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Linux Journal's Return, OpenSource.com Roundup, and LWN's 2017 Retrospective

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  • Linux Journal returns, Automotive Grade Linux at CES, and more open source news

    In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we cover the rebirth of Linux Journal, Automotive Grade Linux infotainment systems, and more.

  • A 2017 retrospective

    The December 21 LWN Weekly Edition will be the final one for 2017; as usual, we will take the last week of the year off and return on January 4. It's that time of year where one is moved to look back over the last twelve months and ruminate on what happened; at LWN, we also get the opportunity to mock the predictions we made back in January. Read on for the scorecard and a year-end note from LWN.
    Your editor led off with a prediction that group maintainer models would be adopted by more projects over the course of the year; this prediction was partly motivated by the Debian discussion on the idea of eliminating single maintainers. Debian appears to have dropped the idea; Fedora, meanwhile, has seen some strong pushback from maintainers who resent others touching "their" packages. Group maintainership may have made a few gains here and there, but it has not yet succeeded in taking over the free-software world.

    The prediction that the vendor kernels shipped on Android devices would move closer to the mainline was not a complete failure. Google has made some efforts to push vendors toward less-ancient kernels, and efforts to get those vendors to work more closely with the mainline are beginning to bear fruit. It will be a long and slow process, though.

What Every Linux Users Must Know About Meltdown and Spectre Bugs

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Meltdown and Spectre are two vulnerabilities that impact almost all computers, tablets and smartphones on the earth. Does it mean you can be hacked? What can you, a Linux user, do about it?
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Tizen Experts Ends (No More Articles in 2018), Another End-of-2017 Report, HTTPS Year in Review

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  • IoT Gadgets, the new home for Tizen Experts

    Where has the time gone? Once upon a time (seems appropriate) I was fascinated with an Operating System (OS), that powered the Nokia N900, which was called Maemo. The N900 was a Linux based smartphone that the iPhone could not compete with on many technical points. This device could actually run flash in its native browser and it could run it well. This is when I started my first website MaemoExperts.

  • GIMP 2.9.8 and end-of-2017 report

    Here it is, GIMP 2.9.8 has been released some days ago now, the latest development version of GIMP! As it is customary now, let’s list our involvement in this version so that our supporters on crowdfunding platforms know what they funded.

  • Tipping the Scales on HTTPS: 2017 in Review

    The movement to encrypt the web reached milestone after milestone in 2017. The web is in the middle of a massive change from non-secure HTTP to the more secure, encrypted HTTPS protocol. All web servers use one of these two protocols to get web pages from the server to your browser. HTTP has serious problems that make it vulnerable to eavesdropping and content hijacking. By adding Transport Layer Security (or TLS, a prior version of which was known as Secure Sockets Layer or SSL) HTTPS fixes most of these problems. That’s why EFF, and many like-minded supporters, have been pushing for web sites to adopt HTTPS by default.

    In February, the scales tipped. For the first time, approximately half of Internet traffic was protected by HTTPS. Now, as 2017 comes to a close, an average of 66% of page loads on Firefox and are encrypted, and Chrome shows even higher numbers.

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SUSE: GNU Health Project, Uyuni, OpenSUSE Leap 15

  • openSUSE Donates 10 More Raspberry Pis to GNU Health
    The openSUSE Project once again donated 10 Raspberry Pis to GNU Health Project, which were handed over to the project’s founder Luis Falcon at the openSUSE Conference today. Last year, the openSUSE Project donated 10 Raspberry Pis to the non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO) that delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.
  • Uyuni: Forking Spacewalk with Salt and Containers
    Members of a new open source community project called Uyuni announced today at openSUSE Conference that a fork of the open-source systems management solution Spacewalk is on its way.
  • OpenSUSE Leap 15 released (Linux with enterprise features)
    The latest version of OpenSUSE is out today, bringing a new installer, improvements for cloud usage, and support for the GNOME and KDE desktop environments. OpenSUSE Leap 15 is also more closely aligned with SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE), making it easy for users to migrate from the community-based operating system to the professional version that offers better stability and long-term support, among other things.

Android Leftovers

openSUSE Leap 15 Released! See what's New

The latest openSUSE release Leap 15 is here with updated software, Wayland support and an easier upgrade procedure to the famed SUSE Linux Enterprise Edition. Read more

Android Leftovers