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Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa 19.2.5

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hi list,

I'd like to announce mesa 19.2.5. This is a return to our regularly scheduled
release cadence, featuring a reasonable number of fixes. In general things are
slowing down on the 19.2 branch, and things are starting to look pretty nice.

There's a little bit over everything in here, with anv and radeonsi standing out
as the two biggest components getting changes, but core mesa, core gallium,
llvmpipe, nir, egl, i965, tgsi, st/mesa, spirv, and the Intel compiler also
fixes in this release.

Dylan


Shortlog
========

Ben Crocker (1):
      llvmpipe: use ppc64le/ppc64 Large code model for JIT-compiled shaders

Brian Paul (1):
      Call shmget() with permission 0600 instead of 0777

Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (1):
      spirv: Don't leak GS initialization to other stages

Danylo Piliaiev (1):
      i965: Unify CC_STATE and BLEND_STATE atoms on Haswell as a workaround

Dylan Baker (4):
      docs: Add SHA256 sum for for 19.2.4
      cherry-ignore: Update for 19.2.4 cycle
      docs: Add relnotes for 19.2.5
      VERSION: bump for 19.2.5

Eric Engestrom (1):
      egl: fix _EGL_NATIVE_PLATFORM fallback

Ian Romanick (2):
      nir/algebraic: Add the ability to mark a replacement as exact
      nir/algebraic: Mark other comparison exact when removing a == a

Illia Iorin (1):
      mesa/main: Ignore filter state for MS texture completeness

Jason Ekstrand (1):
      anv: Stop bounds-checking pushed UBOs

Lepton Wu (1):
      gallium: dri2: Use index as plane number.

Lionel Landwerlin (3):
      anv: invalidate file descriptor of semaphore sync fd at vkQueueSubmit
      anv: remove list items on batch fini
      anv/wsi: signal the semaphore in the acquireNextImage

Marek Olšák (3):
      st/mesa: fix Sanctuary and Tropics by disabling ARB_gpu_shader5 for them
      tgsi_to_nir: fix masked out image loads
      tgsi_to_nir: handle PIPE_FORMAT_NONE in image opcodes

Paulo Zanoni (1):
      intel/compiler: fix nir_op_{i,u}*32 on ICL

Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (3):
      radeonsi: disable sdma for gfx10
      radeonsi: tell the shader disk cache what IR is used
      radeonsi: fix shader disk cache key


git tag: mesa-19.2.5

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Also: Mesa 19.2.5 Released With Intel Vulkan + RadeonSI Driver Fixes

Graphics and GPUS: NVIDIA, Intel and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • CUDA 10.2 Released With VMM APIs, libcu++ As Parallel Standard C++ Library For GPUs

    NVIDIA has released CUDA 10.2 for SuperComputing 19 week. CUDA 10.2 comes with some interesting changes, including to be the last release that will support Apple's macOS and the introduction of a standard C++ library for GPUs.

  • Intel Iris Plus Ice Lake Graphics Run Great With Mesa 19.3's Gallium3D Driver

    While Mesa 19.3 was the original target for switching to the Intel Gallium3D driver by default for Broadwell and newer, they shifted that goal to Mesa 20.0 to allow more time for testing and ensuring a bug-free experience as users transition from the classic "i965" driver over to "Iris" Gallium3D. But even so if running with Mesa 19.3 today it means better performance for Ice Lake as well as Gen8 and Gen9 hardware too.

  • Vulkan post-processing layer vkBasalt has a new release up with SMAA support

    Continuing to boost the feature set of the post-processing layer for vkBasalt, a new release is up and it appears we missed a few smaller in-between releases too.

    Version 0.2.0 was released yesterday, adding in support for SMAA which is a higher-quality form of anti-aliasing which can be enabled in the config file. With that in vkBasalt now supports: Contrast Adaptive Sharpening, Fast Approximate Anti-Aliasing and Enhanced Subpixel Morphological Anti-Aliasing so it's advancing quite quickly.

Linux 5.4 Is Big For AMD Radeon Users From New GPU Support To Slightly Faster Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With Linux 5.4 due to be released this coming Sunday, 24 November, one of the big "winners" of this next kernel are AMD Radeon customers. Linux 5.4 brings support for new GPUs as well as better performance for existing graphics cards. Here are some fresh benchmarks of the performance wins as a result of the LRU bulk moves functionality.

Linux 5.4 brings many exciting changes/improvements but in particular for the AMDGPU DRM driver it's particularly exciting. As outlined previously in our Linux 5.4 feature overview some of the AMD work includes...

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Graphics and Games: Intel, Vulkan, Trine and Google Stadia

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Intel's Graphics Driver DoS Fix Last Week Has Hurt Power Consumption

    While the patches overnight about "substantial" improvement in power usage for Intel graphics on Linux were exciting on first look, it's less so now as it turns out last week's graphics driver security fixes is what regressed the Intel graphics power-savings.

    During last Tuesday's round of Intel security disclosures where there was a fix for denial of service in the Intel graphics driver, it turns out that the CVE-2019-0154 fix is what regressed power usage. The potential Denial of Service vulnerability was about unprivileged users being able to cause a DoS by reading select memory regions when the graphics hardware is in certain low-power states.

