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  • Intel Continues Prepping ACPI Error Disconnect Recover Support For The Linux Kernel

    Since this summer Intel open-source engineers have been working on adding ACPI Error Disconnect Recover (EDR) support to the Linux kernel and this week marks the eleventh revision to the kernel support for this new ACPI feature.

  • Host Akademy 2020 in your City!

    Hosting an event is a big and significant way of contributing to Free Software. One of the biggest challenges in international distributed teams like KDE is communicating effectively with one another. Akademy, the yearly global conference of the KDE community, solves that by bringing the community together in one place, allowing us to share what we have been up to and have it reach its potential.

    By organising Akademy we are then turning one of our weak points into a strength. We get to work together like a local team does, while remaining flexible and geographically distributed for most of the rest of the year. It becomes therefore one of the best ways for Free Software to thrive in your area.

    [...]

    You can find the full description of what's necessary in this simple-to -follow brochure. Reach out to the KDE e.V. Board and the Akademy team and put your thoughts in action.

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/52

    The year 2019 is coming to an end and this is the final week of the year. As you are surely aware, in many regions people tend to stay away from computers during this period of the year and it is thus not surprising, that Tumbleweed has been rolling a bit slower. But actually: has it? During the last week, 2 snapshots (1221 and 1225) have been published to the users. But there were also snapshots tested and discarded (e.g. 1223 and 1224). Just because we have a snapshot does not mean we distribute it (in this case the issues were around libmozjs60 switching to be an i686 base library, but polkit being an i586 application linking this library). But anyway: let’s talk about the success of this week and what updates those two published snapshots brought the users in the end:

    KDE Frameworks 5.65.0
    QEmu 4.2.0
    PHP 7.4.1
    zsh 5.8 (pre2)

  • Nebulous Networking | TechSNAP 419

    From classifying cats to colorizing old photos we share our top tips and tools for starting your machine learning journey. Plus, learn why Nebula is our favorite new VPN technology, and how it can help simplify and secure your network.

  • Noncommercial Doesn't Compose (and it never will)

    It's sad to see history repeat itself, but that's what history does, and it seems like we're in an awfully echo'y period of time. Given the volume of submissions in favor of some sort of noncommercial style license, I feel I must weigh in on the issue in general. Most of my thoughts on this developed when I worked at Creative Commons (which famously includes a "noncommercial" clause that can be mixed into a few licenses), and it took me a while to sort out why there was so much conflict and unhappiness over that clause. What was clear was that Non-Commercial and No-Derivatives were both not considered "free culture" licenses, and I was told this was drawn from the lessons of the free software world, but here we are hashing it out again so anyway...

    (I'm not suggesting this is a CC position; Creative Commons hasn't to my knowledge taken an official stance on whether NonCommercial is right, and not everyone internally agreed, and also I don't work there anymore anyhow.)

    I thank Rob Myers for a lot of clarity here, who used to joke that NC (the shorthand name for Non-Commercial) really stood for "No Community". I think that's true, but I'll argue that even more so it stands for "No Composition", which is just as much or more of a threat, as I hope to explain below.

    As a side note, I am of course highly empathetic to the motivations of trying to insert a noncommercial clause; I've worn many hats, and funding the software I've worked on has by far been the hardest. At first glance, an NC approach appears to be a way to solve the problem. Unfortunately, it doesn't work.

  • How to Download & Install Linux (Ubuntu) in Windows – kanilive
  • Ryuk ransomware spares Windows Linux installs

    A new variant of the Ryuk ransomware now blacklists Linux folders used on Windows 10, so as to avoid encrypting them.

    The change avoids affecting the folders for the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL), which allows Linux to be installed as a virtual machine on Windows 10.

  • How to Rotate Display in Ubuntu, Linux
  • How to Setup a Cron Job in Debian 10
  • The 20 Best Linux Web Hosting for Personal Sites and Enterprises

    Web hostings are crucial to developers, companies, and personal website owners. Although creating a web server is easy for Linux gurus, it’s quite the opposite for general consumers. Since not everybody can build and deploy web apps intuitively, many hosting providers offer ready-made servers with necessary environment configurations. Linux web hostings are simply hosting services that utilize Linux distros for providing customers with a working server. Due to its superior features and unmatched flexibility, Linux is the number one choice for renowned companies. Today we take a look at some of the best Linux hosting you can use for your next website.

