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Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel Core i7-1065G7 Ice Lake Linux Performance Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Recently I picked up a Dell XPS 7390 Core i7 Ice Lake laptop for finally testing this Intel 10nm+ processor under Linux. I have delivered some results so far like the Windows vs. Linux OpenGL/Vulkan performance and the Spectre impact with Ice Lake while this article is the first of several really drilling down on the CPU performance. In this article are benchmarks showing how the Core i7-1065G7 compares in raw performance and performance-per-Watt to the earlier Core i7-8565U (Whiskey Lake) and Core i7-8550U (Kabylake-R) processors.

The Dell XPS 7390 / Core i7-1065G7 continues working out well under Linux as noted in the earlier article with just the potential caveats of needing to switch the storage setting in the firmware over to AHCI mode and on some distributions needing to boot with the intel_lpss_pci driver black-listed. There is also the caveat of Ice Lake Thunderbolt support not in the mainline kernel until Linux 5.4, but at least for Ubuntu 19.10 Canonical has ended up back-porting it to Linux 5.3, but I haven't seen any other major distributions do the same yet. But besides those few blemishes on modern Linux distributions you should be in good shape for the new Dell XPS / Ice Lake.

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Graphics: Mesa 19.1.8, dGPU and Intel

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 19.1.8
    Mesa 19.1.8 is now available.
    
    NOTE: It is anticipated that 19.1.8 will be the final release in the
    19.1 series. Users of 19.1 are encouraged to migrate to the 19.2 series
    in order to obtain future fixes.
    
    Apologies for the big delay in this release; there were several regressions that we
    were investigating, which prevented the pre-release to be on time.
    
    Subject: [ANNOUNCE] mesa 19.1.8
    To: mesa-announce at lists.freedesktop.org
    Cc: mesa-dev at lists.freedesktop.org
    
    Adam Jackson (1):
          docs: Update bug report URLs for the gitlab migration
    
    Alan Coopersmith (5):
          c99_compat.h: Don't try to use 'restrict' in C++ code
          util: Make Solaris implemention of p_atomic_add work with gcc
          util: Workaround lack of flock on Solaris
          meson: recognize "sunos" as the system name for Solaris
          intel/common: include unistd.h for ioctl() prototype on Solaris
    
    Andreas Gottschling (1):
          drisw: Fix shared memory leak on drawable resize
    
    Andres Gomez (3):
          docs: Add the maximum implemented Vulkan API version in 19.1 rel notes
          docs/features: Update VK_KHR_display_swapchain status
          egl: Remove the 565 pbuffer-only EGL config under X11.
    
    Andrii Simiklit (1):
          glsl: disallow incompatible matrices multiplication
    
    Arcady Goldmints-Orlov (1):
          anv: fix descriptor limits on gen8
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (2):
          tu: Set up glsl types.
          radv: Add workaround for hang in The Surge 2.
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          st/nine: Ignore D3DSIO_RET if it is the last instruction in a shader
    
    Dylan Baker (5):
          meson: fix logic for generating .pc files with old glvnd
          meson: Try finding libxvmcw via pkg-config before using find_library
          meson: Link xvmc with libxv
          meson: gallium media state trackers require libdrm with x11
          meson: Only error building gallium video without libdrm when the platform is drm
    
    Eric Engestrom (4):
          gl: drop incorrect pkg-config file for glvnd
          meson: re-add incorrect pkg-config files with GLVND for backward compatibility
          util/anon_file: add missing #include
          util/anon_file: const string param
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (1):
          glsl: correct bitcast-helpers
    
    Greg V (1):
          util: add anon_file.h for all memfd/temp file usage
    
    Haihao Xiang (1):
          i965: support AYUV/XYUV for external import only
    
    Hal Gentz (1):
          gallium/osmesa: Fix the inability to set no context as current.
    
    Jason Ekstrand (2):
          nir/repair_ssa: Replace the unreachable check with the phi builder
          intel/fs: Fix fs_inst::flags_read for ANY/ALL predicates
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (12):
          docs: add sha256 checksums for 19.1.7
          cherry-ignore: add explicit 19.2 only nominations
          cherry-ignore: add explicit 19.3 only nominations
          Revert "Revert "intel/fs: Move the scalar-region conversion to the generator.""
          cherry-ignore: Revert "gallium: remove PIPE_CAP_TEXTURE_SHADOW_MAP"
          bin/get-pick-list.sh: sha1 commits can be smaller than 8 chars
          cherry-ignore: nir/opt_large_constants: Handle store writemasks
          cherry-ignore: util: added missing headers in anon-file
          cherry-ignore: radv: Fix condition for skipping the continue CS.
          cherry-ignore: Revert "radv: disable viewport clamping even if FS doesn't write Z"
          Update version to 19.1.8
          docs: add release notes for 19.1.8
    
