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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: Panfrost, VKD3D, ROCm and Super-Resolution

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Panfrost With Linux 5.10 To Support Mali GPU On Amlogic G12B SoCs

    Sent out on Monday were a last batch of drm-misc-next changes to queue for the Linux 5.10 merge window opening next month.

    This pull request wasn't too exciting given all of the other DRM changes queued over the past several weeks, but one notable addition was the open-source Arm Mali "Panfrost" DRM driver now supporting Amlogic hardware.

    New device quirks had to be introduced to the driver for providing compatibility with Amlogic G12B SoCs. There was quirk handling added around the PWR registers at GPU reset time and an IOMMU quirk that was needed for getting the Mali G52 on the Amlogic G12B SoCs behaving correctly.

  • VKD3D 1.2 Is Ready To Offer Better Direct3D 12 To Vulkan Support

    Patches pending for VKD3D take this Direct3D 12 to Vulkan translation library up to version 1.2. This library continues advancing in pushing along the D3D12-over-Vulkan performance primarily for Windows games on Linux just as DXVK has done for D3D9 through D3D11.

    With VKD3D 1.2 there is support for more Direct3D 12 functionality,libvkd3d-shader as its own standalone public library, new VKD3D_CONFIG / VKD3D_VULKAN_DEVICE environment variables among others for overriding different behavior, tessellation shaders support, support for using SPIR-V produced by libvkd3d-shader to be consumed by GL_ARB_gl_spirv, preliminary support for Shader Model 5.1 shaders, more shader instructions now handled, and various other changes.

  • Radeon ROCm 3.8 Released With Hipfort For Fortran On GPUs, Data Center Tool

    Version 3.8 of ROCm, the Radeon Open eCosystem, is now available. This release continues making more progress on preparing the ROCm graphics compute stack for the upcoming large AMD supercomputer deployments and other data center usage.

    ROCm 3.8 introduces the Hipfort interface library for accessing GPU kernels, which allows for interfacing via the Fortran programming language with Radeon GPUs. This Hipfort Fortran implementation is currently catering to GCC's Gfortran front-end.

  • Open Source meets Super Resolution, part 1

    Despite their great upscaling performance, deep learning backed Super-Resolution methods cannot be easily applied to real-world applications due to their heavy computational requirements. At Collabora we have addressed this issue by introducing an accurate and light-weight deep network for video super-resolution, running on a completely open source software stack using Panfrost, the free and open-source graphics driver for Mali GPUs. Here's an overview of Super Resolution, its purpose for image and video upscaling, and how our model came about.

    Internet streaming has experienced tremendous growth in the past few years, and continues to advance at a rapid pace. Streaming now accounts for over 60% of internet traffic and is expected to quadruple over the next five years.

    Video delivery quality depends critically on available network bandwidth. Due to bandwidth limitations, most video sources are compressed, resulting in image artifacts, noise, and blur. Quality is also degraded by routine image upscaling, which is required to match the very high pixel density of newer mobile devices.

    The upscaling community has provided us with many fundamental advances in video and image upscaling, from classic methods such as Nearest-Neighbor, Linear and Lanczos resampling. However, no fundamentally new methods have been introduced in over 20 years. Also, traditional algorithm-based upscaling methods lack fine detail and cannot remove defects and compression artifacts.

    All of this is changing thanks to the Deep Learning revolution. We now have a whole new class of techniques for state-of-the-art upscaling, called Deep Learning Super Resolution (DLSR).

Vulkan Graphics: Vulkan Portability Extension and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan Portability Extension 1.0 Now Shipping For Expanding Vulkan's Reach

    The Vulkan Portability Extension (VK_KHR_portability_subset) has been released as part of the effort by The Khronos Group in getting Vulkan running on as many platforms as possible, including the likes of Apple macOS/iOS.

    The VK_KHR_portability_subset extension is about getting Vulkan up and running on non-Vulkan APIs, as opposed to the success we have already seen in areas like getting OpenGL or Direct3D atop Vulkan. The VK_KHR_portability_subset extension makes it easier for the likes of GFX-RS and MoltenVK for getting Vulkan running on platforms like Apple's operating systems where Vulkan is not supported and thus having to reside on top of say the Apple Metal API.

