Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

News

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ranking Linux distributions, and the decline of the traditional distros
  • New Security Feature in Fedora 19 Part 3: Hard Link/Soft Link Protection
  • Open-source office suite written in Java
  • Updated history of the 2.6.16-stable kernel
  • Pidora 18 (Raspberry Pi Fedora Remix) Release
  • From subversive to mainstream: Looking back on 18 years
  • Rktcr coming soon to Linux, demo out now!
  • BSD Magazine (May 2013): Jails Firewall with PF
  • SELinux policy for incron: what does it do?
  • The Luminosity of Free Software, Episode 13
  • Microsoft releases Skype for Linux 4.2
  • Synaptic update error in Debian Jessie
  • Designing Electronics with Linux
  • FLOSS Weekly 252
  • Raspberry Pi Gets New Wayland Weston Renderer
  • Megabyte punch from Electro Games Will be on Linux also
  • vnstat: Network logging over time
  • The Cheapskate's Corner
  • Debian GNU/Hurd 2013 released
  • Debian Project mourns the loss of Ray Dassen

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • rekonq, working on extension support
  • Two Useful Apps to View CPU Info in Linux
  • CrunchBang 11 Waldorf
  • Dynamic DNS—an Object Lesson in Problem Solving
  • mrzoom: Not really for the underpowered
  • Maintain A Local Repo
  • Customizing Unity
  • Top Ten Sleeper Distros
  • 7 Linux Date Command Examples
  • Linux System Programming, 2ed
  • ZevenOS-Neptune 3.1 Efficiently Combines KDE and Debian 7.0
  • Unlicensed code: Movement or Madness?
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 317
  • Another week of rawhide (2013-05-21 edition)
  • Free and open source support for RAR archives in Fedora
  • Accessing the Raspberry Pi’s 1MHz timer
  • Steganography- Hide Your Files Inside An Image In Linux
  • Blender 2.67a Released
  • GNU Hackers Meeting 2013
  • Samsung Talks About Its Aggressive Linux Talent Recruitment Strategy
  • Linux gamers trying to convince Blizzard, EA and Co.
  • Okular welcomes configurable review tools
  • Behold: A Newer, Better Firefox
  • Linux and Google Chrome get cozy with Kernel 2.9

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mageia 3: Here's what I gained and what I lost
  • kmail2 still not suitable for on-the-road use :(
  • New 32-way Raspberry Pi cluster built by US PhD candidate
  • Evolus Pencil: A Great Microsoft Visio Alternative For Linux
  • Ubuntu: Restoring the Community Link
  • hnb: Quick, clever and clean
  • Linux Games: Haunt
  • How to Keep SSH Connections Alive In Linux
  • Bacon: Respect in Community Discussion and Debate
  • Icculus on Oculus Rift
  • Is The Canadian Government Rolling Out GNU/Linux Clients?
  • HOT Raspberry Pi DIY Mini Desktop PC Build
  • Uninstall Windows or Linux After Dual-Booting
  • 5 Linux Features You Want in Your Company
  • Status Line in Vim
  • Finally! Lightworks Runs On Debian GNU/Linux
  • Microsoft Office Clone Updates Interface, Improves File Support
  • BSDTalk interview with Kris Moore (PC-BSD)
  • Removing unwanted applications in Debian
  • Making Linux and Android Get Along
  • The secret to great reporting with Drupal 7

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KWin running in Weston
  • Is Google abusing its power?
  • Unix/Linux File Recognition. Did You Know?
  • Get better desktop performance with pf-kernel
  • How to transform a Debian based system to a Debian Edu installation
  • Flareget a great download manager for Linux
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 review - A surprise
  • Bash Functions for more a powerful Alias
  • OpenPandora review, part two
  • Btrfs vs. EXT4 vs. XFS vs. F2FS On Linux 3.10
  • Linux, Standards and the Enterprise: Why Red Hat is Best
  • Add Alacarte Menu Editor to Fedora 18 Xfce
  • Linux Basement - Episode 79 - Great Googly Moogly

few odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • openSUSE 13.1 Off to the Races
  • Watch and record live TV on your Raspberry Pi
  • Can gaming be the turning point for Linux on the desktop?
  • Red Hat CEO Whitehurst on innovation, OpenStack, Hadoop
  • Infotainment is the First Target for Open Source in Cars
  • 10 Tech Terms Even Non-Geeks Should Know
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 505

