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News

some mixed leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Kernel Log: Coming in 3.4 (Part 2)
  • Linux From Scratch Part Two
  • LibreOffice 3.5.3 Released
  • A history of Mozilla browsers design
  • How to enforce password complexity on Linux
  • Desktop: Debian vs. CentOS
  • The Most Awesome, Least-Advertised Fedora 17 Feature
  • Future of the Desktop Market
  • Why Linux Sucks & Why Linux Does Not Suck Videos
  • Linux Outlaws 263, 264
  • Debian Project News - April 30th
  • 4 things to do after installing Bodhi
  • EA talks at Ubuntu Developer Summit
  • A review of The Linux Command Line
  • openSUSE - the upstream of SUSE Linux Enterprise
  • Moore's Law Nearing Collapse, Says Physicist
  • SoundBox Another GTK Multimedia player

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Getting Started Guide for LibreOffice 3.4
  • Review Sunflower twin panel file manager for Linux
  • Beefy Miracle Beta Review
  • What's the Deal With Red Hat?
  • Slackware Plays Nicer Than Ubuntu With Humble Bundle
  • Unsettings: Ubuntu Unity Desktop Tweaking Tool
  • Linux Outlaws 262 - Leisure Suit Larry Goes to Court
  • A New GLSL Backend For Doom 3
  • Many FSF Priority Projects Still Not Progressing
  • How to set up Raspberry Pi
  • TechTip: Unlock More Space in Linux
  • Devil Live twins of OpenBSD: the project is kicking
  • Opera gets new icon
  • Changing from Nouveau to Nvidia Graphics Drivers on LMDE 64-bit
  • Replace Oxygen with ROSA theme on any KDE-powered distribution
  • systemd Status Update
  • Nitro Task Manager Brings New Themes

recent leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 18 Might Be A Frankfurter Or Spherical Cow
  • 3 Open-Source Benchmarking Tools
  • Linux Tycoon Online Launched
  • A look at the new Plasma Active File Browser
  • Latest Linux Mint News
  • Fedora 17 + Xfce 4.10
  • 5 user-friendly applications you could be using now
  • How to create Linux live multi-boot setups - Tutorial
  • openSUSE Factory switched to GCC 4.7
  • Arduino Uno on Debian 6 Squeeze Stable
  • How High Can Red Hat Fly?
  • FreeBSD 8.3 introduces new features
  • Heinlein Support Becomes openSUSE Project Sponsor
  • Tweaking KDE's KWin For Linux Gaming Performance
  • Oracle Linux: The Past, Present and Future Revealed
  • An OS in the Public Interest - a Mandriva Linux Foundation?
  • The Humble Botanicula Bundle

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Avadon: The Black Fortress On Gameolith for Linux
  • Bridge Linux 2012
  • Government of Malaysia Continues to Increase Usage of FLOSS
  • New package search on software.opensuse.org
  • KDE 4.8.2 Maintenance Release Out — Grab it
  • How To Fix Broken Packages In Ubuntu Or Debian
  • GCC 4.8 Aims To Switch To C++ Mode By Default
  • Automatically Lock Your Computer
  • Tip en Tricks about RPM Commands
  • Early Easter present in Fedora 17 beta
  • 6 Dropbox Tips and Tricks for Linux Users
  • BerliOS Projects Saved, Moving to SourceForge
  • How to create an animated gif from a video using mplayer
  • Open Build Service Delivers Website Integration
  • Floss Weekly Episode 206: Chamilo
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 449

