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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux 5.5 SSD RAID 0/1/5/6/10 Benchmarks Of Btrfs / EXT4 / F2FS / XFS

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Last month were benchmarks of RAID benchmarks on four hard drives in not visiting the Linux HDD RAID performance in a while. Stemming from that article were requests of fresh tests of the SSD RAID performance on Linux 5.5 Git, so here are those results for single drive performance and RAID0 / RAID1 / RAID5 / RAID6 / RAID10.

For this round of testing on a Dell PowerEdge server with dual EPYC 7601 processors were using four Samsung 860 EVO SATA 3.0 500GB drives for conducting these fresh solid-state drive RAID benchmarks. Off a Linux 5.5 Git kernel snapshot, EXT4, F2FS, Btrfs, and XFS were tested. The RAID modes were RAID0/RAID5/RAID6/RAID10 across the four drives plus results from a single drive as well.

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Mesa 20.0 Work by Intel and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel's Vulkan Driver Squeezes Another Optimization Into Mesa 20.0

    Patches written two months ago for Intel's ANV open-source Vulkan driver have now been merged ahead of the imminent Mesa 20.0 feature freeze and branching.

    The work worth mentioning is allowing HiZ in read-only depth layouts. "These layouts don't mean "sampled" they mean the same thing as DEPTH_STENCIL_OPTIMAL only the client promises to not write the depth or stencil buffer as indicated. Since HiZ depth testing is much faster than non-HiZ depth testing, we really don't want to disable HiZ for these."

  • RadeonSI Introduces A Live Shader Cache With Mesa 20.0

    In addition to the AMD RadeonSI Gallium3D driver's on-disk shader cache and in-memory shader cache there is now a "live shader cache" to help with deduplication of compiled shader objects.

    AMD's Marek Olšák landed this live shader cache on Friday. The introduction of this new caching level stems from the behavior of when games concert separate D3D shaders into linked GLSL shaders, the same vertex shader is often used with many different fragment shaders. In introducing this live shader cache of the compiled shader objects, for affected titles there should now be fewer resident shaders and fewer shader state changes.

Graphics: Digital Restrictions (DRM) in Weston/Wayland, DXVK, Valve, NVIDIA, Mesa and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Weston 8.0 Released With DRM HDCP Support, EGL Partial Updates, Headless OpenGL

    Highlights of Weston 8.0 include better DRM hardware planes support, HDCP content protection in conjunction with the DRM kernel driver back-end, headless OpenGL support, EGL_KHR_partial_update support for allowing partial screen updates for better efficiency with drivers supporting this EGL extension, the direct display extension, a memory optimization, and various other changes.

  • DXVK 1.5.2 Released With Many Game Fixes

    Coming a few weeks past DXVK 1.5.1 is now version 1.5.2 and it brings with it quite a number of improvements.

    First of all, DXVK 1.5.2 now targets the Vulkan 1.1 graphics API (not to be confused with Vulkan 1.2 that was just released). In requiring Vulkan 1.1, the graphics driver requirements are slightly elevated but still not bad at all as late 2017 Mesa drivers and newer are fine and the NVIDIA 390 series or newer. Nearly all Linux gamers should be set with their current drivers unless running quite an outdated distribution.

  • Valve's ACO Shader Compiler Back-End For Radeon Vulkan Is Now In Good Shape For GCN 1.0

    As last minute material for Mesa 20.0 is making Valve's "ACO" AMD compiler back-end for the RADV Vulkan driver in better shape for GFX6/GCN1.0 graphics hardware.

    Enabling RADV ACO, which was mainlined in Mesa 19.3, can shorten Vulkan shader compiler times and help with overall gaming performance. The results have been compelling and initially was focused on the very recent AMD Radeon graphics cards.

  • NVIDIA Contributes Much Less To The Linux Kernel Than Intel Or AMD

    Yesterday I put together some statistics on the AMD vs. Intel contributions to the upstream Linux kernel during the 2010s, but a request coming in off that was how do NVIDIA's contributions compare. Here is a look at the NVIDIA contributions to the Linux kernel over the past decade.

