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Graphics/Benchmarks

Vulkan vs. OpenGL Performance For Linux Games

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

It has been a while since last publishing some Linux GPU driver benchmarks focused explicitly on the OpenGL vs. Vulkan performance, but that changed today with a fresh look at the performance between these two Khronos graphics APIs when tested with AMD and NVIDIA hardware on the latest RadeonSI/RADV and NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers.

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AMD Graphics: AMDKFD, AMDGPU

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • Raven Ridge Support Posted For AMDKFD Compute Driver

    Felix Kuehling of AMD sent out the remaining six patches for getting the AMD Raven Ridge (Ryzen APUs) working with the AMDKFD kernel compute driver so that the ROCm/OpenCL user-space compute stack can be run on these new APUs.

  • Radeon RX Vega Display Regression Fix Heading To Linux 4.18 Git

    If you have been part of the group of Radeon RX Vega Linux users trying out Linux 4.18 and finding your display no longer lights up, heading to Linux 4.18 Git should be a fix for at least some of the users.

    Sent out on Friday was a batch of AMDGPU DRM-Fixes-4.18. It's just three fixes, but two of them are pertaining to display problems and the other a segmentation fault if the GPU does not power up properly when resuming the system.

Graphics: Libinput, Mir, Wayland and Release of Mesa 18.1.4

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Libinput Gets Reworked Trackpoint Acceleration

    Peter Hutterer at Red Hat is trying again to get trackpoint acceleration performing nicely under the libinput library so trackpoints behave nicely across Wayland, X.Org, and Mir systems.

    Hutterer believes now that libinput's previous trackpoint acceleration code was "simply broken", but he believes this new code is on the right track and supports a wider configuration range.

  • libinput has a new trackpoint acceleration

    Just a heads-up, I just merged a branch that fixes trackpoint acceleration
    in libinput. The previous approach was simply broken, the new one is quite
    similar to what we had before anyway - calculating speed from the deltas and
    applying the acceleration curve from that. The curve is adjusted for
    trackpoints with a relatively wide configurable range.

  • Mir 0.32.1 Released With Launcher For Internal Wayland Clients, Fixes

    Canonical developers working on Mir have prepared the release of Mir 0.32.1 with a few fixes and improvements off the recent release of Mir 0.32.

    The Mir abstraction library (libmiral) now has a launcher for internal Wayland clients and the MirAL shell has reinstated the "spinner" in Wayland for when starting the shell. There are also several bug fixes pertaining to Mir's Wayland and Mesa support in this point release.

  • Wayland 1.16 & Weston 5.0 Reach Alpha

    Samsung's Derek Foreman has announced the alpha release of Wayland 1.16 as well as the Weston 5.0 reference compositor.

    As is often the case with recent Wayland releases, they are not all that large. Wayland 1.16 Alpha does away with the deprecated wl_global definition, fixes various oddities, the Wayland code generator now supports foreign enums, and updated contribution documentation.

  • mesa 18.1.4

    Hi list,

    Mesa 18.1.4 is now available for download.

    In this release we have:
    - Several fixes for i965
    - Several fixes for anv
    - A few fixes each for radeonsi, glx, the glsl compiler, the autotools build,
    nir, st/dri, and r600

    Dylan

  • Mesa 18.1.4 Released With Fixes For Intel & Radeon Drivers

    For those abiding by Mesa stable releases, Mesa 18.1.4 is now available -- in time for updating prior to any weekend Linux gaming or other activities -- for these open-source OpenGL/Vulkan driver components.

    Mesa 18.1.4 truth be told isn't all that of an exciting release, unless you happened to be affected by any of the just over two dozen fixes incorporated into this timed point release.

