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News

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • KDE 4.11.3 Officially Released with Over 120 Bug Fixes
  • Open source engine Docker teams up with the Fedora Project
  • Floral innuendo: ‘Luxuria Superbia’ turns plants and sex into a game
  • Compact box-PCs take Linux to extremes
  • Official: Red Hat's healthcare.gov fix is working (Red Hat picked to fix HealthCare.gov)

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KDE and Canonical Conflict over Mir Finally Bursts into the Open
  • Major KDE Developer Says Goodbye to Ubuntu
  • KDE Developers Continue To Be Frustrated With Canonical
  • Linux OS on the rise: Steam Hardware Survey
  • Outreach Program for Women Seeks New Linux Kernel Interns
  • Upgrading on a budget: Running Linux on a refurbished laptop and docking station
  • Ode to Project Ara
  • Red Hat Fedora 20 Linux: New Networking, ARM Features
  • Make sense of a lot of messy text with TreeLine

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Hinkle: Linux Can Change the World Beyond Technology
  • Chromebooks and Chromium OS Experience
  • GNOME Settings Daemon 3.10.1 Fixes Memory Leaks
  • PCLinuxOS KDE MiniMe and LXDE 2013.10 Review
  • US Navy’s most advanced warship is powered by Linux
  • Happy Birthday, Ubuntu 4.10
  • Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Opens For Development
  • Debian 6.0.8 Officially Released
  • In Depth Look at Linux’s Archiving and Compression Commands
  • Writing a GNOME thumbnailer
  • Believe in openSUSE
  • Monaco: What's Yours Is Mine is coming to Linux with new content
  • openSUSE Summit Schedule Ready
  • Red Hat is Now Oversold

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Installing and Configuring CentOS
  • Dark Matter brings survival horror to PC, Mac and Linux
  • Windows 8.1, Linux, Android, and "The Next Big Thing"
  • Why system76 always ships the newest ubuntu
  • Rogue Legacy out now on Mac, Linux
  • S06E34 – Gone With The Ubuntu
  • Create custom Linux-based systems regardless of the hardware
  • Fully Bugged Little Cells Unveiled
  • Fedora Outreach Program for Women Internships
  • Bacon: Reflections On Ubuntu 13.10
  • SCALE is a first-person puzzler that has you re-sizing the world
  • Open hardware and why it is revolutionary
  • Microsoft Office fends off open source OpenOffice and LibreOffice
  • October 18, 2013 Indie Game Bundle Update

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu 13.10 Finally Released, Big Yawner
  • Special laptop keys with Linux
  • GRUB2 Editor 0.6.4 Is the Perfect Tool for Your GRUB Needs
  • GNOME Control Center 3.10.1 Released with Multiple Improvements
  • GNOME CAKE 3.10 - Fully Baked, No Bugs
  • "New Installer" Details Have Been Published
  • The Linux Setup - Tynan, SETT Developer
  • Ubuntu races toward convergence
  • Arma Tactics is now available on Steam
  • SteamOS to have NVIDIA developer tools from day one
  • Red Hat CEO Whitehurst talks about 'Team Jim'
  • How the end of XP support helped France's gendarmes embrace Ubuntu
  • AbiWord: The little word processor that could
  • Open Source Pundits Sound Off on Surveillance

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • September 2013 Linux Kernel News
  • Ubuntu Phone 13.10: The Runway Is Clear For Mir
  • Rust Survival Game From Garrys Mod Creator Coming To Linux
  • SteamOS: Worth the hype?
  • Ubuntu Spotted on Merc's Driverless Research Car [Video]
  • First Week of November 16th Options Trading For Red Hat (RHT)
  • Linux Outlaws 320 – A Little Bit Rusty
  • Linux Outlaws 321 – You Just Turned This into a Bloodbath
  • Unvanquished FPS/RTS Alpha 20 Is Out
  • Wayland-Based Hawaii Desktop Is Still Active
  • Why Linux Sucks 2009-2013
  • WebRTC Game Changer | LAS s29e01

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • First Look at GNOME 3.10 on Arch Linux
  • First Wayland Benchmarks From Fedora 20 Show Great Promise
  • Help promote openSUSE 13.1!
  • Baked in Britain, the millionth Raspberry Pi
  • The Re-Opened X.Org Server 1.15 Pushes Ahead
  • Upcoming Test Days, and Fedora 20 status
  • Valve Talks More About Nvidia GPUs Inside Steam Machines
  • Disable "Trusted Computing" Chip in Linux
  • Troubleshooting common Steam problems
  • Use your linux netbook as a charging station
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 337
  • Burning Circle Episode 134
  • Ubuntu, Knee-Deep in the Big Muddy
  • Shell Scripting vs Programming

