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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Preparing For The Linux 3.1 Kernel
  • 6 Free Full-Length Hollywood Films You Can Watch On YouTube
  • Top 10 Things Steve Jobs Never Said
  • Acquia Raises $15 Million, Plans Drupal Sales Push
  • Blocks That Matter Tech Demo Updated
  • LF New White Paper on FOSS Compliance
  • Geeqie: A Lightweight Image Viewer on Ubuntu
  • Preview: What's Coming Up In VectorLinux 7?
  • Open Source Licensing: Risk and Opportunity
  • Can Novell BrainShare Serve Three Masters?
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 3 Episode 14
  • Harmony's curiously flat tune
  • Free Software for Little People
  • Open source Vs proprietary: the war goes on!
  • Going Linux Jul 21: #145 Linux Antivirus-Introduction

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • New Look Ubuntu Software Centre Delayed Until 12.04?
  • The OLPC XO-3 will include a laser ray gun!
  • SUSE Studio 1.2 ships, full cloud strategy soon
  • Kororaa 15 (Squirt) Beta 2 released
  • Meet the GIMP Episode 163: Colour Curves
  • New Open Source Initiative for Automotive Software Development
  • Fedora Community (the app) Update
  • Open Source Contributors - The Days of Volunteers is Over
  • Red Hat EVP, CFO Charles E Jr Peters Sells 5,532 Shares
  • FLOSS Weekly 175: Taskwarrior
  • Google Is Closing Google Labs
  • SUSE Studio spins up on IBM mainframes

Online game store launched for Linux community

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News

The concept of online game stores for games that are compatible with Windows has been around for some time now. Ubuntu lovers had also wished for a Store especially for games that run on Ubuntu. Well the wait is finally over.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Can We Trust Microsoft?
  • rekonq, 1 feature a week. #2
  • Chrome OS, like Tux, will never fly
  • Mandriva taking requests for new build system
  • Kernel Log: Further problems with UEFI
  • Sabayon to abandon GNOME 2
  • 10 things to think about to improve software product descriptions
  • S2TC: A Possible Workaround For The S3TC Patent Situation
  • The strategy behind Mono has shifted
  • Intel, Collabora and SUSE to be main sponsors of the Desktop Summit
  • 4 Key Principles for Open source Projects
  • OnLive Is Hiring More Engineers For Linux Client
  • Free hypervisor adds virtual machine cloning
  • Upstream Virtualbox + openssl versions on mandriva
  • Interview: Kuno Woudt, MusicBrainz
  • Mark’s Quick Gimp Tip
  • Red Hat Confirms Plans for North America Partner Conference
  • NVIDIA Proposes Extending RandR
  • HP TouchPad 32GB WebOS tablet

odds & ends:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Moving the screenlocker into compiz
  • systemd for Administrators, Part IX
  • Why Corporations Favors The Apache License Over The GPL/LGPL
  • Live USB Drive | LAS | s17e08
  • A Closet Misanthrope’s View of Online Social Networking
  • highlight a target in a photo with a simulated spotlight in GIMP
  • Steampunk beautiful theme for KDM and ksplash (openSUSE)
  • Hacking together my digital artifacts with a wifi picture frame
  • Using getmail to backup Gmail on Linux

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • FLARE 0.14, 0.14.1 and a new video
  • KDE Community Keynote Interview: Stuart Jarvis
  • Mad, Mad Intervew
  • The touch command does more than just create empty files
  • Logitech Webcam On Ubuntu
  • SuperTuxKart 7.2 Final Has Been Released
  • install PCLinuxOS 2011.6 on an encrypted LVM
  • Install Elementary Music App BeatBox in Ubuntu 11.04 from PPA
  • make your own 20th Century Fox / LIONSGATE intro with Blender in 5 min
  • Creating Startup Scripts with Bash

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Specto - follow events in your desktop
  • Maximized windows in Compiz
  • OpenOffice.org in Apache: The Next Step
  • How I learned to love Free Software
  • Kororaa 15 (Squirt) Beta released
  • Gentoaster – Week 7 progress report
  • NVIDIA 275.19 Linux Driver Published
  • Patent trolls chase app developers out of the U.S.
  • Ubuntu Surfboard
  • "Comics With Krita" Training DVD
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 10th July

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Passing on the Linux dream
  • Install 'Stunt Rally' Game in Ubuntu from PPA
  • Simple screen/window grabbing
  • Maximum Calculus with Maxima
  • Interview: Thomas Thwaite, designer and technologist
  • LinuxFormat Praises MEPIS and Anti-MEPIS
  • As Facebook Shows Its Fear, Open-Xchange Bounces Back
  • 28 Beautiful Wallpapers seen on WebUpd8
  • Windows 7 vs. Linux With Sandy Bridge New Acceleration Architecture
  • Linux Mint 11 LXDE RC2 released!
  • Spotify launches unlimited free US service
  • Olive Healthcare Slashes IT Costs by Migrating to Linux OS
  • SPDX Readies a New Specification for License and Copyright Reporting
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 411

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Unity breaks Bluefish
  • DesktopNova - changes the wallpaper automatically
  • Do Python Coding with NINJA-IDE
  • Where Did All the Idealism Go?
  • Spotify: Tomorrow's the day for U.S. launch
  • Unity Report for 13 July
  • News from GNOME Shell land
  • Five Beautiful Plank Themes
  • Telecom Service Provider Handles Huge Volumes of Data Using FOSS
  • VC funding for OSS-related vendors in Q2
  • Sourceforge Project of the Month July 2011: Moodle
  • Status Update: Plasma MediaCenter
  • FLOSS Weekly 174: Enano CMS
  • UCOSP: A model for getting undergraduates involved in Open Source
  • Samba may consider accepting corporate-donated code ... fixes only?
  • Canary Islands - OSS to forecast and manage forest fires
  • Neat Timelapse Video Made in Ubuntu Using Open-Source Apps

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Knoppix 6.4: can you spot the difference?
  • I finally found you Xfce and I am not going to let you go!
  • BackupRotator - Utility to rotate backup and log files
  • Lots of Support for One Percent!
  • Red Hat Breaks Through at $44.87
  • Zippl again – now in the package
  • Shuttleworth: Fantastic engineering management is…
  • Time And Materials? – NOT!
  • Slow?
  • Game Editor to create your game, on Linux
  • Tax-on-web with Debian and Firefox
  • 63 Open Source Replacements for Popular Financial Software
  • The idea behind Contour
  • Android Is The Linux Dream Come True?
  • Gwibber Gets Revamped For Ubuntu 11.10
  • The importance of trademarks, even for an open source business
  • Firefox 8 (Yes, 8) Is Getting A Massive Speed Boost
  • BootMed Teaches You How to Save Ailing PCs
  • Project Euler
  • static single assignment for functional programmers
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

today's howtos