Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux and Graphics: AMD, Linux 4.14 LTS, Etnaviv Gallium3D

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux 4.14 Ensures The "Core Performance Boost" Bit Gets Set For AMD Ryzen CPUs

    Recently making waves in our forums was talk of a kernel patch to address a case where the AMD CPB (Core Performance Boost) isn't being exposed by Ryzen processors. Here's more details on that and some benchmarks.

    Being talked about recently is f7f3dc0: "CPUID Fn8000_0007_EDX[CPB] is wrongly 0 on models up to B1. But they do support CPB (AMD's Core Performance Boosting cpufreq CPU feature), so fix that."

  • Linus Torvalds Is Confident That Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS Will Arrive on November 5

    Development of Linux 4.14, the next LTS (Long Term Support) kernel series, continues with the fifth RC (Release Candidate) milestone, which was announced by Linus Torvalds himself this past weekend.

    According to Linus Torvalds, things have finally starting to calm down for the development of the Linux 4.14 LTS kernel, and it looks like the RC5 snapshot is smaller than he would have expected, at least smaller than last week's RC4, which is a good thing, meaning that there won't be need for eight RCs during this cycle.

  • Etnaviv Gallium3D Is Almost To OpenGL 2.0 Compliance

    The Etnaviv Gallium3D driver that provides reverse-engineered, open-source graphics support for Vivante graphics hardware is almost to exposing OpenGL 2.0.

    Etnaviv contributor Christian Gmeiner today posted a set of patches for adding occlusion queries support to the driver. The code at just over one thousand lines of code is the last major feature needed for exposing desktop OpenGL 2.0 capabilities with this community-driven driver.

  • AMD Developers Begin Making Open-Source FreeSync/AdaptiveSync Plans

    While the AMDGPU DC code is expected to land for Linux 4.15 with goodies like Vega display support, HDMI/DP audio, and atomic mode-setting, one of the sought after display features won't be initially supported: FreeSync or the VESA-backed AdaptiveSync.

    As we've known for a while, while AMDGPU DC fills out the requirements for being able to support FreeSync, the last bits of the implementation are not present as the interfaces are basically yet to be decided among the open-source driver developers. While AMD can post their existing FreeSync code as found in AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver, they are trying to come up with a more standardized interface that will satisfy the other upstream Linux driver developers too that might want to support AdaptiveSync.

Graphics and Games: AMDGPU DC, Vulkan, GOG

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • More Pre-4.15 AMDGPU DC Patches To Test Out This Weekend

    For Radeon RX Vega Linux users or those with newer Radeon GPUs and just wanting to make use of HDMI/DP audio, there are some new "AMDGPU DC" patches ready for testing this weekend.

    While AMDGPU DC is being staged as a pull request finally for Linux 4.15, the work hasn't yet settled down as AMD developers continue taming this massive code-base of more than 120,000 lines of code. Just recently in fact were another 100+ patches for this display code that allows Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting, and other display feature updates long sought after by Radeon users.

  • Vulkan 1.0.63 Introduces Global Priority Support

    Vulkan 1.0.63 is now available as the latest minor update to this high performance graphics/compute API.

    As usual, Vulkan 1.0.63 is mostly made up of document corrections and clarifications. There is though one new extension.

  • Humble Bundle has been acquired by IGN

    This is rather unsettling to see, Humble Bundle has now officially joined with the massive media site IGN.

Mesa 17.3 Coming Soon, X.Org Server 1.19.5 is Out

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 17.3 Will Be Branching Soon For Releasing In Mid-November

    Feature development for Mesa 17.3 will be over soon in order to get this quarterly update to Mesa3D shipping next month.

    Release manager Emil Velikov is planning to issue the feature freeze and first release candidate next Friday, 20 October. That will mark the deadline for getting major features/improvements into Mesa 17.3, after which point it will be reserved for bug fixes.

  • xorg-server 1.19.5

    One regression fix since 1.19.4 (mea culpa), and fixes for CVEs 2017- 12176 through 2017-12187. C is a terrible language, please stop writing code in it.

  • X.Org Server 1.19.5 Released To Fix Another Handful Of Security Vulnerabilities

    Ouch, so basically a lot of potential for buffer overflows. Sadly, this is not the first time we have seen a big batch of X.Org Security vulnerabilities and security researchers in the past have generally characterized X.Org security as even worse than it looks.

7-Way Linux Distribution Comparison On The Intel Core i7 8700K

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Our latest benchmarking of Intel's 8th Gen Core "Coffee Lake" processors entailed seeing how well the i7-8700K performs on a variety of modern Linux distributions. Tested for this comparison was Ubuntu 17.10, Antergos 17.10, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Clear Linux, Debian Testing, Solus 3, and Fedora 26.

