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News

some leftovers & stuff:

Filed under
News
  • This Week in Linux
  • Red Hat appoints Arun Oberoi as executive VP, global sales
  • KISS simplicity: Arch Linux
  • Even Linux Has A Greater Smartphone Market Share Than Windows Phone
  • Raspberry Pi foundation demos 14MP camera module for $35 computer
  • This Tiny PC Runs Linux and Android 4.0--and Costs Just $74
  • Microsoft, SUSE Integrate Linux Support in System Center
  • My Thoughts on QML and the Desktop
  • Apache OpenOffice made easy with YUM
  • An OS in the Public Interest - a Mandriva Linux Foundation?
  • This Cadillac Is Powered by Linux
  • Remote Desktop Options for Linux
  • IPv6 day 6 June 2012: time to do it again
  • Simon Phipps is the new OSI President
  • Who Loves Ya, Linux Baby?
  • What does the Linux 3.4 kernel have to offer?
  • Moebius Adventure Game Confirmed for Linux
  • Xenonauts confirmed for Linux

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Unity Used By Super Heroes on TV Show
  • LibreOffice mentoring
  • First Unreal Engine 4 Screens
  • systemd for Administrators, Part XIII
  • Can This Computer Empower a New Generation of Programmers?
  • Mageia 2 and the default GNOME 3 desktop
  • Always on an activity, or all. You asked for it.
  • Sending mail from bash [Script]
  • Going Linux May 19: #173 Computer America #50

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • X.Org: "A Wasteland of Unreviewedness"
  • Kindergarden Linux
  • Tips for Linux Beginners
  • The road to KDE LightDM-0.2
  • Unity3D is Already Working on a Linux Port
  • Musings on the linux audio stack
  • $200 USB Stick Size Ubuntu PC 'Cotton Candy' Starts Shipping in May
  • If it's a Linux flaw, your phone is directly threatened
  • openSUSE in Education, Spreading Continue
  • Make Ubuntu top panel transparent
  • RescueTime for Linux (beta)
  • Browse your activities
  • Parted Magic gets optional firewall
  • cups-1.6 will be loads of fun
  • Add Screensavers to Ubuntu 12.04

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Pixar's Toy Story 2 Was Nearly Lost Because Of A Linux Command
  • US Supremes hammer final nail into Psystar coffin
  • 125,000 Ubuntu PCs to land in Pakistani students' laps
  • Wil Wheaton: ‘Yo Hollywood, Let Me Download Ubuntu’
  • Fedora To Remain Monogamist Towards GCC
  • What's going on with Krita since 2.4 got released?
  • Open Source Startup Inktank Sets Gaze On Ubuntu Server
  • Linux Outlaws 265 - It Doesn't Affect Your Ball Control

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Debian Edu interview: Jürgen Leibner
  • LibreOffice - Enhance desktop productivity
  • Linux Setup - Scott Merrill, Systems Engineer/Tech Writer
  • Open source software: It’s more than just free stuff
  • Ubuntu Developer Summit 12.10 Recap
  • Linux Wins - Or Does It?
  • Linux 3.4 approaching with "calmed" RC7
  • Is Mozilla Punting on Web Apps for Linux?
  • Going Linux #172 Linux Applications-Introduction

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Mozilla Makes Firefox 13 Super Speedy
  • Open source suites go beyond Microsoft Office
  • Nvidia contributes CUDA compiler to open source
  • Something to Watch With Red Hat

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mark Shuttleworth, Open-Source Software's Sugar Daddy
  • Ubuntu TV Is A Popular Topic This Week
  • Opera 11.64 released
  • Dynamite Jack Released
  • User namespaces – available to play
  • Fedora Project is naming names
  • Compiz, Merging, Forking - Other UDS-Q Notes
  • The new Ubuntu Business Desktop Remix is out now
  • partner network, 8gb storage, applications (Vivaldi)
  • Announcing printerd
  • Calxeda Shows Live ARM-Based Cluster Running Ubuntu Linux
  • Do robots need a Linux or a Mac OS to thrive?
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 4 Episode 8

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Mageia 2 RC Released, Final Delayed
  • KDE Plasma Netbook Revisited
  • Grub 2 theme for Fedora 17
  • Vivaldi Content Store Shows Ankles For The Cinematograph
  • What Would I Tell Developers About Using Open Source Software?
  • Make an explosion effect in GIMP
  • Is Skype + Video + Linux Always a Hassle?
  • It's back! Fedora Reloaded Podcast
  • OLPC Gets Backing in Australia
  • Red Hat CEO James Whitehurst Sells Shares for $6.8M
  • 5 Alternative Search Engines That Respect Your Privacy
  • How to Create Custom Linux Live CD/USB
  • Introducing: Lunduke’s Awesome Blocks of Awesome
  • FLOSS Weekly 210

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Apache Releases OpenOffice 3.4
  • PC-BSD 9.1 installer preview
  • Download the Creative Suite 6!
  • "Good on ya' Mozilla", says Sophos about Firefox
  • Deadly 30, New Survival Horror Zombie Game
  • The Biggest Problem For A Linux PC Vendor
  • Mozilla Hiring Senior Product Manager
  • The Overhead of KDE Software
  • Doom 3 Progresses On OpenGL ES 2.0, EGL
  • Should Apache abandon OpenOffice?

few leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Getting started with Linux commands
  • Linux-libre
  • What on earth is Dracut?
  • Mozilla’s Mitchell Baker on Being the Alternative
  • 10 GNOME Shell Extensions to Install
  • Protect Your BSD – BSD Magazine (May 2012)
  • Rosa Marathon 2012lts
  • Cinnamon Desktop Review | LAS | s21e08
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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.