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Python Programming

  • Split String in Python

    When a string of multiple words is divided into the specific number of words based on a particular separator then it is called string splitting. Most of the programming languages use the split() method to divide a string into multiple words. The return type of this method is an array for many standard programming languages. the split() method is used in Python also to divide a string into words and it returns a list of words based on the separator. How to split() method can be used in Python is shown in this article by using different examples. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and execute the python script.

  • Send and receive UDP packets via Python

    We already know about two main transport layer protocols like TCP and UDP. For more information about TCP and UDP you can check reference section. In this article we will learn how to send and receive UDP packets using python program.

  • The 7 most popular ways to plot data in Python

    "How do I make plots in Python?" used to have a simple answer: Matplotlib was the only way. Nowadays, Python is the language of data science, and there's a lot more choice. What should you use? This guide will help you decide. It will show you how to use each of the four most popular Python plotting libraries—Matplotlib, Seaborn, Plotly, and Bokeh—plus a couple of great up-and-comers to consider: Altair, with its expressive API, and Pygal, with its beautiful SVG output. I'll also look at the very convenient plotting API provided by pandas. For each library, I've included source code snippets, as well as a full web-based example using Anvil, our platform for building web apps with nothing but Python. Let's take a look.

  • Episode 3: Effective Python and Python at Google Scale

    In this episode, Christopher interviews Brett Slatkin about the 2nd edition of his book Effective Python. Brett talks about the revisions he made for the book, and updating it for the newest versions of Python 3. Christopher asks who is the intended developer for the book. Brett also discusses working on Google App Engine, and what it’s like to develop and maintain Python applications at Google Scale. Brett mentions a brief anecdote about working with Guido van Rossum, while they both worked at Google. He also provides advice about maintaining a large and aging Python code base.

  • Randy Zwitch: Building pyarrow with CUDA support

    The other day I was looking to read an Arrow buffer on GPU using Python, but as far as I could tell, none of the provided pyarrow packages on conda or pip are built with CUDA support. Like many of the packages in the compiled-C-wrapped-by-Python ecosystem, Apache Arrow is thoroughly documented, but the number of permutations of how you could choose to build pyarrow with CUDA support quickly becomes overwhelming. In this post, I’ll show how to build pyarrow with CUDA support on Ubuntu using Docker and virtualenv. These directions are approximately the same as the official Apache Arrow docs, just that I explain them step-by-step and show only the single build toolchain I used.

  • Python String Formatting

    The string Formatting is a very important task of any type of programming language. It helps the user to understand the output of the script properly. The string formatting can be done in Python in various ways, such as using ‘%’ symbol, format() method, string interpolation, etc. This article shows how the string data can be formatted in Python by using different string formatting methods. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and run the script. Two types of formatting parameters can be used in Python. These are positional parameters and keyword parameters. The parameter which is accessed by the index is called the positional parameter and the parameter which is accessed by key is called the keyword parameter. The uses of these parameters are shown in the next part of this article.

  • 30 Days Of Python | Day 3 Project: A Simple Earnings Calculator

    Welcome to the first mini project in the 30 Days of Python series. For this project we're going to be creating a simple console application that will help an employer calculate an employee's earning in a given week. [...] Once you've written your program, you shouldn't be worried if it looks a little bit different to ours. You might have chosen different variable names or prompts, or you might have used a slightly different approach to us. This is absolutely fine. There are often may different ways to write even very short programs like this.

  • When to use the Clean Architecture?

    There are few possible reactions after learning about the Clean Architecture or Hexagonal Architecture (AKA Ports & Adapters) or even merely innocent service layer in Django. Some developers are enthusiastic and try to apply these techniques immediately, some are hesitant, full of doubts. The rest is strongly opposing, declaring openly this is an abomination. Then they say we already have excellent tools, like Django. Then they argue others don’t know about the advanced features of common tools. Then they call you Java developer in disguise. As a speaker and an author of the book Implementing the Clean Architecture , I have faced all the reactions from this spectrum. What two extremes fail to do, is to ask the right question – WHEN? When the Clean Architecture should be used?

Android Leftovers

New Manjaro Linux ARM 20.04 Released For Single Board Computers

With the successful shipment of Manjaro Linux ARM to Pinebook Pro, the Manjaro ARM team has released a new ARM v20.4 for single board computers. The latest version is a successor to the previous ARM 20.02 with major system changes. Manjaro ARM is an Arch and Manjaro Linux-based small distribution by a developer team from Manjaro Linux. The ARM edition is a dedicated operating system for devices using ARM architecture-based processors. Read more

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