  • vkBasalt 0.2 Released With SMAA, Other Vulkan Post Processing Layer Enhancements

    The open-source vkBasalt project was started as a layer implementing Contrast Adaptive Sharpening (akin to Radeon Image Sharpening) for any Vulkan-using GPU/driver/software. The vkBasalt project then picked up FXAA support for this Vulkan post-processing layer while now a new release is out with more functionality added.

    The vkBasalt 0.2 release is out today and adds support for enhanced sub-pixel morphological anti-aliasing (SMAA) for higher-quality anti-aliasing than FXAA. SMAA is an image-based implementation of MLAA. This release also allows for multiple visual effects to be activated at once where as previously only any one of these image enhancing features could be active at a time.

  • Flax Engine Ported To Linux + Vulkan Rendering Support

    Flax Engine is the latest game engine seeing native Linux support and in the process the renderer also picked up Vulkan support.

    Flax Engine is a lesser known game engine that now works on Linux alongside Windows and Xbox One. After two years in development, the open beta release of Flax is expected soon.

  • The sad case of Trine on Mesa and Linux in 2019

    A year or so back I was planning on writing a congratulatory article to show my appreciation to Dave Airlie for fixing a long standing bug in Mesa that prevented users of older AMD Radeon HD cards from enjoying Trine Enchanted Edition on the free graphics stack. Bug 91808 resulted in a variety of graphical artifacts which, while not interfering with the gameplay, still put me off using that version of Trine.

    After several years and a great deal of evident frustration on his part, Airlie was able to track down the root of the problem and at long last was able to push a fix to master in May 2018. Airlie and developers like him are often the unsung heroes of FOSS development, and I wanted to give him a well deserved public pat on the back for his effort in fixing a bug which would only have affected such a small number of people.

    Unfortunately my research into this led me down an entirely different rabbit hole when I discovered the report for Bug 66067. A much more subtle misrendering of the game's colours and lighting, this bug is present in both Trine 2 and Trine Enchanted Edition and affects all Mesa users. Unlike the previous instance where it was an issue in the drivers that was the culprit, this issue is present in the game binaries themselves.

  • Google Stadia is out now for early adopters, well a few anyway

    Today, the Google Stadia streaming service officially launched for those who picked up the Founder or Premier Edition.

    Well, sort of anyway. Some people have it, a lot of people don't, we certainly don't and it appears the team at Stadia give different answers to different people on when you will actually be able to access it. I've also seen plenty of people whose orders have been cancelled without warning or explanation. Even worse still, some people have been sent their hardware without an access code. Google have, so far, done a terrible job at communicating on Stadia and so the initial launch doesn't seem to have gone down well at all.

Intel Haswell To Ice Lake Laptop Performance Benchmarks On Ubuntu 19.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With the many Intel Ice Lake Linux benchmarks we began publishing over the past month since picking up a Dell XPS with Core i7-1065G7, there have been many benchmarks compared to the likes of the Core i7 Whiskey Lake and Kaby Lake processors. For those curious how the performance stacks up going further back, here are some Ubuntu 19.10 laptop benchmarks putting it up against the likes of Core i7 Haswell and Broadwell processors.

This article offers a look at the Ubuntu 19.10 + Linux 5.3 performance on six different laptops including the Dell XPS 7390 Ice Lake laptop and various other laptops I had available for testing.

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Graphics: AMD, Intel and NEMO-UX

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Announces Radeon Pro W5700 RDNA Workstation Graphics Card

    In addition to AMD's SC19 announcements yesterday, their embargo just lifted on the Radeon Pro W5700 as their first 7nm workstation graphics card build on their new RDNA architecture.

    The Radeon Pro W5700 is built on their RDNA architecture, supports GDDR6 video memory, and is said to deliver up to 18% better efficiency than NVIDIA's competition. The Radeon Pro W5700 is also AMD's first graphics card featuring a USB-C connector for monitors and VR HMDs.

  • AMD Lands EXT_direct_state_access For OpenGL Compatibility Contexts In Mesa

    In recent weeks AMD driver developers have been working on EXT_direct_state_access improvements within Mesa and following their latest code push today now support the D.S.A. extension for OpenGL compatibility profile contexts.

    OpenGL Direct State Access allows for various efficiency improvements in allowing the modification of objects without needing to bind them to the context. More background information on the direct state access semantics can be found via the OpenGL Wiki.

  • Intel Linux Graphics Driver Patches For Fast Soft-RC6 Yield Big Energy Use Improvement

    Longtime open-source Intel Linux graphics driver developer Chris Wilson has sent out a set of 19 patches for what he calls fast soft-RC6 support and is a "substantial" improvement over the current driver code for Intel graphics power-savings.

    Chris simply wrote at the start of the patch series, "In my very simple testing of scrolling through firefox, this brings up back into line with HW rc6 energy usage, a substantial improvement over current -tip."

