like Settings, Power Capping

    With the recent stable debut of the Linux 4.17 kernel, one of the most common performance test requests coming in has been for checking out the Radeon WattMan-like support that was introduced with the Linux 4.17 AMDGPU code for recent generations of Radeon graphics card. Here are some benchmarks of that and on a somewhat related note also some Linux gaming benchmark results when carrying out some power capping tests to restrict the graphics card to a given Wattage.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.0.1 Is Coming Next Week

    Just a heads up that Phoronix Test Suite 8.0.1 is slated for release next week if there are any last minute bug reports or requests.

EXT4 fscrypt vs. eCryptfs vs. LUKS dm-crypt Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent advancements of the EXT4 file-system with its native file-system encryption support provided by the fscrypt framework, here are benchmarks comparing the performance of an EXT4 file-system with no encryption, fscrypt-based encryption, eCryptfs-based encryption, and a LUKS dm-crypt encrypted volume.

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Kernel and Graphics: RISC-V, Intel, Wayland and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • RISC-V Changes Merged For Linux 4.18, Early Perf Subsystem Work

    Initial RISC-V architecture support was added to the Linux 4.15 kernel and in succeeding kernel releases have been mostly modest updates. With Linux 4.18 the RISC-V changes are on the small side still, but with a few notable additions for this open-source, royalty-free processor ISA.

  • Intel Icelake Bringing New MIPI DSI Controller, Linux Driver Patches Posted

    While Intel Icelake hardware is quite a ways out from making its debut, the open-source Intel Linux developers working on the hardware enablement for its "Gen 11" graphics continue working dilligently on this hardware enablement.

    Preparations for Intel Icelake support began with the Linux 4.17 kernel, have continued with the current 4.18 development cycle, and will continue for the next several cycles as all of the support gets squared away, just not for the graphics hardware.

  • NVIDIA Contributes EGLStreams Improvements For GNOME's Mutter Wayland Support

    GNOME's Mutter Wayland compositor support is among the few Wayland implementations offering support for EGLStreams so it can play along with the approach used by the NVIDIA proprietary driver as an alternative to the GBM API used by the open-source graphics drivers. One of the NVIDIA engineers has just furthered along Mutter's EGLStreams support.

  • Mesa 18.1.2 Released With Several RADV & Intel Driver Fixes

    New Mesa release manager Dylan Baker has issued the second point release of the Mesa 18.1 series.

    Mesa 18.1 has many exciting features and continues to see new bi-weekly point releases until after Mesa 18.2 has been released around the middle of August and then sees its subsequent Mesa 18.2.1 point release before that kills off the 18.1 release stream.

Mesa Graphics in Linux

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Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Mesa Rolls Out Support For ARB_sample_locations

    Mesa has been plumbed in to support the ARB_sample_locations OpenGL extension and is now exposed with the Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D driver.

    ARB_sample_locations was part of the "OpenGL 2015" update but hasn't made it into a released version of OpenGL, hence why it wasn't a priority for Mesa developers. But now it's been wired up within core Mesa and is currently flipped on for NVC0 in Mesa 18.2-devel.

  • Mesa's VirGL For OpenGL Within VMs Now Supports Tessellation Shaders

    It was just days ago that the VirGL driver stack -- which is used for supporting OpenGL hardware acceleration within guest VMs that is passed onto the host's driver -- picked up FP64 support while now its latest addition is ARB_tessellation_shader support.

    With the latest Mesa Git and the VirGL renderer library code is updated (as well as your host OpenGL driver supporting GL4), there is now support for tessellation shaders. The support has landed in Mesa 18.2 Git for this popular OpenGL 4.0 feature.

Graphics: Nouveau Benchmarks, H.264, Mesa and Libinput

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The NVIDIA vs. Open-Source Nouveau Linux Driver Benchmarks For Summer 2018

    It has been some months since last delivering any benchmarks of Nouveau, the open-source, community-driven for NVIDIA GPUs. The reason for not having any Nouveau benchmarks recently has largely been due to lack of major progress, at least on the GeForce desktop GPU side, while NVIDIA has continued to contribute on the Tegra side. For those wondering how the current performance is of this driver that started out more than a decade ago via reverse-engineering, here are some benchmarks of the latest open-source Nouveau and NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers on Ubuntu.

  • H.264 Decoding Tackled For Reverse-Engineered "Cedrus" Allwinner Video Decode Driver

    The Bootlin (formerly Free Electrons) developers working on the Cedrus open-source, reverse-engineered Allwinner video decode driver have posted their patches for enabling H.264 video decoding.

    Earlier versions of their Sunxi-Cedrus driver patches had just supported MPEG-2 with other codecs to be tackled, but hitting the kernel mailing list this week were their patches for enabling H.264 decoding on Allwinner hardware.

  • More Vega M Performance Numbers Surfacing, Linux State Looking Good

    The performance of the Intel Core i7-8809G "Kabylake G" processor with onboard Radeon "Vega M" graphics are looking quite good under Linux now that the support has been squared away.

