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today's leftovers:

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News
  • Can We Trust Microsoft?
  • rekonq, 1 feature a week. #2
  • Chrome OS, like Tux, will never fly
  • Mandriva taking requests for new build system
  • Kernel Log: Further problems with UEFI
  • Sabayon to abandon GNOME 2
  • 10 things to think about to improve software product descriptions
  • S2TC: A Possible Workaround For The S3TC Patent Situation
  • The strategy behind Mono has shifted
  • Intel, Collabora and SUSE to be main sponsors of the Desktop Summit
  • 4 Key Principles for Open source Projects
  • OnLive Is Hiring More Engineers For Linux Client
  • Free hypervisor adds virtual machine cloning
  • Upstream Virtualbox + openssl versions on mandriva
  • Interview: Kuno Woudt, MusicBrainz
  • Mark’s Quick Gimp Tip
  • Red Hat Confirms Plans for North America Partner Conference
  • NVIDIA Proposes Extending RandR
  • HP TouchPad 32GB WebOS tablet

odds & ends:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Moving the screenlocker into compiz
  • systemd for Administrators, Part IX
  • Why Corporations Favors The Apache License Over The GPL/LGPL
  • Live USB Drive | LAS | s17e08
  • A Closet Misanthrope’s View of Online Social Networking
  • highlight a target in a photo with a simulated spotlight in GIMP
  • Steampunk beautiful theme for KDM and ksplash (openSUSE)
  • Hacking together my digital artifacts with a wifi picture frame
  • Using getmail to backup Gmail on Linux

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • FLARE 0.14, 0.14.1 and a new video
  • KDE Community Keynote Interview: Stuart Jarvis
  • Mad, Mad Intervew
  • The touch command does more than just create empty files
  • Logitech Webcam On Ubuntu
  • SuperTuxKart 7.2 Final Has Been Released
  • install PCLinuxOS 2011.6 on an encrypted LVM
  • Install Elementary Music App BeatBox in Ubuntu 11.04 from PPA
  • make your own 20th Century Fox / LIONSGATE intro with Blender in 5 min
  • Creating Startup Scripts with Bash

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Specto - follow events in your desktop
  • Maximized windows in Compiz
  • OpenOffice.org in Apache: The Next Step
  • How I learned to love Free Software
  • Kororaa 15 (Squirt) Beta released
  • Gentoaster – Week 7 progress report
  • NVIDIA 275.19 Linux Driver Published
  • Patent trolls chase app developers out of the U.S.
  • Ubuntu Surfboard
  • "Comics With Krita" Training DVD
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 10th July

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Passing on the Linux dream
  • Install 'Stunt Rally' Game in Ubuntu from PPA
  • Simple screen/window grabbing
  • Maximum Calculus with Maxima
  • Interview: Thomas Thwaite, designer and technologist
  • LinuxFormat Praises MEPIS and Anti-MEPIS
  • As Facebook Shows Its Fear, Open-Xchange Bounces Back
  • 28 Beautiful Wallpapers seen on WebUpd8
  • Windows 7 vs. Linux With Sandy Bridge New Acceleration Architecture
  • Linux Mint 11 LXDE RC2 released!
  • Spotify launches unlimited free US service
  • Olive Healthcare Slashes IT Costs by Migrating to Linux OS
  • SPDX Readies a New Specification for License and Copyright Reporting
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 411

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Unity breaks Bluefish
  • DesktopNova - changes the wallpaper automatically
  • Do Python Coding with NINJA-IDE
  • Where Did All the Idealism Go?
  • Spotify: Tomorrow's the day for U.S. launch
  • Unity Report for 13 July
  • News from GNOME Shell land
  • Five Beautiful Plank Themes
  • Telecom Service Provider Handles Huge Volumes of Data Using FOSS
  • VC funding for OSS-related vendors in Q2
  • Sourceforge Project of the Month July 2011: Moodle
  • Status Update: Plasma MediaCenter
  • FLOSS Weekly 174: Enano CMS
  • UCOSP: A model for getting undergraduates involved in Open Source
  • Samba may consider accepting corporate-donated code ... fixes only?
  • Canary Islands - OSS to forecast and manage forest fires
  • Neat Timelapse Video Made in Ubuntu Using Open-Source Apps

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Knoppix 6.4: can you spot the difference?
  • I finally found you Xfce and I am not going to let you go!
  • BackupRotator - Utility to rotate backup and log files
  • Lots of Support for One Percent!
  • Red Hat Breaks Through at $44.87
  • Zippl again – now in the package
  • Shuttleworth: Fantastic engineering management is…
  • Time And Materials? – NOT!
  • Slow?
  • Game Editor to create your game, on Linux
  • Tax-on-web with Debian and Firefox
  • 63 Open Source Replacements for Popular Financial Software
  • The idea behind Contour
  • Android Is The Linux Dream Come True?
  • Gwibber Gets Revamped For Ubuntu 11.10
  • The importance of trademarks, even for an open source business
  • Firefox 8 (Yes, 8) Is Getting A Massive Speed Boost
  • BootMed Teaches You How to Save Ailing PCs
  • Project Euler
  • static single assignment for functional programmers

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • rekonq, 1 feature a week. #1
  • snappy 0.2 is out
  • The Microsoft bully is back
  • FOSS vs Proprietary – Who cares about ‘The War’
  • Three great little Squirrelmail plugins and how to install them
  • Canonical Copyright Assignments
  • Mandriva, at the heart of the CompatibleOne project
  • The responsibility in open source
  • Podcast: Igor Pires Soares – Fedora Project
  • Fedora 15 Configuration Series: A Review Of Ailurus
  • Well balanced Red Hat sits easily in the region
  • IBM heaves new System z minis at mainframe shops
  • XpGnome
  • XBRL Group Offers Cash Prize for Open-source Tools
  • XreaL Is Still Around, But Without Any Release
  • Presentation resolution on netbooks
  • Ubuntu QA Community Coordinator Required
  • Ten Content Management Systems for Photo Galleries

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Opera Joins Chrome and Firefox On The Rapid Release Bandwagon
  • Growing Pains
  • Debian Community Distribution Patent Policy FAQ now available
  • Amadeus: The GCompris Piano
  • Search and Rescue II v2.3.1
  • Linux Mint 10 screen capture tour
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 3rd July 2011
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 162: Rubber Stamped!
  • Full Circle Side-Pod Episode Nine: Mish-mash
  • AROS Broadway | LAS | s17e07
  • Linux Outlaws 217 - German Hip Hop Gangs

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Tidy up xml file from the command line
  • there is no single right answer for buffering, ever… (part 2)
  • Alter Your Environment with Functions
  • 3 Tips To Make A Firefox Active Tab Stand Out
  • Fitting yourself a sit-to-stand desk
  • Linux Mint signs a partnership with AYKsolutions
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Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

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Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more