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  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Dynamism

    In Vulkan, a pipeline object is bound to the graphics pipeline for a given command buffer when a draw is about to take place. This pipeline object contains information about the draw state, and any time that state changes, a different pipeline object must be created/bound.

    This is expensive.

    Some time ago, Antonio Caggiano did some work to cache pipeline objects, which lets zink reuse them once they’re created. This was great, because creating Vulkan objects is very costly, and we want to always be reusing objects whenever possible.

    Unfortunately, the core Vulkan spec has the number of viewports and scissor regions as both being part of the pipeline state, which means any time either one changes the number of regions (though both viewport and scissor region counts are the same for our purposes), we need a new pipeline.

Open-Source Vivante Driver In Some Cases Outperforming Proprietary Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks

One of the less talked about open-source graphics drivers talked about is Etnaviv as the reverse-engineered, community-based driver providing OpenGL/GLES support for Vivante graphics IP. While it's still working towards OpenGL ES 3.0 compliance, its performance is currently in some cases competitive -- and even outperforming -- the Vivante proprietary driver.

Christian Gmeiner who has been involved with the Etnaviv driver effort for years presented at last week's X.Org Developers Conference (XDC2020). There he talked about the progress on the driver, the support spanning from the GC600 through GC7000L series at present with i.MX8M, and its OpenGL ES 2 capabilities along with desktop OpenGL 1.3/2.0 support. OpenGL ES 3.0 support remains a work-in-progress.

Read more

Also: New OpenBenchmarking.org Features Enhance Discovering Popular + Reliable Tests

Running PlasmaShell with Vulkan

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Graphics/Benchmarks
KDE

QtQuick, in slightly more words, is a scene graph implementation. At a developer level we create abstract "Items" which might be some text or a rectangle etc or a picture. This in turn gets transformed into a tree of nodes with geometry, "materials" and transforms. In turn this gets translated into a big long stream of OpenGL instructions which we send to the graphic card.

Qt6 will see this officially change to sit on top of the "Render Hardware Interface" stack, that instead of always producing OpenGL, will support Vulkan, Metal and Direct3D natively. The super clever part about it is that custom shaders (low level fast drawing) are also abstracted; meaning we will write some GLSL and generate the relevant shader for each API without having to duplicate the work.

Read more

Also: Experiments Are Underway With Vulkan Powering The KDE Plasma Shell

Graphics: NVIDIA, Intel, AMD and Zink

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Graphics/Benchmarks

     
  • NVIDIA GeForce Now quietly starts working on Linux as the Avengers come to play

    If you use or have been following NVIDIA GeForce Now, the cloud gaming platform that delivers PC titles you already own from sources such as Steam and Epic Games to a multitude of devices, the latest development seems to have emerged silently. Spotted by the team at GamingonLinux, users of Linux can now, it seems, access GeForce Now in either Chromium of Google Chrome.

    Indeed, previously this tactic involved fudging user agents to make GeForce Now believe you were on a Chromebook, following the launch of the web client for Google's laptops. And it works just fine, I logged in and played some games with no issues on Ubuntu in both browsers. And just to double check, Firefox still shows an incompatible device error.

  • Intel Compute Runtime 20.37.17906 Brings Rocket Lake Support

    Intel's software team has released a new version of their Compute Runtime that provides OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero capabilities for their graphics hardware on Linux.

  • AMDGPU TMZ + HDCP Should Allow Widevine DRM To Behave Nicely With AMD Linux Systems

    Coming together this year for the mainline Linux kernel was the AMDGPU Trusted Memory Zone (TMZ) capability for encrypted video memory support with Radeon GPUs. This topic was talked about at this week's XDC2020 conference.

    AMDGPU TMZ prevents unauthorized applications from accessing the encrypted/trusted memory of an application. TMZ protects both reads and writes while leveraging an AES cipher. But while discrete Radeon GPUs can also support TMZ, for now the AMD Linux developers have just been focused on the capability for their APU platforms.

  • Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan Seeing Some 50~100% FPS Gains

    After working on getting the Zink OpenGL-over-Vulkan driver up to OpenGL 4.6 with still pending patches, former Samsung OSG engineer Mike Blumenkrantz has been making remarkable progress on the performance aspect as well.

    This generic Mesa OpenGL implementation that works atop Vulkan drivers is about to see much better performance. Blumenkrantz recently commented the performance was turning out better than expected but that was for micro-benchmarks. But now with more optimizations he is achieving even better results.