  • NEMO-UX Vanishes As What Was A Wayland Shell Designed For Large, Multi-User Surfaces

    Over the years there have been many interesting Wayland projects to take flight focused on new and interesting use-cases. One of these interesting (and experimental) Wayland compositors was NEMO-UX focused on providing a shell for computing environments that span large surfaces like virtual chalkboards or tabletops.

    Five years ago this week we covered this futuristic, multi-user Wayland experience. While the concept is still interesting and large format, multi-user computing remains a niche area, NEMO-UX appears to sadly no longer exist.

23-Way Graphics Card Comparison With Shadow of the Tomb Raider On Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

The Linux port of Shadow of the Tomb Raider basically recommends at least an AMD GCN 1.2 or newer graphics card or GeForce GTX 680 or newer, basically the bare requirements on Linux for having a Vulkan driver out-of-the-box. It should also be possible getting a GCN 1.0/1.1 graphics card working if opting to use the AMDGPU DRM driver rather than Radeon DRM as needed for Vulkan driver support. But Feral recommends at least a Radeon RX 480 Polaris graphics card for decent performance. Current Intel graphics are not fast enough to run this game on Linux.

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Zink Benchmarks - Mesa OpenGL Running Over Vulkan

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With the upcoming Mesa 19.3 release one of the big new features is the "Zink" driver that provides a Mesa OpenGL implementation over Vulkan. This in theory allows for a generic OpenGL driver running over Vulkan hardware drivers, but there is a lot of work ahead before it's really a viable option.

Zink is one of the OpenGL-over-Vulkan options to date that in the future could make it so hardware vendors don't need to maintain OpenGL drivers for future hardware generations but instead could just focus on Vulkan and leave it to these generic implementations. However, a lot of work is needed before it's really to that state in being able to replace existing hardware OpenGL drivers.

With Mesa 19.3, Zink only fully supports OpenGL 2.1. Support for OpenGL 3.x/4.x and OpenGL ES 3.0 is still a work-in-progress likely taking at least a few months to get there if not longer. When trying to launch even the Steam client with Zink, Steam was simply crashing.

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Firefox vs. Chrome Browser Performance On Intel Ice Lake + Power/Memory Usage Tests

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Using Firefox 70 (including WebRender) and Google Chrome 78, here are our latest round of Linux web browser benchmarks tested on the Dell XPS Ice Lake laptop. Making this round of Linux browser benchmarking more interesting is also including power consumption and RAM usage metrics for the different browser benchmarks.

For those wondering about whether Firefox or Chrome makes the most sense for Linux laptops, these benchmarks from the Dell XPS with Intel Core i7-1065G7 will hopefully be useful.

Ubuntu 19.10 with the Linux 5.3 kernel was running on this Intel Ice Lake laptop while using the official builds of Mozilla Firefox 70.0 (both out of the box and with WebRender) and Google Chrome 78. The AC system power consumption was monitored on battery and the total RAM usage was being monitored throughout testing as well. All of the benchmarking was carried out using the Phoronix Test Suite.

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Linux and Graphics: Kernel Headers, Linux 5.5, NUVIA and Wayland

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • What's a kernel headers package anyway

    I've written before about what goes into Fedora's kernel-devel package. Briefly, it consists of files that come out of the kernel's build process that are needed to build kernel modules.

    In contrast to kernel-devel, the headers package is for userspace programs. This package provides #defines and structure definitions for use by userspace programs to be compatible with the kernel. The system libc comes with a set of headers for platform independent libc purposes (think printf and the like) whereas the kernel headers are more focused on providing for the kernel API. There's often some overlap for things like system calls which are tied to both the libc and the kernel. Sometimes the decision to support them in one place vs the other comes down to developer choices.

    While the in-kernel API is not guaranteed to be stable, the userspace API must not be broken. There was an effort a few years ago to have a strict split between headers that are part of the userspace API and those that are for in-kernel use only.

    Unlike how kernel-devel gets packaged, there are proper make targets to generate the kernel-headers (thankfully). make headers_install will take care of all the magic. These headers get installed under /usr/include

  • Linux 5.5 To Finally Kill The Async Block Cipher API In Favor Of SKCIPHER

    The crypto code within the Linux kernel for the upcoming 5.5 cycle finishes converting the drivers to making full use of the four-year-old SKCIPHER interface so that the old ABLKCIPHER code can be removed.

    SKCIPHER was introduced in 2015 to the mainline kernel to ultimately replace BLKCIPHER/ABLKCIPHER. This "symmetric key cipher" interface is a generic encrypt/decrypt wrapper for ciphers.

  • NUVIA To Make Serious Play For New CPUs In The Datacenter, Hires Linux/OSS Veteran

    Making waves this afternoon is word of the NUVIA server CPU start-up landing its series A funding round and thus making more information known on this new silicon start-up.

  • WXRC Is The Wayland XR Compositor For VR Headsets

    Drew DeVault of Sway/WL-ROOTS notoriety and longtime Wayland developer Simon Ser have started development on WXRC, a new Wayland compositor.

    WXRC is the Wayland XR Compositor and is based on OpenXR and the open-source Monado implementation. This is better than the past Linux VR desktop efforts we've recently seen that relied on SteamVR. As of this week, WXRC has working 3D Wayland clients.

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