With these seven GNU/Linux distributions they were tested out-of-the-box following a clean install on the i7-8700K setup. Some highlights from these distributions include:

The Arch-based Antergos 17.10 rolling distribution has Linux 4.13.5, GNOME Shell, Mesa 17.2.2, GCC 7.2.0, and EXT4 by default.

Read more

Kernel and Graphics: LTS, NVIDIA, Mir 0.28, RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux LTS Kernel Support Extended to 6 Years

    Despite being a free and open source OS, Linux has one of the quickest development cycles. Every 70 days, a major new version of the Linux kernel rolls out. This deprecates any older versions except for the few Long Term Support releases. In a sign of changing times, the Linux kernel lifetime is getting a major boost. From now on, the Linux LTS kernel will be supported for a whole 6 years. Jumping up to 6 years is a tripling of the current 2 year support period. This is especially goods news for Android.

  • A Reverse-Engineered Tegra Video Decode Driver Steps Closer To Mainline
  • NVIDIA Releases Linux Graphics Debugger 2.2

    NVIDIA has today released an updated version of their Linux Graphics Debugger to help game/application developers in analyzing issues and performance problems around OpenGL 4.x on GeForce/Quadro GPUs.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Gets An On-Disk Shader Cache

    The RADV Radeon Vulkan driver in Mesa now supports an on-disk shader cache.

    Timothy Arceri working for Valve who previously spearheaded the RadeonSI OpenGL on-disk shader cache support has added a similar on-disk shader cache for the RADV Vulkan driver. Vulkan supports the concept of a pipeline cache for reusing cached objects between pipelines and runs of a game/application.

  • Another Minor Performance Optimization For RADV

    While Timothy Arceri working for Valve was busy wiring up an on-disk shader cache for RADV, Samuel Pitoiset working for this gaming giant has been tackling some additional optimizations.

  • Mir 0.28 Arrives As A Late Addition To Ubuntu 17.10

    Not that Mir is playing a pivotal role in Ubuntu 17.10 now that the transition has occurred to GNOME Shell and Wayland for this release, the new Mir release should make it into the archive. Mir 1.0 was expected up until yesterday when it was announced Mir 1.0 would be released as Mir 0.28.

  • The RADV Vulkan driver for AMD GPUs now has a shader cache in Mesa, plus more Mesa news

Linux Foundation, Kernel, and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • A ZSTD-Compressed Linux Kernel Could Be Up Next

    Nick Terrell of Facebook is proposing support for ZSTD-compressed kernel and ramdisk images. This would add to the list of other algorithms already available like Gzip, XZ, LZ4, and others for dealing with kernel images at boot time.

  • Chasing Grace: A New Documentary Series about Women in Tech

    After hearing several women in tech, smart women with bright futures, talk about leaving their jobs, Jennifer Cloer, Founder/Lead Consultant, reTHINKit PR, decided to launch the “Chasing Grace Project,” a six-episode documentary series about women in tech. The trailer debuted at the recent Linux Foundation Diversity Empowerment Summit in LA.

    “A young, very talented female programmer recently told me: ‘I don’t want to leave tech but after a year into my first job, I’m considering it,’” said Cloer. So she asked herself, “What can I do to help”

  • OVR_multiview Extension Completed For More Efficient OpenGL VR

    The OVR_multiview OpenGL Extension developed via the OpenVR initiative has been around for several months in an incomplete form for allowing more efficient virtual reality (VR) rendering while now the extension is complete.

  • More Than 100 More AMDGPU DC Patches Line Up Ahead Of Linux 4.15

    AMDGPU DC is expected for Linux 4.15 assuming Linus Torvalds has no objections to merging the code. We hope it won't, but the code-base for this new AMD display code is outright massive at more than 120,000 lines of code over hundreds of patches. Today another 103 new patches were published.

  • Initial Gallium3D VC5 Driver Merged Into Mesa

    The initial "VC5" Gallium3D driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics hardware has been merged into mainline Mesa.

  • Linux 4.15 Will Finally Graduate Intel "Coffee Lake" Graphics Out Of Alpha Support

    Another set of Intel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver updates were mailed in to DRM-Next today for the eventual Linux 4.15 kernel cycle.

NVIDIA 387.12 Vulkan vs. OpenGL Performance Across Multiple CPUs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Published earlier this week was the Intel Core i3, i5, i7 With NVIDIA vs. AMD Radeon For Linux Gaming results that are quite interesting while in this article is looking at the OpenGL vs. Vulkan Linux gaming performance using NVIDIA's first-rate binary driver while also doing this graphics API/renderer comparison across the Intel Coffeelake processors from low-end to high-end.