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Intel Core i7 4960X "Ivy Bridge-E" Is A Beauty On Linux
  • A Variety of NVIDIA GPUs Power Valve’s First Prototype Steam Machines
  • Karma Machine: An Example of Ubuntu App Convergence
  • How Things Work: Open-source software
  • VIDEO: "Shovel Knight" Trailer Wears Its Influences on Its Sleeve
  • Arduino boards to run full Linux thanks to TI’s new ARM-based chip
  • Mozilla's HTML5-Powered Flash Player Is Slowly Making Its Way Into Firefox
  • I Didn’t Know They Use Open Source! – Part 3
  • Deathfire: Ruins of Nethermore Gets Gloomy First Screenshots
  • Who is the Ubuntu Community Council?
  • Scholarship Winner Sarah Kiden Will Use Linux Training to Help Others

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • PixelJunk Shooter is coming to PC, Mac and Linux next month
  • Mageia update advisories web site
  • Jobs Demand Rising for Linux and Open Source Skills
  • Rename - For Batch Renaming Of Files
  • Linux 3.12 Kernel To Bring Faster File-Systems
  • Open-Source Systems You May Have Taken for Granted: 10 Examples
  • Put a Talking Cow in Your Linux Message of the Day
  • Plasma Active Handbook released
  • Who takes free software to new heights?
  • NVIDIA Releases Major Linux Driver With New Features, EGL
  • Why and how to set up your own wiki with Dokuwiki
  • Down with Unicode! Why 16 bits per character is a right pain in the ASCII
  • How Port Knocking Can Add Extra Layer of Server Security
  • About 20% Of New Titles On Steam Support Linux
  • Firefox bug: "Pledge never to implement HTML5 DRM"
  • curl: Your tool for accessing the great beyond
  • Raphaël Hertzog: My Free Software Activities in September 2013
  • Global Git Ignore
  • Fistful Of Frags Will Come To Linux If Greenlit
  • Canonical Says It's Not Ignoring Ubuntu Desktop Because of Ubuntu Touch

some odds & ends:

Filed under
Linux
News
Hardware
OSS
  • Raspberry Pi Wireless Inventors Kit Review
  • Richard Stallman on the Painful Birth of GNU
  • Struggling With Some Linux Terminologies? Here's Help
  • Working BMO made out of Lego and Raspberry Pi
  • Call me GNU: The GNU/Linux naming debate, revisited
  • Utilite Linux Mini PC Launches With Prices Starting From Just $99
  • LibreOffice 4.1.2 Released
  • Q&A: To Use Or Not To Use Open Source Software?
  • Mastering rsync and Bash to Backup Your Linux Desktop or Server
  • PixelJunk Shooter is coming to PC, Mac and Linux next month
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE/Qt: Qt Contributor Summit 2018, Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt, FreeBSD, and Konsole

  • Qt Contributor Summit 2018
    One bit especially interesting is the graphics stack. Back in Qt 5.0, Qt took the liberty of limiting the graphics stack to OpenGL, but the world has changed since: On Windows the only proper stack is Direct3D 12, Apple introduced Metal and recently deprecated OpenGL and Vulkan is coming rather strong. It looks like embracing these systems transparently will be one of the most exciting tasks to achieve. From a KDE & Plasma perspective I don’t think this is scary, OpenGL is here to stay on Linux. We will get a Framework based on a more flexible base and we can continue pushing Plasma, Wayland, Plasma Mobile with confidence that the world won’t be crumbling. And with a bit of luck, if we want some parts to use Vulkan, we’ll have it properly abstracted already.
  • Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt
    These days, using the cloud for predictive maintenance, analytics or feature updates is a de facto standard in the automation space. Basically, any newly designed product has some server communication at its core. However, the majority of solutions in the field were designed and productized when communication technology was not at today’s level. Still, attempts are being made to attach connectivity to such solutions. The mission statement is to “cloudify” an existing solution, which uses some internal protocol or infrastructure.
  • KDE on FreeBSD – June 2018
    It’s been a while since I wrote about KDE on FreeBSD, what with Calamares and third-party software happening as well. We’re better at keeping the IRC topic up-to-date than a lot of other sources of information (e.g. the FreeBSD quarterly reports, or the f.k.o website, which I’ll just dash off and update after writing this).
  • Konsole’s search tool
    Following my konsole’s experiments from the past week I came here to show something that I’m working on with the VDG, This is the current Konsole’s Search Bar. [...] I started to fix all of those bugs and discovered that most of them happened because we had *one* search bar that was shared between every terminal view, and whenever a terminal was activated we would reposition, reparent, repaint, disconnect, reconnect the search bar. Easiest solution: Each Terminal has it’s own search bar. Setuped only once. The one bug I did not fix was the Opening / Closing one as the searchbar is inside of a layout and layouts would reposition things anyway. All of the above bugs got squashed by just moving it to TerminalDisplay, and the code got also much cleaner as there’s no need to manual intervention in many cases. On the review Kurt – the Konsole maintainer – asked me if I could try to make the Search prettier and as an overlay on top of the Terminal so it would not reposition things when being displayed.

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments. Until now, The Document Foundation only recommended the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite to bleeding-edge users while urging enterprises and mainstream users to use the well-tested LibreOffice LibreOffice 5.4 series, which reached end of life on June 11, 2018, with the last point release, LibreOffice 5.4.7. Read more

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

The Document Foundation informed Softpedia today about the general availability of the fifth point release of the LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite for all supported operating systems. LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments. Read more Direct: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.0.5