    Obviously NVIDIA's contributions are much less given they are primarily focused on a proprietary graphics driver stack compared to Intel and AMD with their Direct Rendering Manager drivers within the Linux kernel. But NVIDIA does contribute to the Linux kernel: they ultimately upstream their Tegra SoC support and other bits where it makes business sense. While they do not contribute much right now to open-source desktop graphics, they do contribute more to Nouveau where it concerns the Tegra graphics.

  • Nsight Graphics 2020.1 Released With Profiling For Vulkan+OpenGL Interop

    NVIDIA on Thursday introduced Nsight Graphics 2020.1 that to its profiling support can now handle OpenGL + Vulkan interoperability for games/applications making use of both APIs. While not many game engines / apps are yet using the likes of OpenGL 4.6 ARB_gl_spirv, Nsight is ready.

    Beyond profiling support for Vulkan+OpenGL interop, there are other profiling improvements, the Nsight Aftermath SDK is added for generating GPU mini-dumps with DirectX 12 software, and support for new Vulkan extensions. On the Vulkan side is now shader clock support, SPIR-V 1.4, and shader subgroup extended types.

  • Mesa 20.0 Now Defaults To The New Intel Gallium3D Driver For Faster OpenGL

    After missing their original target of transitioning to Intel Gallium3D by default for Mesa 19.3 as the preferred OpenGL Linux driver on Intel graphics hardware, this milestone has now been reached for Mesa 20.0!

    We've known that the revised Intel goal was Mesa 20.0 but that change-over was looking less likely especially with Mesa 20.0 entering feature freeze next week, but just in time the default change-over from i965 to Iris Gallium3D has happened.

  • Intel's OpenSWR Rasterizer Starts Seeing Tessellation Support

    OpenSWR is Intel's software rasterizer driver developed within Mesa as an alternative to Gallium3D's LLVMpipe and the slow Softpipe. OpenSWR is designed for delivering good CPU-based OpenGL graphics performance designed for visualization software running on workstations to HPC clusters. Like LLVMpipe, OpenSWR employs LLVM for some of its CPU optimizations.

  • AMD Ryzen 4000 Mobile Series "Renoir" Graphics No Longer Experimental With Linux 5.5

    While the Linux 5.5 kernel is expected to be released as soon as this Sunday, a last minute change to the AMDGPU DRM driver makes the Renoir graphics no longer treated as experimental. With that, there is open-source support out-of-the-box rather than being hidden behind a kernel module flag.

    AMD has been working on the Renoir support for Linux going back to the end of last summer. Renoir was sent in for the Linux 5.4 kernel but initially treated as "experimental" support while now at the end of the Linux 5.5 cycle it's no longer treated as experimental.

  • Disable Nvidia GPU on the Thinkpad T490

    I wrote about installing Linux on the Lenovo ThinkPad T490 last month and one of the biggest challenges was getting graphics working properly. The T490 comes with an option where you can get a discrete Nvidia MX250 GPU and it packs plenty of power in a small footprint.

Radeon RX 5600 XT With New vBIOS Offering Better Linux Performance Following Fix

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this week AMD launched the Radeon RX 5600 XT and as shown in our Linux launch-day review it offers nice performance up against the GTX 1660 and RTX 2060 graphics cards on Linux with various OpenGL and Vulkan games. Complicating the launch was the last-minute change to the video BIOS to offer better performance, but unfortunately that led to an issue with the Linux driver as well as confusing the public due to the change at launch and some board vendors already shipping the new vBIOS release while others are not yet. Fortunately, a Linux solution is forthcoming and in our tests it is working out and offering better performance.

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Kernel/Graphics: AMD, Intel and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD vs. Intel Contributions To The Linux Kernel Over The Past Decade

    Driven by curiosity sake, here is a look at how the total number of AMD and Intel developers contributed to the upstream Linux kernel during the 2010s as well as the total number of commits each year from the respective hardware vendors. 

    These numbers were obtained by looking at the Linux kernel commits in Git from AMD.com and Intel.com addresses. Granted, sometimes developers from both companies will use their personal email addresses rather than the corporate ones, but for this comparison is looking solely at the Git commits from the respective corporate domains.

