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today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Differences between European and US adoption of open source

  • Ubuntu Releases Alpha Version of Server 8.04
  • Embracing PCLinuxOS and Open Source
  • Linux defector says RHEL zero, Sun Solaris hero
  • Liferea: an RSS reader for GNOME
  • Tour of the Ubuntu Applications (2007)
  • Review: Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon takes on Mac OS X Leopard for the OS of the Year Part 1
  • Tech charities to consider this giving season
  • Video: Alan Cox and the state of free software
  • Klik2 RC to be around in February 2008
  • Suing Over Open Source
  • AGEIA Responds, Talks PhysX On Linux

Today's Leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Forrester: Open source apps lag behind Linux in the enterprise

  • Liberation fonts: still "non-distributable" for Debian!
  • Firefox 3 Linux Preview
  • What’re you listening to?
  • Jeff Jaffe: OpenSUSE
  • Penguins demand Linux for Antarctic datacenter
  • Open source telephony gives customers control, consultant says

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • People of openSUSE: James Ogley

  • An interview with Mike
  • Microsoft Fights VMware As it Flirts With Linux
  • Kubuntu gears up for KDE 4
  • Fedora Project Leader successor planning
  • Text-to-Speech and Other KWord Tips
  • Rise or fall for Red Hat?
  • Is the Linux/Windows interoperability deal paying off for Novell?
  • What Kind of Geek Are You?
  • Eschalon: Book I Demo for Linux
  • Still No UT3 For Linux...
  • KDE 4 uses less memory

Managing with Net-SNMP and IPython in UNIX and Linux systems

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News

The Net-SNMP library now has Python bindings, and it is an excellent choice to write custom code to manage a data center or supplement full-blown Network Management Systems. In this article, learn how to use Net-SNMP, Python, and the IPython shell to interactively explore and manage a network.

early leftovers

Filed under
News
  • new opensuse installer?

  • answer to my problem: PCLinuxOS Gnome
  • Penguins in space: NASA picks open source for lunar mission
  • 'Census' planned to help firms track open-source software
  • Netherlands Adopts Open-Source Software
  • what’s to come of the Wal-Mart PC
  • Ubuntu switch: If you ever want to sleep at night...
  • Edulos - Education the PCLinuxOS way

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Review: Asus Eee PC (video)

  • Is Microsoft really scared of Linux
  • Mozilla to addon developers: work on Firefox 3 compatibility
  • gddrescue: a tool for recovering data from damaged media
  • Quick Tip: Configuring Fixed Window Placement in Compiz Fusion
  • Tip from an RHCE: Memory storage on PostgreSQL
  • Quicksilver for Ubuntu
  • Wormux
  • Fedora Core 6 No More
  • Why Sourceforge lost its mojo
  • Are We There Yet? Making the Change to Open Source
  • When "freedom" rhymes with "insanity"

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Results From openSUSE Contributor Survey

  • Open source to help defend human rights
  • Bringing one SimCity per child to the OLPC
  • China's Linux desktop market booms
  • The Future of Linux: An Interview with Kim Brebach
  • High-Def On Linux: Hurry Up And Wait
  • Moving From Mac to Ubuntu
  • Open source in the US Department of Defense: the Opticks story
  • Ministry of Justice, Open Source discussion paper
  • First Look GoblinX Micro 2.6

Today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Remove Mono dependancy from Ubuntu

  • Red Hat's Open Source IDE
  • “I’d suggest Linux - but..” - I’d suggest you get a clue, but..
  • Hands on with Android: XML Parsing
  • Hospital software vendor McKesson uses Linux to heal IT budgets
  • ALSA's snd-oxygen For C-Media CMI8788 APUs
  • Daniel Robbins: And even more new Gentoo stages...
  • Process wakeups on GNOME 2.18
  • Seven Predictions for 2008

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • New learnings from bug reports and conservative people

  • Basic Linux Commands
  • How Do I Add Temporary Swap Space?
  • Fontmatrix is pretty cool, VolWheel rocks!
  • Stella, Compiz-Fusion, and Pulse Audio
  • Ubuntu Server: Kernel Configuration Considerations
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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora News

4MLinux 26.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 26.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including major changes in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.27 and the GNU Compiler Collection 7.3.0. Read more