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today's highlights:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Stella 6.3 - Simple, elegant and beautiful
  • Build an Arch Linux system from scratch
  • Maintaining history – done wrong
  • Two Simple Tricks with Shell Scripts To Improve Your Productivity
  • My Linux Rig: Nick Schermer, Xfce Developer
  • GIMP 2.8 and the Taming of Two Decades' Graphics Habits
  • Santoku a new Linux distro focused on Security
  • Ubuntu 12.10: 32-bit vs. 64-bit Linux Performance
  • Linux Outlaws 279 – Double Oh Seventy

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Debian undecided on method for secure boot
  • More Linux!
  • systemd for Administrators, Part XVI
  • Text Mode for Fedora 18
  • Fedora: Some basic tips with Yum
  • Raspberry Pis Burned by Counterfeit Apple Chargers
  • Fedora 19 Might Be A Prime Rib Or Crop Circle
  • There's Still Interest In A Fedora Software Center
  • Fedora is retiring Smolt hardware census
  • The Performance Between GCC Optimization Levels
  • Linux Format 164 On Sale Today - Linux at CERN!

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux on ARM breakthrough to take away Torvalds' arse pain
  • A few thoughts on cloud computing
  • Linux Install Fest by the Numbers
  • 3D Space Combat Game 'Salvation Prophecy' Coming to Linux
  • LibreOffice Writer now supports first page header/footer
  • NoteCase Is Back in Pro Form - but There's a Hitch
  • Adobe Patches Flash Player in Masssive Security Update
  • How to Reset Unity in Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu 12.10 ‘Quantal Quetzal’: Beta 2 Sneak Peek
  • A Significant Release Of DragonFlyBSD Coming Up
  • KDE Pens Manifesto
  • 1366x768 not allowed in EDID block. You need modeline. Here's how.
  • Simple trick that lets you code twice as fast
  • Ubuntu's Shopping Lens Might Be Illegal in Europe
  • Jim Whitehurst's big idea: Effective leaders must operate as catalysts
  • Major Unvanquished update (Alpha 8)
  • First openSUSE Conference Sneak Peek
  • Password Tools: Creating secure passwords and testing their quality
  • Four Games to Increase Your Vocabulary and General Knowledge
  • Tuxradar Open Ballot: What can Linux really steal from Apple?
  • Keep Your Desktop Fresh with Variety Wallpaper Changer

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Two Slackware Derivatives Still Alive
  • Scratch, a programming language for kids
  • Solus Eveline 1.2: good for newbies
  • Work at Linux Format!
  • Linux 3.8 Kernel May Have Better Nouveau Re-Clocking
  • KDE's KWin Gears Up To Advance At Faster Pace
  • Rekonq 2 Web Browser Enters Development For KDE
  • Build a file server with the Raspberry Pi
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.8.0: The Apps Generation
  • Watch HDTV from Internet on your TV with Linux PC (Legally)
  • KLook from File->Open/Save dialogs Added
  • KWin maintainer to join Blue Systems
  • Top Three Unix Tools
  • Compete In Rigs Of Rods Multiplayer!
  • How To Boot (Embedded) Linux In Under One Second
  • One Linux for all ARM systems
  • Cinnarch – Where Arch Meets Cinnamon
  • Let your creativity explode with MyPaint!
  • OpenShot Founder Interview | LAS | s23e10

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Replace Lilo Splash with Mayan Slackware 14.0
  • The Linux Setup - Terry Hancock, Journalist/Producer
  • The Staging Pull Goes In For Linux 3.7 Kernel
  • Linux on the Desktop Dead? More Alive then Never - 750 Desktops at Portugal
  • Open source equals software freedom, not free software
  • Every detail matters – Round 2
  • FLOSS Weekly 228
  • Going Linux Oct 5 #186
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 473

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The history of OpenOffice shows why licensing matters
  • Linux certificate program launches in North America
  • Bacon: The Canonical Community Team and 13.04
  • Publish a book with LyX
  • The Open Hardware Summit: The Future of Manufacturing is Sharing
  • Using wview to monitor the weather on your own weather station
  • Millikin University Does its Homework
  • Firefox quit warning message bug
  • The Fox in the FOSS Henhouse
  • Change GRUB Splash Image, Background, Font Color on Your Linux

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fuduntu Gets New Release
  • What's holding back mainstream Drupal adoption?
  • The shocking OpenSuSE 12.2 KDE, plus an unexpected surprise
  • Debian relicenses its logo
  • GNOME: Firefox extensions and wider availability
  • Vim: The Hidden Power of Customization
  • Features vs. Benefits
  • ProjectLibre: October 2012 Project of the Month
  • PC-BSD 9.1 Review | LAS | s23e09
  • Microsoft will be saved by open-source
  • S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Clear Sky - Late Verdict
  • New Security Feature in Fedora 18 Part 2:

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • wattOS R6 Review – Go green with Linux
  • Deli(cate) Linux
  • 'Hostile Takeover' Alpha Released for Linux
  • Steam for Linux a Bad Idea? - This Week in Linux Gaming (video)

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • What to Expect from Steam on Linux
  • out of disk storage space, but there is still free space!!
  • How Does Linux Inspire? (video)
  • Top Business Intelligence Software for Linux
  • RKHunter: checking for Root Kits and Intrusions on Linux
  • nvidia cards on gentoo
  • CrossOver - Will you make me convert?
  • Gnome 3.8 Features: Integrated Application Search
  • Who needs GLX? KWin doesn't
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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.