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Not all laptops are designed equal
  • OpenSUSE Considers Replacing LXDE With E17
  • XO Tablet Supposedly Becomes Available on June 1
  • Migrate From MySQL To MariaDB In FreeBSD
  • Can't update Iceweasel from Experimental on Wheezy
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 5 Episode 8

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • 100% Linux is Impractical
  • Overriding the default SELinux policies
  • SlateBook x2: Tegra 4-powered Android hybrid
  • Debian Users Update Flash
  • Drupal Is a Framework
  • Measuring Linux By the VAR Metric
  • EasyUbuntu Equivalent For Fedora: EasyLife
  • using grep with more than one expression
  • A complete computer smaller than a grain of sand
  • Linux vs Windows 2013: An Objective Comparison (video)
  • Introduction To The Linux Command Line
  • Mixxx sees new release
  • FOSS Knowledge, Part 3: Reaching the goal
  • Configuring Gmail as a Sendmail email relay
  • How to install Linux on a vintage 68K Mac
  • Anomaly 2 Released
  • X3: Albion Prelude Released For Linux Gamers

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Is Mozilla Firefox 21 A 'Healthy' Browser?
  • Second alpha release of Debian Edu / Skolelinux Wheezy
  • How to navigate in Vim
  • Why I’m not writing off Nvidia’s Shield
  • How to install skype on debian 64-bit
  • Install Ubuntu on a Chromebook Pixel
  • Antergos Erases Cinnarch with Inaugural Release
  • XBMC used for in hotel system
  • GNOME Control Center 3.8.2 Released with Minor Improvements
  • Rawhide week of fun, 2013-05-14
  • SUSE Helps Italian Catering Group Cut Costs
  • Linux commands: Newusers adds new users
  • The Ultimate Fedora Code Name Generator
  • Unix Architecture Showing it's Age

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Top 10 Computer Tricks Every Geek Should Know
  • News in kdepim 4.11: Header theme (1/3)
  • Portable Package Formats
  • Cinnarch successor Antergos arrives
  • Steam on Linux: everything you need to know
  • a golden wallpaper
  • Martin Gräßlin: Mir in Kubuntu, Jonathan Riddell: On Same
  • Toward a more colorful LibreOffice
  • Linux Command Line Alternatives
  • SimplyMEPIS 12 Reaches Beta Quality
  • Canonical Vows to Maintain Community Focus
  • Some Weather and System Conky Configs
  • Indirect Dependencies Are Killing Open Source Licenses
  • Review: Hairy Tales has been released for Linux
  • aspell: A spellchecker at the console
  • ROSA Desktop Fresh LXDE alpha preview
  • Open Data, Creative Destruction and Money
  • Building for your version of openSUSE in 5 simple steps!
  • Mozilla: Personalization with Respect
  • A Windows Developer’s Brutal Explanation As To Why Microsoft Is Falling Behind
  • Book Review: Raspberry Pi in Easy Steps
  • Fixing high CPU usage in Linux Mint 13 on ThinkPads
  • Home, My Backup Data Center
  • Linux Outlaws 310 – Glusterfuck

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KDE Manifesto: On The Doorstep
  • Which Linux Distribution would you save? The Results
  • The heroes of Fedora updates testing in Q1 2013
  • Half-Life 2 has been released for Linux
  • Protect Yourself Online With Tor, TAILS, and Debian
  • Gaming with Linux: Growing the game and app market
  • cgroups: A BIG WIN for Systemd
  • Finnix 108 Distro Fixes CD Tray Ejection Bug
  • Mount Android 4.0 with gvfs on Ubuntu
  • Results of Apache OpenOffice 4.0 Logo Survey
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.