  • Mesa RadeonSI Lands Possible Vega/Raven Performance Improvement

    Earlier this month AMD's Marek Olšák posted RadeonSI patches for a scissor workaround affecting GFX9/Vega GPUs including Raven Ridge, which were based upon a RADV driver workaround already merged that helped affected games by up to ~11%. A revised version of that patch is now in Mesa 18.2 Git.

  • libinput and its device quirks files

    This post does not describe a configuration system. If that's all you care about, read this post here and go be angry at someone else. Anyway, with that out of the way let's get started.

    For a long time, libinput has supported model quirks (first added in Apr 2015). These model quirks are bitflags applied to some devices so we can enable special behaviours in the code. Model flags can be very specific ("this is a Lenovo x230 Touchpad") or generic ("This is a trackball") and it just depends on what the specific behaviour is that we need. The x230 touchpad for example has a custom pointer acceleration but trackballs are marked so they get some config options mice don't have/need.

Graphics: Wayland, Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) by Intel Inside Linux, and VFIO Drivers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Wayland's Weston 5.0 Moved Up To An August Release

    Following the recent discussions of moving Wayland's Weston compositor to a 4-month release schedule and possibly doing away with time-based Wayland releases itself, Weston 5.0 will now be coming out in August.

    Feature development on Weston is as busy as ever while Wayland (libwayland) is quite mature and not seeing too much churn. Upstream Wayland developers now appear to be in agreement to carrying out the next Weston release at least on a four-month release cycle.

  • Librem 5 progress report #14

    On the nuts and bolts level, our phone shell (phosh) has seen several usability improvements mostly around the lockscreen. One important change is that the lockscreen unlocking has been switched to PAM to better handle the PIN to lock the device. There have also been some additions to the code to better handle multiple outputs (screens). Also, Libhandy is our “handy” UI library for developing GTK+ apps. There has been a recent addition of an arrows widget (HdyArrows) to indicate swiping direction which will be very useful to many applications, especially the lockscreen. Additionally, libhandy has seen some bug fixes and a slight rework of the keyboard handling support. Since graphics are important, we have added Etnaviv support to weston-simple-dmabuf (a Wayland client to test Linux DMA-BUF protocol implementations). We also extended it’s NV12 format support. It’s being used over here to test wlroot’s linux-dmabuf implementation which we wrote a couple of weeks ago. We’d like to especially thank the wlroots and Weston projects for their code reviews, recommendations, and support.

  • Librem 5 Continues Working On Its Wayland Software Stack, Testing Vibration Motors, Chargers

    Purism has published their latest progress report on the Librem 5 privacy-minded Linux-powered smartphone that they still hope to begin shipping next January.

  • Intel Developers Working On HDCP Content Protection Protocol For Wayland [Ed: This is basically “Linux Vista”. First Web DRM (EME). Now LF sells out as well.]

    With Intel's DRM kernel driver now supporting HDCP for High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection with work done by Intel and Google developers, there is now work underway for allowing HDCP to work in a Wayland-based environment.

    As with the work done on the Direct Rendering Manager side, these Wayland patches aren't enforcing any restrictions on users by itself but is simply making the support available should any applications come along that wish to enforce HDCP usage on the Linux desktop.

  • VFIO Adds Sample Mediated Device Display Drivers

    The VFIO framework that allows exposing direct device access to user-space in a secure, IOMMU-protected fashion is gaining some new sample drivers in Linux 4.18.

Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Last month Samsung introduced the 970 Series solid-state drives with the mainstream 970 EVO models and 970 PRO models for professionals/enthusiasts. The 970 Series moves to a 64-layer flash and uses a five-core Phoenix controller. For those curious about the Samsung 970 EVO performance under Linux, I have carried out some quick benchmarks to show off its potential under Ubuntu.

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Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 2700X For Vulkan Gaming With Thrones of Britannia

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Published this weekend was a 25-way Linux graphics card comparison for the newest major Linux game release, A Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia, that was released natively for Linux days ago by Feral Interactive and ported from Direct3D to Vulkan in the process. As a result of premium requests, here are some additional tests for this Linux game when comparing the performance on Intel Core i7 8700K and Ryzen 7 2700X processors.

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More in Tux Machines

A look at Lutris – Open Gaming Platform for GNU/Linux

Lutris is quite the handy application I’ve discovered, that helps with organization and installation of games on GNU/Linux, even if they come from multiple sources. One of the project's goals is to support any game that runs on Linux regardless of whether it runs natively, through Wine, or other means. The main appeal of Lutris is that it provides an interface to manage all games installed on the machine regardless of source. While it is necessary to integrate the games in the application first, doing so is not super complicated. You may add local games right away by selecting them from the local system or visit the Lutris website to add games this way. Lutris simplifies nearly everything. Users can visit the list of support games on the Lutris website, choose to download and install the game (Note: If its a game that must be bought, you must own it first.) The website lists supported games and where you can acquire or download them. You can use filters on the site to display only free games, games of a genre, or use the built-in search to find games of interest quickly using it. Read more

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.