    Ken Mays (1):
          haiku: fix Mesa build
    
    Kenneth Graunke (4):
          iris: Initialize ice->state.prim_mode to an invalid value
          intel: Increase Gen11 compute shader scratch IDs to 64.
          iris: Disable CCS_E for 32-bit floating point textures.
          iris: Fix iris_rebind_buffer() for VBOs with non-zero offsets.
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (5):
          anv: gem-stubs: return a valid fd got anv_gem_userptr()
          intel: use proper label for Comet Lake skus
          mesa: don't forget to clear _Layer field on texture unit
          intel: fix subslice computation from topology data
          intel/isl: Set null surface format to R32_UINT
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          gallium/vl: don't set PIPE_HANDLE_USAGE_EXPLICIT_FLUSH
    
    Matt Turner (1):
          util: Drop preprocessor guards for glibc-2.12
    
    Michel Dänzer (1):
          radeonsi: fix VAAPI segfault due to various bugs
    
    Michel Zou (2):
          scons: add py3 support
          scons: For MinGW use -posix flag.
    
    Paulo Zanoni (1):
          intel/fs: fix SHADER_OPCODE_CLUSTER_BROADCAST for SIMD32
    
    Prodea Alexandru-Liviu (1):
          scons/MSYS2-MinGW-W64: Fix build options defaults
    
    Rhys Perry (2):
          radv: always emit a position export in gs copy shaders
          nir/opt_remove_phis: handle phis with no sources
    
    Samuel Iglesias Gonsálvez (1):
          intel/nir: do not apply the fsin and fcos trig workarounds for consts
    
    Stephen Barber (1):
          nouveau: add idep_nir_headers as dep for libnouveau
    
    Tapani Pälli (3):
          iris: close screen fd on iris_destroy_screen
          egl: check for NULL value like eglGetSyncAttribKHR does
          util: fix os_create_anonymous_file on android
    
    pal1000 (2):
          scons/windows: Support build with LLVM 9.
          scons: Fix MSYS2 Mingw-w64 build.
    
    git tag: mesa-19.1.8
    
  • Mesa 19.1.8 Released To End Out The Series

    More than one month has passed since Mesa 19.1.7 compared to the usual bi-weekly release cadence, but on Monday following the closure of remaining blocker bugs, Mesa 19.1.8 was released that also ends out this release series.

    Mesa 19.1.8 is the last planned release in the 19.1 Q2 series with users now being encouraged to upgrade at least to the stable Mesa 19.2 while Mesa 19.3 should be out around early December.

  • Linux 5.5 To Restore Power-Savings For Hybrid Laptops When Not Using The dGPU

    On recent kernels when using a laptop with hybrid graphics but not running with the discrete GPU graphics enabled, a regression meant the dGPU never got powered off... Fortunately, for Linux 5.5 -- and potentially to be back-ported after that -- is a change to restore that power-savings.

    A change enabling NVIDIA HDA controller support inadvertently left dGPUs powered up when not in use, i.e. where the dGPU is not bound to a driver. When the NVIDIA discrete graphics aren't bound to a driver, the power saving path wasn't being hit where the platform power management could disable power to the GPU.

  • Intel Lands More Graphics Code For Linux 5.5 - Jasper, More Intel Xe Multi-GPU Prepping

    Intel's open-source developers kicked off a new week by sending in their latest vetted changes to DRM-Next ahead of next month's Linux 5.5 kernel cycle.

    They already have sent in a lot of new graphics driver code for Linux 5.5 particularly around Tiger Lake while this week's pull request contains more new hardware enablement. They also anticipate sending in another pull request next week to DRM-Next with any other lingering feature work they are hoping to get into Linux 5.5.

  • Intel's Graphics Compiler For Their NEO Compute Stack Now Supports Jasper Lake

    The team maintaining the LLVM-based Intel Graphics Compiler as part of their "NEO" OpenCL/Compute Stack have rolled out v1.0.2714 that includes initial support for Jasper Lake among other improvements.

    Just in the past week we've begun seeing Linux graphics driver patches around "Jasper Lake" and that initial kernel-side support coming for Linux 5.5. Jasper Lake is the rumored 10nm successor to Gemini Lake for low-power SoCs but not to be confused with Elkhart Lake that is Tremont+Gen11 also for ultra-low-power environments based upon the limited information thus far.