  • Linux k10temp Driver For AMD CPUs Updated To Better Handle Power/Temp Analysis

    As we have been eagerly talking about for the past week, the Linux kernel's k10temp driver was updated for better AMD CPU CCD temperatures and voltage/current reporting. Those improvements have been quickly evolving thanks to the work of the open-source community with AMD still sadly holding the datasheets concerning the power/temperature registers close to their vest. A new version of k10temp was sent out on Wednesday. 

    As reported earlier this week, these k10temp improvements could land for the upcoming Linux 5.6 but additional testing is needed. While Zen 2 CPUs have been shipping for months, these k10temp improvements are only coming now thanks to HWMON maintainer Guenter Roeck who continues working on this driver in cooperation with the community as AMD currently isn't releasing documentation/datasheets concerning the power/thermal registers or any reference code for that matter... Many Linux desktop users dream of seeing something someday like AMD Ryzen Master coming to Linux. 

  • Gutting Out Intel MPX Support To Be Finished Up In The Linux 5.6 Kernel

    The Linux support for Intel MPX has already been pretty much dead since the GCC 9 compiler dropped support for MPX. Kernel developers following that began working to remove MPX from the kernel over not having the compiler support, MPX not being widely used, and also not much code movement on the kernel side. Memory Protection Extensions (MPX) was talked up years ago by Intel for allowing the checking of pointer references at run-time to avoid buffer overflows and other potential related vulnerabilities. But in reality it didn't become too popular with developers while AddressSanitizer and other compiler sanitizer infrastructure has become more used and without the need for special bits in the CPU. Intel themselves meanwhile have deprecated MPX and say the support won't be available on future CPUs, hence not being concerned much about the Linux support departing.

  • Mesa 20.0 branchpoint planned for 2020/01/29, Milestone opened
    Hi list, due to some last minute changes in plan I'll be managing the 20.0
    release. The release calendar has been updated, but the gitlab milestone wasn't
    opened. That has been corrected, and is here
    https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/-/milestones/9, please add any issues
    or MRs you would like to land before the branchpoint to the milestone.
    
    Thanks,
    Dylan
    
  • Mesa 20.0 Feature Development Is Ending Next Week

    Mesa developers are planning to end feature work on Mesa 20.0 next week as this first quarter update to the Mesa 3D graphics stack.

    There has been a heck of lot building up for Mesa 20.0 including many ACO optimizations, many RadeonSI and RADV improvements around GFX10/Navi, Intel Gallium3D improvements, OpenGL 4.6 with NIR by default for RadeonSI, NIR support for LLVMpipe, Vulkan 1.2 for Intel ANV and Radeon RADV, and a whole lot more... My usual feature overview will be out after the code has been branched.

Graphics: Dav1d AV1 Acceleration, AMDVLK and Sway 1.4

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Dav1d AV1 Decoder Begins Adding AVX-512 Optimizations For Intel Ice Lake

    Ahead of the forthcoming dav1d 0.6 release, this open-source AV1 video decoder has begun implementing AVX-512 optimizations targeting Intel Ice Lake processors.

    The work has begun on AVX-512 optimizations focused on Ice Lake for this already quite speedy AV1 video decoder.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q1.1 Brings Some Performance Tuning, Still On Vulkan 1.1

    Out this morning is AMDVLK 2020.Q1.1 as AMD's first official open-source Vulkan driver code drop of the new year.

    While the Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition driver for Windows was recently updated with Vulkan 1.2 support, this AMDVLK release is still on Vulkan 1.1 but at least updated against API 1.1.130 compliance. Hopefully their next code drop will have the Vulkan 1.2 support officially exposed. Meanwhile Mesa's RADV Radeon Vulkan driver has been supporting Vulkan 1.2 since hours after the specification's unveil.

  • Sway 1.4 Wayland Compositor Brings VNC Support, Initial Bits For MATE Panel Support

    Sway 1.4 is out today as the newest version of this i3-inspired Wayland compositor that has a growing following.

    Sway 1.4 consists of nearly 200 changes from over 50 contributors, showing the significant progress of this Wayland compositor that has been quick to pick-up features over the past few years.