Graphics: Taiwins 0.2, Etnaviv, V3DV, Libre-SOC, X.Org/FreeDesktop.org and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Taiwins 0.2 is out
    Hi all,
    
    A long while ago [1]. I introduced the Taiwins wayland compositor. It was
    built upon libweston. It turned out despite my attempts, I couldn't get my
    patches to merge in libweston. Libweston has quite a few bugs and missing
    features to fit the role of a daily driver.
    
    These past few months, Taiwins was going through a long refactoring process
    in migrating from libweston. Today, taiwins uses a very thin layer of
    wlroots for hardware abstraction, the next release will target on removing
    the reliance of wlroots as well. Today it has the features of:
    
    - dynamic window management.
    - extensible and easy configuration through lua.
    - very efficient GL renderer, updates only the damages.
    - a widget system and you can create widgets through lua as well.
    - built-in shell and application launcher.
    - configurable theme.
    - emacs-like key sequence based binding system.
    - built-in profiler and rendering debugger.
    
    Along the way, I developed Twobjects [2], a backend agnostic wayland object
    implementation for compositors. This library implements basic wayland
    protocols as well as various other wayland protocols like 'xdg-shell' and
    many more. Using twobjects, you can focus on building your own unique
    features for the compositor and let it handle the most tedious protocol
    implementations.It doesn't expose everything as `wl_signals` like wlroots
    does, so you don't need to write additional glue code for it.
    
    Taiwins is still in development but missing features are getting less and
    less, you can check out its website https://taiwins.org or if you would
    like to help, check out the project page https://github.com/taiwins/taiwins
    for getting started.
    
    Thanks,
    Xichen
    
    
  • Taiwins 0.2 Released As Modular Wayland Compositor That Supports Lua Scripting

    Back in May the Taiwins Wayland compositor was announced as a compact compositor based on Libweston while Thursday marked its second release.

    With Taiwins 0.2 the switch was made from using libweston as a basis for the compositor to now using Sway's WLROOTS library. Libweston was dropped over open bugs and other issues and in part the ability to get patches easily merged back into upstream libweston. So with the shortcomings of the Weston library, Taiwins 0.2 is now running on WLROOTS. However, by the next release they hope to have their thin layer over WLROOTS removed so that library isn't needed either.

  • Etnaviv Gallium3D Adds On-Disk Shader Cache Support

    Etnaviv as the open-source, reverse-engineered OpenGL graphics driver for Vivante graphics IP now has support for an on-disk shader cache.

  • V3DV Developers Lay Out Plans For Upstreaming The Raspberry Pi 4 Vulkan Driver In Mesa

    Building off the V3DV driver talk at XDC2020 about this open-source Vulkan driver for the Raspberry Pi 4 driver, the Igalia developers responsible for this creation have laid out their plans on getting this driver upstream within Mesa.

    In a mailing list post today they note they are down to just 18 test cases failing for the Vulkan CTS while 106,776 tests are passing for this Vulkan Conformance Test Suite. Vulkan games like the respun versions of Quake 1-3 and OpenArena are working along with various game emulators. Various Vulkan demos also run well too.

  • Libre-SOC Still Persevering To Be A Hybrid CPU/GPU That's 100% Open-Source

    The project that started off as Libre-RISC-V with aims to be a Vulkan accelerator but then decided on the OpenPOWER ISA rather than RISC-V is still moving ahead under the "Libre-SOC" branding.

    Libre-SOC continues to be led by Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton and this week he presented both at the OpenPOWER Summit and X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2020) on his Libre-SOC dreams of having a 100% fully open SoC on both the software and hardware sides while being a hybrid CPU/GPU. Similar to the original plans when targeting RISC-V that it would effectively be a SoC but with new vector instructions optimized for graphics workloads, that's still the plan albeit now using OpenPOWER as a base.

  • X.Org Is Getting Their Cloud / Continuous Integration Costs Under Control

    You may recall from earlier this year that the X.Org/FreeDesktop.org cloud costs were growing out of control primarily due to their continuous integration setup. They were seeking sponsorships to help out with these costs but ultimately they've attracted new sponsors while also better configuring/optimizing their CI configuration in order to get those costs back at more manageable levels.