Graphics: Vulkan and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RLSL Allows Running A Subset Of Rust On Vulkan/SPIR-V Enabled GPUs

    There was a recent Khronos meet-up in Munich where Maik Klein of Embark Studios talked about their work on bringing a sub-set of the Rust programming language to Vulkan (SPIR-V) enabled GPUs.

    RLSL is the project being worked on by the Swedish game studio for opening up Rustlang use for GPUs to benefit from the language's same design advantages, provide a unified front-end, and being able to leverage the existing Rust ecosystem with the likes of Cargo/crates.

  • Raspberry Pi 4's V3D Driver Lands OpenGL ES 3.1 Bits In Mesa 19.3-devel

    The Broadcom "V3D" Gallium3D driver that is most notably used by the new Raspberry Pi 4 boards now is effectively at OpenGL ES 3.1 support within the newest Mesa 19.3 code.

    We've known that Igalia has been ironing out OpenGL ES 3.1 for V3D after taking over the work from Eric Anholt who left Broadcom earlier this year to go work for Google.

    Merged this past week was the OpenGL compute shader bits as the main blocker that prevented the V3D open-source Gallium3D driver from exposing GLES 3.1. Following that was a memory violation fix and then explicitly exposing OpenGL ES Shading Language 3.1. That merge request does note that a few more fixes are still needed before V3D will officially pass all of the OpenGL ES 3.1 conformance tests, but at least Mesa 19.3's code is good enough along to enable the support.

Graphics: Radeon, Mesa and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Open-Source C.A.S. Vulkan Layer - Similar to Radeon Image Sharpening But For Any GPU

    AMD's Radeon Image Sharpening feature is designed to improve image quality with minimal performance costs. However, it is only supported by Radeon Polaris / Vega / Navi graphics cards and only under Microsoft Windows 10. An independent open-source project has implemented contrast adaptive sharpening support for Vulkan that is similar to Radeon Image Sharpening but will work for any Vulkan-enabled GPU -- including NVIDIA GPUs.

  • MSM+Freedreno Driver Stack Adding Support For The Adreno 510 GPU

    While the MSM+Freedreno open-source graphics driver stack already supports the Adreno 500 and 600 series, one of the GPUs not seeing support until now was the basic Adreno 510. Kernel patches are pending for A510 enablement while the Mesa support was already merged.

    The Adreno 510 is the graphics processor within the Snapdragon 650, 652, and 653 models and used in lower-end devices. With the kernel and Mesa patches, the Adreno 510 is now working on the likes of the Sony Xperia X and X Compact smartphones.

  • AMD Lands Greater Direct State Access Support Within Mesa

    Landing this week in Mesa 19.3-devel were more functions being implemented around the big OpenGL EXT_direct_state_access extension.

    OpenGL's direct state access functions are intended to allow more OpenGL state to be accessed/updated directly aside form the selector commands. Using EXT_direct_state_access allows for various efficiency improvements.

Graphics: Gallium3D and AMDGPU

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Gallium3D's Mesa State Tracker Sees "Mega Cleanup" For NIR In Mesa 19.3

    AMD developer Marek Olšák has landed a "mega cleanup" to the Gallium3D Mesa state tracker code around its NIR intermediate representation handling.

    As part of getting the NIR support in good enough shape for default usage by the RadeonSI driver, Marek has been working on a number of clean-ups involving the common Gallium / Mesa state tracker code for NIR.

  • AMDGPU DC Looks To Have PSR Squared Away - Power-Savings For Newer AMD Laptops

    It looks like as soon as Linux 5.5 is where the AMDGPU kernel driver could be ready with Panel Self Refresh (PSR) support for enabling this power-savings feature on newer AMD laptops.

    While Intel's Linux driver stack has been supporting Panel Self Refresh for years, the AMD support in their open-source Linux driver code has been a long time coming. We've seen them working towards the support since Raven Ridge and now it appears the groundwork has been laid and they are ready to flip it on within the Display Core "DC" code.

The Spectre Mitigation Impact For Intel Ice Lake With Core i7-1065G7

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering if -- or how much -- of a performance impact mitigations still make regarding Spectre for Intel's long-awaited 10nm+ Ice Lake processors, here is the rundown on the mitigation state and the performance impact.

One of the areas that Phoronix readers have requested testing on with the recent purchase of the Dell XPS 7390 with Core i7 1065G7 is regarding the mitigation state and performance. Ice Lake with its Sunny Cove microarchitecture -- similar to Cascade Lake -- is no longer affected by Meltdown, MDS, or L1TF / Foreshadow.