Debian 7 Through Debian Testing Benchmarks With/Without Mitigations

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Graphics/Benchmarks

As part of our many Linux benchmarks in ending out the 2010s we ran tests looking at CentOS 6 through CentOS 8, seven years of Ubuntu Linux performance, and various other Linux distribution benchmarks and testing other important pieces of open-source software over time. One of the additional comparisons now wrapped up is looking at the performance of Debian GNU/Linux going back from the old 7 series through the current 10 stable series and also Debian Testing. Tests where relevant were done out-of-the-box with the default security mitigations and again with mitigations disabled.

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Graphics: Wayland 1.18 Alpha, Linux on Embedded Ryzen with Radeon, and Keith Packard's X Talk

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • wayland 1.17.91
    This is the alpha release for Wayland 1.18. Here's a highlight of the
    biggest changes:
    
    - Add support for the Meson build system (autotools is still supported
      but will be removed in a future release)
    - Add API to tag proxy objects to allow applications and toolkits to
      share the same Wayland connection
    - Track wayland-server timers in user-space to prevent creating too
      many FDs
    - Add wl_global_remove, a new function to mitigate race conditions with
      globals
    
    Thanks to all contributors!
    
    Full commit history below.
    
    Antonio Borneo (1):
          log: remove "%m" from format strings by using strerror(errno)
    
    Daniel Stone (2):
          build/doc: Ensure destination dir exists despite VPATH
          display-test: Remove unused variables
    
    Drew DeVault (3):
          Document unusual wl_registry.bind new_id behavior
          Add .editorconfig
          Improve description of wl_surface
    
    Emmanuel Gil Peyrot (2):
          cursor: Use memfd_create() when available
          wayland-shm: Don’t set SIGBUS handlers on unshrinkable fd
    
    Emmanuele Bassi (2):
          Support running tests from different build directories
          Add Meson build
    
    Harish Krupo (2):
          docs: Abort configure if docbook-xsl package is missing
          wayland.xml: document invalid_finish error in wl_data_offer.finish
    
    Jiayuan Ren (1):
          adding O_RDWR flag in the open()
    
    Jonas Ådahl (1):
          proxy: Add API to tag proxy objects
    
    Joshua Watt (2):
          scanner: Add configure check for strndup
          Move wl_priv_signal to wayland-server-private.h
    
    Leonid Bobrov (1):
          configure: detect libdl and librt
    
    Liu Wenlong (1):
          server: Fix fake "Address already in use" error
    
    Manuel Stoeckl (13):
          scanner: error when element names will not compile
          tests: Verify that wayland_scanner can catch bad identifiers
          protocol: clarify wl_display.delete_id description
          connection: do not abort when dup(fd) fails
          client: Ignore new requests if display has a fatal error
          client: Don't abort when sending a request fails
          tests: Test that send overflow doesn't abort
          tests: Fix race condition in send overflow test
          tests: Ensure that overflow test always overflows
          event-loop-test: Verify proper timer cancellation
          event-loop-test: Confirm distant timers do not fire
          event-loop: Track timer event sources in userspace
          event-loop-test: Add test to verify timer ordering
    
    Marty E. Plummer (1):
          scanner: prepend protocol name to types symbol
    
    Michael Forney (3):
          Use wl_container_of internally
          Avoid pointer arithmetic on `void *`
          protocol: fix typo in wl_data_offer.set_actions description
    
    Mosè Giordano (1):
          Add $(RT_LIBS) to fixed-benchmark LD dependencies
    
    Pekka Paalanen (2):
          configure.ac: reopen master for regular development
          scanner: include config.h from command line
    
    Scott Anderson (1):
          wayland.xml: Make releases for multiple 'wl_surface.attach' undefined
    