Windows Server 2016 vs. FreeBSD 11.2 vs. 8 Linux Distributions Performance Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent releases of FreeBSD 11.2, Scientific Linux 6.10, openSUSE Leap 15, and other distribution updates in the past quarter, here are some fresh benchmarks of eight different Linux distributions compared to FreeBSD 11.2 and Microsoft Windows Server 2016. The tested Linux platforms for this go-around were CentOS 7.5, Clear Linux 23610, Debian 9.4, Fedora Server 28, openSUSE leap 15.0, Scientific Linux 6.10, Scientific Linux 7.5, and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

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Linux Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vega 20 Support Added To RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver

    With the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel release due out in August there is the AMDGPU kernel driver support for Vega 20, the yet-to-be-released Vega GPU said to be the 7nm part launching later this year in Radeon Instinct products and featuring 32GB of HBM2 and adding some new deep learning instructions. Now the RadeonSI Gallium3D user-space driver for OpenGL within Mesa has Vega 20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan 8-Bit / Renderpass2 / Conditional Render

    NVIDIA developers today released the 396.24.10 driver, their latest beta driver for Linux focused on the latest Vulkan innovations and improvements and is joined by the Windows 398.58 driver.

    The NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux driver (and 398.58 beta for Windows) are focused on delivering the functionality added with the recent Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update.

Linux Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vega 20 Support Added To RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver

    With the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel release due out in August there is the AMDGPU kernel driver support for Vega 20, the yet-to-be-released Vega GPU said to be the 7nm part launching later this year in Radeon Instinct products and featuring 32GB of HBM2 and adding some new deep learning instructions. Now the RadeonSI Gallium3D user-space driver for OpenGL within Mesa has Vega 20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan 8-Bit / Renderpass2 / Conditional Render

    NVIDIA developers today released the 396.24.10 driver, their latest beta driver for Linux focused on the latest Vulkan innovations and improvements and is joined by the Windows 398.58 driver.

    The NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux driver (and 398.58 beta for Windows) are focused on delivering the functionality added with the recent Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update.

96-core NanoPi Fire3 cluster computer blows past RPi rigs in benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Cluster computer projects are increasingly looking beyond the Raspberry Pi to build devices with faster cluster-friendly SBCs. Here’s a 96-core monster that taps the octa-core NanoPi Fire3.

Cluster computers constructed of Raspberry Pi SBCs have been around for years, ranging from supercomputer-like behemoths to simple hobbyist rigs. More recently, we’ve seen cluster designs that use other open-spec hacker boards, many of which offer higher computer power and faster networking at the same or lower price. Farther below, we’ll examine one recent open source design from Paul Smith at Climbers.net that combines 12 octa-core NanoPi-Fire3 SBCs for a 96-core cluster.

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Also: Low-profile Apollo Lake Mini-ITX board runs Linux

The NVIDIA/AMD Linux GPU Gaming Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Dollar For July 2018

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Graphics/Benchmarks

In part with GPU demand by crypto-currency miners waning a bit, NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics card availability at retailers has been improving in recent weeks as well as seeing less inflated prices than just recently had been the case. Given the better availability and stabilizing prices, here is a fresh look of the current line-up of GeForce and Radeon graphics cards under Ubuntu Linux using the newest AMD/NVIDIA drivers and also providing performance-per-dollar metrics given current retail prices.

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Linux Kernel: VKMS, CAKE, Xen and AMDVLK

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Virtual Kernel Mode-Setting Driver Being Added To Linux 4.19

    Linux 4.19 is shaping up to be a pretty exciting kernel release for what is expected to be the last version before Linux 5.0.

    Adding to the list of Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) improvements in Linux 4.19, VKMS has been added to Linux 4.19. The VKMS driver is the virtual kernel mode-setting effort, most recently worked on as part of this year's Google Summer of Code.

    The virtual KMS driver is a basic KMS driver exposing a CRTC/encoder/connector/plane that can be used for headless machines to run an X.Org Server or even Wayland and serves for virtual display purposes without necessa

  • Networking CAKE Is Ready For Tasting With Linux 4.19

    For those maintaining their own home-built Linux router, Linux 4.19 is going to be pretty exciting: CAKE Qdisc has been merged into net-next, making it a feature for this next kernel cycle.