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Cascade Lake vs. Rome With MrBayes, dav1d 0.5, OSPray, SVT-VP9, OIDn + Other Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While swapping around CPUs for the AMD EPYC vs. Intel Xeon Cascade Lake testing of Facebook's RocksDB enterprise workload testing, I also took the opportunity for running some other recently updated test profiles on these EPYC/Xeon parts under test.

These newest results shouldn't be particularly surprising but are primarily just benchmark results for some updated versions of existing tests. With recently a number of updated test profiles on OpenBenchmarking.org against the upstream programs under test, here are simply those latest performance numbers when running on the dual Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 and the AMD EPYC 7601 Naples and EPYC 7502 / 7642 / 7742 Rome processors all in 2P configurations. The setups were the same as from the RocksDB testing with running the newly-minted Ubuntu 19.10.

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Graphics Stack: PTS, Libinput and NVIDIA 440.26 Beta Linux Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.2 Milestone 1 Released With Updates For macOS Benchmarking

    The first development snapshot of Phoronix Test Suite 9.2-Hurdal is now available ahead of the stable release later this quarter.

    It's been just one month since the big Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 release with a new result viewer, graphing improvements, and other result viewing enhancements and lower-level improvements. With Phoronix Test Suite 9.2 as the Q4'2019 release will be more evolutionary improvements.

  • libinput and tablet pad keys

    Upcoming in libinput 1.15 is a small feature to support Wacom tablets a tiny bit better. If you look at the higher-end devices in Wacom's range, e.g. the Cintiq 27QHD you'll notice that at the top right of the device are three hardware-buttons with icons. Those buttons are intended to open the config panel, the on-screen display or the virtual keyboard. They've been around for a few years and supported in the kernel for a few releases. But in userspace, they events from those keys were ignored, casted out in the wild before eventually running out of electrons and succumbing to misery. Well, that's all changing now with a new interface being added to libinput to forward those events.

    Step back a second and let's look at the tablet interfaces. We have one for tablet tools (styli) and one for tablet pads. In the latter, we have events for rings, strips and buttons. The latter are simply numerically ordered, so button 1 is simply button 1 with no special meaning. Anything more specific needs to be handled by the compositor/client side which is responsible for assigning e.g. keyboard shortcuts to those buttons.

  • libinput and button scrolling locks

    For a few years now, libinput has provided button scrolling. Holding a designated button down and moving the device up/down or left/right creates the matching scroll events. We enable this behaviour by default on some devices (e.g. trackpoints) but it's available on mice and some other devices. Users can change the button that triggers it, e.g. assign it to the right button. There are of course a couple of special corner cases to make sure you can still click that button normally but as I said, all this has been available for quite some time now.

  • NVIDIA have released the big new Linux Beta driver 440.26 today

    Today NVIDIA released the 440.26 Beta driver for Linux with a number of new features, enhancements and a few interesting bug fixes.

  • NVIDIA 440.26 Beta Linux Driver Brings HDMI 2.1 VRR, VP9 VDPAU Decode + Much More

    NVIDIA today introduced their first beta driver in the 440 Linux branch and it's quite an exciting release!

    The NVIDIA 440.26 Linux beta driver is out this morning and it's bringing with it many new/improved features. There is now VP9 video decoding for VDPAU, HDMI 2.1 VRR for G-SYNC Compatible, and more.

AMD EPYC vs. Intel Xeon Cascadelake With Facebook's RocksDB Database

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the benchmarks earlier this month looking at PostgreSQL 12.0 on AMD EPYC Rome versus Intel Xeon Cascade Lake there was interest from Phoronix readers in wondering how well Rome is doing for other modern enterprise database workloads. One of those workloads that was recently added to the Phoronix Test Suite / OpenBenchmarking.org is Facebook's RocksDB, the company's embedded database that is forked from Google LevelDB. With RocksDB being designed to exploit many CPU cores and modern SSD storage, here are some benchmarks looking at how the Xeon Platinum 8280 stacks up against various new AMD EPYC 7002 series processors.

RocksDB is a key-value embedded database solution that Facebook has been working on since 2012 in taking Google's LevelDB to the next level of performance on modern CPU/SSD servers. RocksDB is in turn also used by companies like LinkedIn, Airbnb, Pinterest, Rakuten, Uber, and others.

With RocksDB having its own performance-focused built-in benchmarks, it makes for some interesting performance comparisons on these server CPUs given its growing presence in the enterprise. Those unfamiliar with RocksDB can learn more at RocksDB.org.