  • Intel Submits More Graphics Driver Updates For Linux 5.10

    Building off their earlier Intel graphics driver pull request of new material queuing ahead of the Linux 5.10 cycle, another round of updates were submitted on Friday.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Long Week

    Once again, I ended up not blogging for most of the week. When this happens, there’s one of two possibilities: I’m either taking a break or I’m so deep into some code that I’ve forgotten about everything else in my life including sleep.

    This time was the latter. I delved into the deepest parts of zink and discovered that the driver is, in fact, functioning only through a combination of sheer luck and a truly unbelievable amount of driver stalls that provide enough forced synchronization and slow things down enough that we don’t explode into a flaming mess every other frame.

    Oops.

    I’ve fixed all of the crazy things I found, and, in the process, made some sizable performance gains that I’m planning to spend a while blogging about in considerable depth next week.

    And when I say sizable, I’m talking in the range of 50-100% fps gains.

  • Watch the ACO shader compiler and Vulkan Ray Tracing talks from XDC 2020

    With XDC 2020 (X.Org Developers Conference) in full swing, we've been going over the various presentations to gather some interesting bits for you. Here's more on the ACO shader compiler and Vulkan Ray Tracing.

    You can find more info on XDC 2020 in the previous article, and be sure not to miss our round-up of Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais talk about Gamescope.

    More talks were done across yesterday, with the first one we're mentioning here being from Timur Kristóf who is currently a contractor for Valve who talked about ACO (the newer Mesa shader compiler for AMD graphics). The idea behind ACO which Valve announced back in 2019, for those not aware, is to give a smoother Linux gaming experience with less (or no) stuttering with Vulkan with faster compile times for shaders. Kristóf goes over lots of intricate details from being in the experimental stages to eventually the default in Mesa with it now having support across 5 different generations of AMD GPUs.

Graphics: Mesa 20.1.8 Released and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 20.1.8
    Hi all,
    
    I'd like to announce Mesa 20.1.8, the eighth bugfix release for the 20.1 branch.
    
    The next bugfix release is planned for 2 weeks from now, on 2020-09-30.
    
    Cheers,
    Eric
    
  • Mesa 20.1.8 Released While Waiting For Mesa 20.2

    Mesa 20.2 (or 20.2-RC5) didn't debut last week as intended, but for the interim the Mesa 20.1.x release cycle brought 20.1.8 on Wednesday and now it's been extended to having at least a ninth point release to allow more time until not only Mesa 20.2.0 to ship but Mesa 20.2.1 alignment.

  • Ray-Tracing Support For AMDGPU LLVM Back-End Lands For RDNA 2

    AMD previously confirmed it would be supporting real-time ray-tracing with their next-generation GPUs while now one month out from the Radeon RX 6000 series debut are the first signs of the open-source driver work around GPU ray-tracing.

    One day after spotting the patches for AV1 video decode with VCN 3.0, the latest open-source Radeon driver work to point out is the fundamentals around their ray-tracing introduction.

  • NVIDIA 455.23.04 Linux Beta Released With GeForce RTX 3080/3090 Support

    NVIDIA has once again managed to provide launch-day Linux driver support for their next-generation graphics processors. Today the NVIDIA 455.23.04 beta driver is shipping for Linux support with the GeForce RTX 3080 and RTX 3090 "Ampere" graphics cards.

  • RADV's "ACO" Shader Backend Still Pursuing RadeonSI, Early Work On RDNA 2

    Valve developer Timur Kristóf who has been spending the past year working on the AMD Compiler "ACO" back-end for the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" as well as beginning to port this shader compiler back-end to RadeonSI Gallium3D. This alternative to the AMDGPU LLVM back-end has made incredible progress over the past year -- enough so that it's been the default for Mesa's RADV driver. During XDC2020 Day 2, Timur provided an update on ACO.

  • Cache Creator Tool Proposed For AMDVLK Vulkan Driver

    Google engineer Steven Perron has laid out their proposal for an XGL cache creator tool for AMD's official Vulkan Linux driver, AMDVLK.

    As part of their work on relocatable shaders and supporting the offline compilation of Vulkan/SPIR-V shaders, they are working on "xgl_cache_creator" as a tool to take precompiled shaders and construct a file that can be redistributed and passed as the initial data into the Vulkan pipeline cache.