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Review: “The Linux Command Line”
  • How to Back Up Your Linux System With Back In Time
  • Clear recent documents in Gnome 3
  • Why Not Open Source?
  • Securing GNOME 3.2.1 openSUSE 12.1
  • Introduction to AnoN-1mOS a new Linux Distribution
  • Nifty Vim Tricks
  • Reset account password (Ubuntu Linux) without CD
  • Stop An Application From Being Updated in Ubuntu
  • rc.local in Fedora
  • Open Source in Automotive Industry Rising
  • Linux Outlaws 259 - Turn to the Purple Side

recent leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux 'internet of things' gizmo ships
  • Ex-Googler Fears Google's Greed, Protects People From It
  • Dell Linux Engineers work over 5000 bugs with Red Hat
  • Enea adds Linux to OS offering
  • ‘Moniz’ gets a logo
  • TACC Releases Open Source Display Tiling Package
  • HP says it will commit to Linux as market share rises
  • Linux 3.4 will support GeForce GTX 680 and Southern Islands GPUs
  • Why Linux Needs Malware Protection
  • Android Apps in Linux Changes Everything
  • PCLinuxOS Magazine Openbox Special Edition

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Five easy-to-use Linux encryption tools
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 "Kepler" On Linux? (on Windows)
  • Nouveau Project Has Huge Surprises Today
  • gnome 3 got my goat
  • Reality Check on Ubuntu's Enterprise Claims
  • Kernel Log: Drivers for new Radeon GPUs
  • Master Linux Now! 2012 - On Sale Now
  • 2012 Will be The Year of The GNU/Linux Desktop
  • Commodore outs Linux-running Amiga Mini desktop
  • Carla Schroder: Whoever controls technology controls society
  • Getting the integrated fingerprint reader on my laptop to work in Linux
  • Kubuntu and the state of free consumer software
  • LibreOffice 3.4.6 Released
  • Ubuntu 12.04 Development update
  • Xubuntu 12.04 Beta Screenshots
  • Bodhi Linux 1.4.0 Released
  • Drupal Open Source is Built on Passion (and soon Symfony)
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 447

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Puzzle Game 'Me And My Shadow' Is Quite Challenging
  • Dear Esther: A Source Engine Game On Linux
  • Talk Of GCC 5.0 To Be Modular, More Like LLVM
  • Simply Linux improves and polishes
  • Whoops, There's A Big Problem For Wayland GTK+
  • Distrowatch Top 20-somethings
  • GloboNote: A Sticky Notes Tool on Steroids
  • Linpus Lite Desktop 1.7 screen shot preview
  • My Dream Tablet Running GNU/Linux: The LINTAB
  • The Children of Linux
  • openSUSE 12.2 Milestone 2 Screenshot Tour
  • GNOME 2 vs. GNOME 3
  • A Linux Game That's Still Not Selling Well
  • 5 Ways To Make Linux Boot Faster
  • Dell Surveys Customers on GNU/Linux
  • Drupal's Plan for Open Source CMS Success
  • Interview: Richard Stallman
  • Bryan Hates Freedom | LAS | s21e01
  • Linux Outlaws 256 - The Beards are Coming!!!

few leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Kubuntu Active is Activated
  • Is Linux About to Take Off On Tablets?
  • Linux servers keep growing, Windows & Unix keep shrinking
  • Nvidia's Excellent Linux Adventure
  • Linux File System -- Analyzing Fsck Test Results

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Conspiracy in Linux – The Debian Underworld
  • PC-BSD Teams With DuckDuckGo to Provide Enhanced Web Searches
  • Fedora Linux 16: A Business Powerhouse, in Pictures
  • Linux kernel 3.3 delayed
  • Open Source Coopetition Fueled by LF Growth
  • debian contributions to the linux kernel
  • Get Your Linux Game On
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 256
  • openSUSE Stable Maintenance Process Now Fully Open
  • GIMP 2.7.5 (last test before GIMP 2.8) now available
  • Raspberry Pi retailers clarify shipping costs on $35 Linux computer
  • This week in Fedora 17: Test Days galore
  • Easily Create Your Own Distribution Using Ubuntu Builder
  • Using Gimp in George
  • Keep an Eye on Your GNU/Linux System with Glances
  • Fedora 17 New Security Feature part VIII - New SELinux Domains
  • Making Compiler, Disk Testing More Reproducible
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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.