    Simon Ser (22):
          Add releasing.txt
          releasing: adapt for Wayland
          releasing: fixup section numbers
          protocol: allow to send a zero output refresh rate
          client: check event opcode in queue_event
          Update .editorconfig for Python
          Add an automated script to update wl_shm.format
          protocol: add a comment about the wl_shm.format script
          protocol: sync wl_shm.format with libdrm 2.4.99
          server: check global interface on bind
          tests: test that binding to a global with an interface mismatch fails
          protocol: invalid_method is sent on malformed request
          server: add wl_global_set_user_data
          server: add wl_global_remove
          tests: add a test for wl_global_remove
          build: check wayland-scanner version
          Revert "build: check wayland-scanner version"
          meson: use strict wayland-scanner mode
          autotools: use strict wayland-scanner mode
          build: check wayland-scanner version
          protocol: add missing enums for wl_data_device_manager.dnd_action
          build: bump to version 1.17.91 for the alpha release
    
    asynts (1):
          doc: Expand the abbreviation "hw" to "hardware".
    
    orbea (1):
          Add a missing -pthread to fix compile with slibtool.
    
    git tag: 1.17.91
    
  • Wayland 1.18 Alpha Released With Meson Support, Connection Sharing

    Wayland 1.18 is adding Meson build system support so that Autotools can be dropped in a future release, API support for allowing applications and toolkits to share the same Wayland connection, better handling over file descriptors, and wl_global_remove as a new function for mitigating race conditions with globals. There are also various test improvements, improved documentation, and various other fixes and minor improvements.

  • Linux on Embedded Ryzen with Radeon

    American Micro Devices (AMD) has released the Ryzen processors which works very well with Linux. The embedded processor also contains a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) which is an AMD Ryzen Vega.

    The board I am using is the IBase 918f-1605 to install Linux. Linux can be installed from a stock ISO, but the system does not perform as well unless using a special Linux kernel from AMD. It also helps to have the proper GPU driver for performance. Stability is much better with the AMD kernel they provide on their website.

  • Keith Packard Talks About The Early Politics Of X Window System + Code Licensing

    At last week's Linux.Conf.Au conference was an interesting presentation by longtime X developer Keith Packard on the early days of the pre-X.Org X Window System, the collapse of Unix, and how his views formed on copyleft licenses for building thriving communities.

    Keith's LCA 2020 presentation is focused on the X happenings largely during the 80's and very early 90's. Keith's involvement goes back to the 80's during which he was employed at MIT as part of the X Consortium.

  • Keith Packard: lca2020

    I just got back from linux.conf.au 2020 on Saturday and am still adjusting to being home again. I had the opportunity to give three presentations during the conference and wanted to provide links to the slides and videos.

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT Linux Gaming Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

As announced back at CES, the Radeon RX 5600 XT is being launched as the newest Navi graphics card to fill the void between the original RX 5700 series and the budget RX 5500 XT. The Radeon RX 5600 XT graphics cards are beginning to ship today at $279+ USD price point and offers great Linux support but with one last minute -- and hopefully very temporary -- caveat.

The Radeon RX 5600 XT features 36 compute units, 2304 stream processors, up to 7.19 TFLOPs, a 1375MHz game clock, 6GB of GDDR6 video memory, and a total board power of around 150 Watts. The Radeon RX 5600 XT like the rest of the RDNA/Navi line-up is a 7nm part, supports PCI Express 4.0, and other common RDNA features.

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XanMod-ing Ubuntu To Perform Closer To Intel's Clear Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this month many Phoronix readers were interested in our fresh tests of the XanMod-patched Linux kernel for boosting the desktop and workstation performance compared to Ubuntu's default Linux kernel. Among many patches, XanMod does pull in some kernel patches from Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux, so we figured it would be interesting to see how the XanMod'ed Ubuntu compares to Clear Linux performance.

As covered more in the earlier article, the XanMod Linux kernel flavor makes use of the BFQ I/O scheduler, offers CPU scaling governor improvements, makes use of preemptive full tickless kernel settings, and has a variety of other patches from leveraging Clear Linux optimizations to the BMQ process scheduler to the Proton FSYNC patches to much more. This round of testing was using a daily snapshot of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS with its current Linux 5.4 default kernel and then re-tested using the same Ubuntu 20.04 LTS installation but running on the 4.1.10-xanmod6 kernel at the time. Additionally, the same CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS as Clear Linux defaults to were also utilized.
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