Read more

Graphics: Mesa, Mir, and Phoronix Test Suite

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa Is Up To About 8,000 Commits This Year, 2.2 Million Lines

    Now being into Q4, I've been meaning to run some fresh Mesa Git development statistics to see how this year is pacing for this important piece of the open-source graphics ecosystem and Linux desktop.

    As of this morning, Mesa's Git tree is made up of 5,633 files representing a total of 2,243,544 lines. This came about over 96,443 commits from more than 800 different authors. Mesa is still seeing on average about 13 commits per day.

  • Mir 1.0 Is Ready For Release

    There is just one week to go until the Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" release but it looks like the Mir 1.0 release will still happen in time.

    It's been the goal of the remaining Mir developers to release version 1.0 during the Artful cycle. As of a few weeks back they were still aiming for that goal and to pursue a feature freeze exception. As of yesterday, all blocker bugs have been cleared for releasing Mir 1.0.

  • MESA_tile_raster_order Added To The OpenGL Registry

    The new OpenGL extension MESA_tile_raster_order proposed by Eric Anholt at Broadcom has now been merged to the Khronos registry.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.6-Alvdal Milestone 1 Released

Graphics: Vega 10 On RadeonSI, Vulkan 1.0.62

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Testing Primitive Binning With Vega 10 On RadeonSI

    One month back Marek Olšák landed support in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver for primitive binning with Vega 10 GPUs but now that feature is likely to be disabled by default.

    Marek is moving ahead now to disable primitive binning by default for Vega 10 GPUs but to keep it enabled for upcoming Raven Ridge APUs. He explained in the proposed patch, "Our driver implementation is known to decrease performance for some tests, but we don't know if any apps and benchmarks (e.g. those tested by Phoronix) are affected. This disables the feature just to be safe."

  • Vulkan 1.0.62 Adds A New AMD Extension

    Vulkan 1.0.62 is now available as the latest updated specification for this high performance graphics and compute API.

    Vulkan 1.0.62 is mostly comprised of the usual documentation fixes and other clarifications. Nothing really too notable on that front with Vulkan 1.0.62.

Latest Open Access LWN: Fedora, Linux Kernel, and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Red Hat
  • Fedora's foundations meet proprietary drivers

    The Fedora project's four "foundations" are named "Freedom", "Friends", "Features", and "First". Among other things, they commit the project to being firmly within the free-software camp ("we believe that advancing software and content freedom is a central goal for the Fedora Project, and that we should accomplish that goal through the use of the software and content we promote") and to providing leading-edge software, including current kernels. Given that the kernel project, too, is focused on free software, it is interesting to see a call within the Fedora community to hold back on kernel updates in order to be able to support a proprietary driver.

    On September 5, Fedora kernel maintainer Laura Abbott announced that the just-released 4.13 kernel would be built for the (in-development) Fedora 27 release, and that it would eventually find its way into the Fedora 25 and 26 releases as well. That is all in line with how Fedora generally operates; new kernels are pushed out to all supported releases in relatively short order. Running current kernels by default is clearly a feature that many Fedora users find useful.

    More recently, though, James Hogarth noted that the NVIDIA proprietary driver did not work with the 4.13 kernel. This kind of breakage is not all that unusual. While the user-space ABI must be preserved, the kernel project defends its right to change internal interfaces at any time. Any problems that out-of-tree code experiences as a result of such changes is deemed to be part of the cost of staying out of the mainline. There is little sympathy for those who have to deal with such issues, and none at all if the out-of-tree code in question is proprietary. Community-oriented projects like Fedora usually take a similar attitude, refusing to slow down for the sake of proprietary code.

  • Notes from the LPC tracing microconference

    The "tracing and BPF" microconference was held on the final day of the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference; it covered a number of topics relevant to heavy users of kernel and user-space tracing. Read on for a summary of a number of those discussions on topics like BPF introspection, stack traces, kprobes, uprobes, and the Common Trace Format.

    Unfortunately, your editor had to leave the session before it reached its end, so this article does not reflect all of the topics discussed there. For those who are interested, this Etherpad instance contains notes taken by participants at the session.

  • An update on live kernel patching

    In the refereed track at the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), Jiri Kosina gave an update on the status and plans for the live kernel patching feature. It is a feature that has a long history—pre-dating Linux itself—and has had a multi-year path into the kernel. Kosina reviewed that history, while also looking at some of the limitations and missing features for live patching.