  • Arm Is Now Backing Panfrost Gallium3D As Open-Source Mali Graphics Driver

    Most information presented during the annual X.Org Developers' Conference doesn't tend to be very surprising or ushering in breaking news, but during today's XDC2020 it was subtly dropped that Arm Holdings appears to now be backing the open-source Panfrost Gallium3D driver.

  • Microsoft Has A Large Presence At This Year's X.Org Conference [Ed: Microsoft is now interjecting Windows and DirectX into conferences about Linux]

    Years ago if saying Microsoft would have multiple developers presenting at the annual X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC) as well as being a sponsor, you'd probably raise some laughs. But this year for XDC2020 Gdansk (albeit virtual due to COVID-19), Microsoft engineers gave not just one talk but three on the opening day.

    [...]

    Jesse Natalie and Steve Pronovost both of Microsoft kicked off XDC2020 by talking about the WSL graphics architecture in a pre-recorded, well-edited video presentation. That was followed by Pronovost talking about X11/Wayland application support under WSL and then the third and final Microsoft talk of the day was Jesse talking about their Mesa Direct3D 12 mapping layers for getting OpenCL/OpenGL over D3D12.

Graphics: XDC2020, Vulkan and NVIDIA GeForce NOW

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • X.Org Developers Conference 2020 Starts With Many Interesting Talks

    XDC2020 as the annual gathering of X.Org developers was due to take place in Poland this year but the COVID-19 pandemic has caused it to be yet another conference happening exclusively online. Day 1 of XDC2020 has just begun.

    XDC2020 is organized by Intel's graphics engineering team in Gdansk, Poland. The virtual event is leveraging existing Linux Plumbers Conference infrastructure as well as YouTube for video streaming. Intel is the platinum sponsor of XDC2020 while Google and NVIDIA are the gold sponsors.

  • After Reaching Vulkan 1.0 Conformance, V3DV Raspberry Pi Vulkan To Pursue Mainline Mesa

    The V3DV driver for providing Vulkan support on the Raspberry Pi 4 is very close to Vulkan 1.0 conformance and once squaring that away along with other lingering bits they will be pursuing the upstreaming of this driver within Mesa.

    Upstreaming the V3DV driver in Mesa will be a huge help for those wanting to see this Vulkan driver readily available on the many Linux distributions shipping Raspberry Pi spins and sticking to just upstream/mainline code. V3DV is very close to Vulkan 1.0 conformance with Quake III Vulkan, vkOpenArena, Vulkan-powered emulators, and various demos now running well on the Raspberry Pi 4 with this driver developed by Igalia under cooperation with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. Thus once upstream in 2021 we are looking at Linux distributions shipping this driver with their upstream Mesa.

  • XDC 2020 conference is today - Vulkan Ray Tracing and Vulkan for Raspberry Pi 4

    Today the X.Org Developers Conference (XDC 2020) begins and there's a couple of interesting talks worth checking out, especially if you like to follow OpenGL and Vulkan. What is the event? The X.Org Developers Conference is the event for developers working on all things open graphics related including in the Linux kernel, Mesa, DRM, Wayland, X11 and so on.

    Due to the ongoing COVID19 pandemic, it's going to be quite a streamlined virtual event spread across three days from September 16 to September 18. There's still going to be quite a few talks and lots of them sound really interesting.

  • NVIDIA GeForce NOW on Linux can run without user agent spoofing in a browser

    Looks like NVIDIA might be ready for the next push in cloud gaming with their GeForce NOW service, as it's even easier to run it on Linux. What is it? GeForce NOW allows you to play games you already digitally own on other platforms, on whatever device you have available. It hooks in with Steam, EA / Origin, Epic Games and more.

    Back in August, NVIDIA officially opened it up to Chromebooks by letting people playing with it in the browser. For everyone else, it needed you to spoof your user agent string to act like it was a Chromebook. It was a small thing but still a minor nuisance. That now, appears to no longer be needed.

Graphics Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Graphics Driver Patches Revived For Per-Client Engine Activity

    One of the interesting Intel Linux graphics driver patches to be sent out last year were for per-client engine reporting to allow on a per-application/process basis to see how the GPU's render/blitter/video engines were being utilized.

    That work for per-client "engine busyness" reporting went through a few rounds of review but as of Linux 5.9 there still isn't the support within Intel's i915 kernel driver.