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Graphics: Libdrm, AMDGPU, AR/VR and Gallium3D

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Libdrm 2.4.100 Released With Bits For Intel Elkhart Lake, Tiger Lake Graphics

    AMD open-source developer Marek Olšák on Wednesday released libdrm 2.4.100 as the newest feature update to this Mesa DRM library.

    On the AMD front there are a number of RAS tests added, a new amdgpu_cs_query_reset_state2 interface, and other expanded AMDGPU test coverage.

  • AMDGPU GFX9+ Format Modifiers Being Worked On For Better DCC Handling

    RADV Vulkan driver developer Bas Nieuwenhuizen of Google has ventured into kernel space in working on format modifiers support for Vega/GFX9 and newer.

    This DRM format modifiers support for GFX9+ is being worked on for helping to evaluate when delta color compression (DCC) can be used and any other requirements around that DCC handling. Bas explained, "This is particularly useful to determine if we can use DCC, and whether we need an extra display compatible DCC metadata plane."

  • Free software support for virtual and augmented reality

    A talk at the recent X.Org Developers Conference in Montréal, Canada looked at support for "XR" in free software. XR is an umbrella term that includes both virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). In the talk, Joey Ferwerda and Christoph Haag from Collabora gave an overview of XR and the Monado project that provides support for those types of applications.

    Ferwerda started by defining the term "HMD", which predates VR and AR. It is a head-mounted display, which basically means "taking a screen and some sensors and duct-taping it to your face". All of the devices that are being used for XR are HMDs. They typically include some kind of tracking system to determine the position and orientation of the HMD itself. Multiple different technologies, including inertial measurement units (IMUs), photodiodes, lasers, and cameras, are used to do the tracking depending on the device and its use case.

    AR is intended to augment the real world with extra information; the user sees the real world around them, but various kinds of status and additional data is tagged to objects or locations in their view of the world. AR is a rather over-hyped technology these days, he said. The general idea is that users would wear glasses that would augment their view in some fashion, but, unfortunately, what most people think of as AR is Pokémon Go.

    VR uses two screens, one for each eye, to create a 3D world that the user inhabits and can interact with in some fashion. Instead of seeing the real world, the user sees a completely separate world. There are two words that are often used to describe the feel of VR, he said: "presence" and "immersion". That means users are aware of themselves as being part of the VR environment.

    XR encompasses both. Ferwerda said that he is not really sure what the "X" stands for; he has heard "cross reality" and "mixed reality" for XR. Haag said that "extended reality" was another definition that he had heard.

  • Intel Now Aiming For Gallium3D OpenGL Default For Mesa 20.0

    For the better part of two years now Intel has been working on this new "Iris" Gallium3D driver for supporting Broadwell "Gen8" graphics and newer as the eventual replacement to their long-standing i965 classic driver. With Tiger Lake "Gen12" Xe graphics, it's in fact Iris Gallium3D only. In our testing of Broadwell through the *lakes, this Gallium3D driver has been working out terrific on Mesa 19.2 stable and Mesa 19.3 development. But it looks like Intel is going to play it safe and punt the default change-over to next quarter's Mesa 20.0 cycle.

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Affecting both the Linux 4.15 kernel used in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04.6 LTS (Xenial Xerus) systems, the new security patch fixed an improperly implemented Spectre mitigation in the ptrace susbsystem (CVE-2019-15902), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. It also addresses a buffer overread (CVE-2019-15918) discovered that the SMB networking file system implementation, which could allow an attacker to expose sensitive information (kernel memory), two flaws (CVE-2019-15117 and CVE-2019-15118) discovered in the USB audio driver that may allow a physically proximate attacker to crash the system, and a flaw (CVE-2019-14821) in the KVM hypervisor implementation that let a local attacker to crash the system. Read more

Leftovers: MX-19, Versalogic and Security

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    We are pleased to offer MX-19 for your use. As usual, this iso includes the latest updates from debian 10.1 (buster), antiX and MX repos.

  • Compact Apollo Lake SBC aims sky high

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  • Password lessons: Longer is better, so is salt

    Infosec pros who had no idea of how easily a stolen list of hashed passwords could be cracked got a sobering lesson at this month’s SecTor security conference in Toronto. There, Will Hunt, co-founder of the U.K. based In.security consulting firm, casually talked of systems that can be built around a common (about $1,500) Nvidea GTX 2080 graphics card that could make 100 billion guesses a second in a brute force attack.

Unix Celebrates 50 Years

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