    The first question that gets asked about patching a running kernel is "why?", he said. That question gets asked in the comments on LWN articles and elsewhere. The main driver of the feature is the high cost of downtime in data centers. That leads data center operators to plan outages many months in advance to reduce the cost; but in the case of a zero-day vulnerability, that time is not available. Live kernel patching is targeted at making small security fixes as a stopgap measure until the kernel can be updated during a less-hurried, planned outage. It is not meant for replacing the kernel bit by bit over time, but as an emergency measure when the kernel is vulnerable.

  • Safety-critical realtime with Linux

    Doing realtime processing with a general-purpose operating-system like Linux can be a challenge by itself, but safety-critical realtime processing ups the ante considerably. During a session at Open Source Summit North America, Wolfgang Mauerer discussed the difficulties involved in this kind of work and what Linux has to offer.

    Realtime processing, as many have said, is not synonymous with "real fast". It is, instead, focused on deterministic response time and repeatable results. Getting there involves quantifying the worst-case scenario and being prepared to handle it — a 99% success rate is not good enough. The emphasis on worst-case performance is at the core of the difference with performance-oriented processing, which uses caches, lookahead algorithms, pipelines, and more to optimize the average case.

  • A memory allocation API for graphics devices

    At last year's X.Org Developers Conference (XDC), James Jones began the process of coming up with an API for allocating memory so that it is accessible to multiple different graphics devices in a system (e.g. GPUs, hardware compositors, video decoders, display hardware, cameras, etc.). At XDC 2017 in Mountain View, CA, he was back to update attendees on the progress that has been made. He has a prototype in progress, but there is plenty more to do, including working out some of the problems he has encountered along the way.

    Jones has been at NVIDIA for 13 years and has been working on this problem in various forms for most of that time, he said. Allocating buffers and passing them around between multiple drivers is a complicated problem. The allocator will sit in the same place as the Generic Buffer Management (GBM) component is today; it will be used both by applications and by various user-space driver components. The allocator will support both vendor-agnostic (e.g. Android ION) and vendor-specific back-ends, as well as combinations of the two.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Servers: Docker, Red Hat and InfluxData

Laptops: Chrome OS and System76

  • Chrome OS Gets Material Design for "Do Not Disturb," Android-Like Screenshots
    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort is sharing today information on a new Material Design refresh for Google's Chrome OS' "Do Not Disturb" mode, which landed in the latest Chrome Canary channel. According to the developer, the Material Design refresh for the "Do Not Disturb" mode will make the Notification Center look nicer, but also consistent with the Android user experience. Those using the Chrome Canary experimental channel can give it a try right now.
  • System76 'Lemur' and 'Galago Pro' Ubuntu Linux laptops get 8th gen Intel Core CPUs
    The famed Linux-laptop seller also says, "The Lemur you know and love is now even better with the Intel 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPU with 4 cores and 8 threads, allowing you to multitask up to 40-percent faster. The slim, 3.6 lb laptop with impressive 14.1-inch 1080p IPS display is still your perfect travel companion; easy to carry from meeting to meeting or across campus." New processors aside, these laptops should be pretty much identical to prior generations -- which is a very good thing. If you want to configure a Lemur with a Coffee Lake chip, you can build your own here. A Galago Pro with an 8th Gen Intel Core processor can be configured here.

Events: Open Source Summit Europe, LibrePlanet 2018

Licences: Eclipse Public Licence 2.0, GPL Copyright Troll, Fiduciary License Agreement 2.0

  • Eclipse Public License version 2.0 added to license list
    We recently updated our list of various licenses and comments about them to include the Eclipse Public License version 2.0 (EPL). In terms of GPL compatibility, the Eclipse Public License version 2.0 is essentially equivalent to version 1.0. The only change is that it explicitly offers the option of designating the GNU GPL version 2 or later as a "secondary license" for a certain piece of code.
  • Linux kernel community tries to castrate GPL copyright troll
    Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman and several other senior Linux figures have published a “Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement” to be included in future Linux documentation, in order to ensure contributions to the kernel don't fall foul of copyright claims that have already seen a single developer win "at least a few million Euros.” In a post released on Monday, October 16th, Kroah-Hartman explained the Statement's needed because not everyone who contributes to the kernel understands the obligations the GNU Public Licence 2.0 (GPL 2.0), and the licence has “ambiguities … that no one in our community has ever considered part of compliance.”
  • Fiduciary License Agreement 2.0
    After many years of working on it, it is with immense pleasure to see the FLA-2.0 – the full rewrite of the Fiduciary License Agreement – officially launch.