  • Latest Xen Hypervisor Arrives Late, but Greatly Improved
  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Now Supports Direct Display Mode For VR HMDs

    The AMDVLK open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux driver has seen its latest weekly code drop that brings with it some of the extensions needed for supporting the Steam VR experience.

    The AMDVLK driver now supports VK_EXT_direct_mode_display and VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extensions. These extensions are needed so a Vulkan application/compositor can take exclusive control of display(s), such as the use-case for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs) with being controlled by the SteamVR compositor. The VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extension is needed for acquiring control of a display that is associated with an X11 screen from the X.Org Server.

Linux Kernel, Linux Foundation and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The final step for huge-page swapping

    For many years, Linux system administrators have gone out of their way to avoid swapping. The advent of nonvolatile memory is changing the equation, though, and swapping is starting to look interesting again — if it can perform well enough. That is not the case in current kernels, but a longstanding project to allow the swapping of transparent huge pages promises to improve that situation considerably. That work is reaching its final stage and might just enter the mainline soon.

    The use of huge pages can improve the performance of the system significantly, so the kernel works hard to make them available. The transparent huge pages mechanism collects application data into huge pages behind the scenes, and the memory-management subsystem as a whole works hard to ensure that appropriately sized pages are available. When it comes time to swap out a process's pages, though, all of that work is discarded, and a huge page is split back into hundreds of normal pages to be written out. When swapping was slow and generally avoided, that didn't matter much, but it is a bigger problem if one wants to swap to a fast device and maintain performance.

  • Revisiting the MAP_SHARED_VALIDATE hack

    One of the the most commonly repeated mistakes in system-call design is a failure to check for unknown flags wherever flags are accepted. If there is ever a point where callers can get away with setting unknown flags, then adding new flags becomes a hazardous act. In the case of mmap(), though, developers found a clever way around this problem. A recent discussion has briefly called that approach into question, though, and raised the issue of what constitutes a kernel regression. No changes are forthcoming as a result, but the discussion does provide an opportunity to look at both the specific hack and how the kernel community decides whether a change is a regression or not.

    Back in 2017, several developers were trying to figure out a way to safely allow direct user-space access to files stored on nonvolatile memory devices. The hardware allows this memory to be addressed directly by the processor, but any changes could go astray if the filesystem were to move blocks around at the same time. The solution that arose was a new mmap() flag called MAP_SYNC. When a file is mapped with this flag set (and the file is stored on a nonvolatile memory device), the kernel will take extra care to ensure that access to the mapping and filesystem-level changes will not conflict with each other. As far as applications are concerned, using this flag solves the problem.

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  • Mesa 18.1.4 release candidate

    Mesa 18.1.4 is planned for release this Friday, July 13th, at or around 10 AM PDT.

  • Mesa 18.1.4 Being Prepared With Intel Fixes & A Couple For Radeon

    Another routine Mesa 18.1. point release is being prepared while waiting for the August debut of the Mesa 18.2 feature update.

    Dylan Baker, the Mesa 18.1 release manager and his first stab at the task, has announced the Mesa 18.1.4 release candidate today. In its current form, Mesa 18.1.4 is comprised of just over two dozen patches.

  • Pre-AMDGPU xf86-video-ati X.Org Driver Sees A Round Of Improvements

    It's rare in recent years to have anything to report on xf86-video-ati, the X.Org driver for the display/2D experience for pre-GCN Radeon graphics cards. But this week has been a large batch of fixes and improvements for those using this DDX driver with pre-HD7000 series hardware.

    Longtime Radeon Linux driver developer Michel Dänzer has landed a number of commits already this week of various fixes/cleanups, some of which were inspired by the xf86-video-amdgpu DDX driver that is used for current-generation hardware with the AMDGPU kernel driver (unless using xf86-video-modesetting...).

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