  • Vulkan Present Timing Extension With Aim To Avoid Stuttering

    The Vulkan System Integration working group has decided to publish their work-in-progress extension on VK_EXT_present_timing as their effort to expose the presentation engine's display details and better allow scheduling a present to happen at a specific time.

    VK_EXT_present_timing is a big effort about helping to reduce stuttering and use-cases like better handling of variable refresh rate setups and other scenarios in wanting to ensure the presentation of a frame/image happens on schedule to avoid anomalies.

  • Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.4944 Brings Many Minor Optimizations

    The Intel Graphics Compiler (IGC) that is used by their Linux OpenCL/Level-Zero compute stack as well as now being used by their Windows graphics driver and potentially their Linux OpenGL/Vulkan drivers in the future is out with a new release.

    IGC releases tend to come frequent with a large team working on this open-source graphics compiler code while the 1.0.4944 milestone is a bit of a larger release.

  • X.Org Developer's Conference 2020

    After DebConf, Linux Plumbers and Akademy, the lineup of great virtual conferences continues this week with the 2020 edition of X.Org Developer's Conference (XDC), the leading event for developers working on all things Open graphics, including the Linux kernel, Mesa, DRM, Wayland and X11.

    Taking place entirely online for the first time, XDC 2020 brings a packed schedule of talks, workshops and lightning talks spread out over three days. Collaborans will giving two presentations & a lightning talk during the week, for which you can find full details below. The entire conference will be live-streamed on YouTube (Day 1, Day 2 & Day 3), however if you would like to take part in any of the discussions, there's still time to register (free of charge)!

  • AMD Radeon Navi 2 / VCN 3.0 Supports AV1 Video Decoding

    It turns out the Radeon RX 6000 series will have AV1 hardware video decode capabilities.

    In addition to Intel Xe / Tigerlake and the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 series supporting AV1 hardware decoding, it's now firmed up that the next-gen Navi 2 GPUs will also have AV1 decode.

    As previously reported, the AMD next-gen GPUs feature VCN 3.0 for Video Core Next. The previous VCN 3.0 Linux/open-source patches didn't reveal AV1 capabilities but new patches out today confirm AV1 support with VCN3.

Graphics: VGA Console Code, VGA Issues, and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Linux 5.9 Dropping Soft Scrollback Support From FB + VGA Console Code

    Linus Torvalds has decided to do away with the "soft scrollback" functionality found in the FBCON and VGACON kernel code as a sign of the times.

    VGACON/FBCON for the basic Linux console has supported a software scrollback buffer with the Shift + PageUp keyboard sequence for scrolling up in the output for contents out of view. But with most people not making heavy use of the frame-buffer console these days and the code being unmaintained, it's being stripped out from Linux 5.9.

  • Russell Coker: More About the PowerEdge T710

    I’ve got the T710 (mentioned in my previous post [1]) online. When testing the T710 at home I noticed that sometimes the VGA monitor I was using would start flickering when in some parts of the BIOS setup, it seemed that the horizonal sync wasn’t working properly. It didn’t seem to be a big deal at the time. When I deployed it the KVM display that I had planned to use with it mostly didn’t display anything. When the display was working the KVM keyboard wouldn’t work (and would prevent a regular USB keyboard from working if they were both connected at the same time). The VGA output of the T710 also wouldn’t work with my VGA->HDMI device so I couldn’t get it working with my portable monitor.

    Fortunately the Dell front panel has a display and tiny buttons that allow configuring the IDRAC IP address, so I was able to get IDRAC going. One thing Dell really should do is allow the down button to change 0 to 9 when entering numbers, that would make it easier to enter 8.8.8.8 for the DNS server. Another thing Dell should do is make the default gateway have a default value according to the IP address and netmask of the server.

  • AMD Shows First Glimpse Of Radeon RX 6000 Series Graphics Card

    Ahead of the RDNA 2 / Navi 2 reveal on October 28, AMD has shown off the first official render of a Radeon RX 6000 series graphics card.

    On Twitter AMD commented, "Take a first look at the design of the new Radeon RX 6000 series. Our upcoming @AMD #RDNA2 graphics cards will feature a brand new cooler design." They also noted there is a render of the Radeon RX 6000 series card within Fortnite for those wanting to explore there.

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