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News

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Top 10 Computer Tricks Every Geek Should Know
  • News in kdepim 4.11: Header theme (1/3)
  • Portable Package Formats
  • Cinnarch successor Antergos arrives
  • Steam on Linux: everything you need to know
  • a golden wallpaper
  • Martin Gräßlin: Mir in Kubuntu, Jonathan Riddell: On Same
  • Toward a more colorful LibreOffice
  • Linux Command Line Alternatives
  • SimplyMEPIS 12 Reaches Beta Quality
  • Canonical Vows to Maintain Community Focus
  • Some Weather and System Conky Configs
  • Indirect Dependencies Are Killing Open Source Licenses
  • Review: Hairy Tales has been released for Linux
  • aspell: A spellchecker at the console
  • ROSA Desktop Fresh LXDE alpha preview
  • Open Data, Creative Destruction and Money
  • Building for your version of openSUSE in 5 simple steps!
  • Mozilla: Personalization with Respect
  • A Windows Developer’s Brutal Explanation As To Why Microsoft Is Falling Behind
  • Book Review: Raspberry Pi in Easy Steps
  • Fixing high CPU usage in Linux Mint 13 on ThinkPads
  • Home, My Backup Data Center
  • Linux Outlaws 310 – Glusterfuck

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KDE Manifesto: On The Doorstep
  • Which Linux Distribution would you save? The Results
  • The heroes of Fedora updates testing in Q1 2013
  • Half-Life 2 has been released for Linux
  • Protect Yourself Online With Tor, TAILS, and Debian
  • Gaming with Linux: Growing the game and app market
  • cgroups: A BIG WIN for Systemd
  • Finnix 108 Distro Fixes CD Tray Ejection Bug
  • Mount Android 4.0 with gvfs on Ubuntu
  • Results of Apache OpenOffice 4.0 Logo Survey

even more odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • CrunchBang 11 “Waldorf” – Overview and Screenshots
  • Handy Linux tools With Python
  • Installer memory usage in F19 Beta TC3
  • The Samsung U1000 Ubuntu Phone Isn’t Real
  • How to install GRUB customizer in ubuntu 13.04
  • Change your Grub options with Grub Customizer
  • BSDTalk Interview with Marshall Kirk McKusick and George Neville-Neil
  • Fedora and Ubuntu Kernel Config Comparison
  • Half-Life 2, EP1, EP2 and Lost Coast hit Linux!
  • LinuxDevices.com vanishes from the Web
  • Install TrueCrypt on Linux

more odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Raspberry Pi operating systems: 5 reviewed and rated
  • Raspberry Pi housed inside a computer monitor
  • From squeeze to wheezy and back, and how not to backup your / filesystem
  • Fix Rebellious Screen Backlights
  • Steam Taken Down for 30 Minutes Due to Multiple Hardware Failures
  • The Breakouts: UEFI
  • LibreOffice, Blender, and KDE, Oh My
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 504

few odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Linux, Freedom and Cold Cash (blog safari)
  • ISS PCs to switch to Linux
  • Ceph improves Red Hat support in new release
  • How An Open Source Operating System Jumpstarted Robotics Research
  • Is it time to give KVM hypervisor a go?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • A short introduction to TPMs
  • MiraBox Review – Super Raspberry Pi?
  • Module turns Raspberry Pi into robot navigation computer
  • What's So Great About Open-Source IMS?
  • Video: Vivaldi (KDE Plasma) Tablet Hardware Porn
  • Raspberry Pi and Valve Top Keynote Speaker Line Up for LinuxCon
  • FOSS Knowledge, Part 1: Where Are We Now?
  • Trying to Tame the Tablet
  • FLOSS Weekly 251
  • The Luminosity of Free Software, Episode 12

some more leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • How to Make Ubuntu 13.04 Look Like Windows 7
  • People behind ubuntu quality: Javier
  • Facts and Fictions About GNU/Linux Desktops
  • New repoman option “–include-arches”
  • Knock for OpenSSH
  • Sizing up open source: Not so simple
  • Overview of Linux capabilities, part 2, part 3
  • Vriting Vim Plugins in Python
  • EasyShutdown: Lets you Schedule Shutdowns in Ubuntu
  • Free (with strings attached): Keeping track of open-source code
  • Build your own cloud – Tutorial
  • Linux Outlaws 309 – I’m with Lex Luthor
  • LinuxFest NW PT 2 | LAS s26e09
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 315
  • How to Dual Boot and Virtualize the Same Partition on Your Computer
  • $599 for Alienware X51 mini gaming PC with Ubuntu

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Do unseen passwords really need masking?
  • Elive 2.1.40 Is Based on Debian 7.0 Wheezy
  • Xubuntu 13.04 review - Et tu, Brute?
  • improve Ubuntu Laptop Power Management
  • Ten Reasons Why You Can Use GNU/Linux
  • How Linux found its home in the enterprise
  • Upgrade from squeeze to wheezy
  • The Bank, the Budget and the OS Shocker
  • A Review of UbuntuKylin: Chinese ubuntu
  • The Linux Setup - Gary Newell, EverydayLinuxUser.com
  • ‘Effects’ of Using ‘preload’ (‘readahead daemon’) in Ubuntu 13.04
  • What Social Media (And the World) Owes to Open Source
  • Adventures in PC-BSD LXDE Part 1

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Monty Widenius: There is no reason at all to use MySQL
  • The Elegant Mageia Linux Prepares a New Release
  • Linux Shorts: Sabayon 13.04, Korora 18, and SythOS
  • Mozilla Releases Firefox OS Sim 3 As Extension
  • Mapping the Apache Software Foundation
  • Linux Mint 14: Sound Issues
  • People behind ubuntu quality: Sergio
  • Spy vs. Spy; Wikipedia Sports New DB
  • The first web server, first web browser
  • I am vi, the great and powerful . .
  • Auto-EDID Results [updated]
  • Dear Schmuck
  • Turbulenz Game Engine Open-Sourced
  • Weekly Fedora kernel bug statistics – May 03
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 503

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • XFS In Linux 3.10 To Put On Extra Protection
  • Interview with the openSUSE derivative FuSE Team
  • new release of KDE SC on Windows
  • manually download, compile and install RHEL 6 updates
  • devtodo: Much to do, about something
  • Portal Confirmed on Steam for Linux
  • Email App Inky Coming to Linux ‘Soon’
  • LibreOffice Unconfirmed Bug Statistics for March
  • Ten New Kernel Vulnerabilities Affect Ubuntu 12.10
  • Arch Linux on Raspberry Pi Running XFCE
  • How To Change Time Zone In MYSQL
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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Fonts, Jupyter, and Open Source FPGAs

  • 11 Best Programming Fonts
    There are many posts and sites comparing fonts for programming and they are all amazing articles. So why I repeated the same subject here? Since I always found myself lost in dozens of fonts and could not finger out which one was best for me. So today I tried many fonts and picked up the following fonts for you. These fonts are pretty popular and easy to get. And most importantly, all these fonts are FREE!
  • New open-source web apps available for students and faculty
    Jupyter is an open source web environment for writing code and visualizing data. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly popular across a wide range of academic disciplines. [...] JupyterHub is a variation of the Jupyter project, which adds support for user account management and enterprise authentication. The TLT instance allows students and faculty to log in with their credentials for full access to their own Jupyter environment and provides direct access to their Penn State Access Account Storage Space (PASS). Using PASS for storage provided a large persistent storage space that students and faculty were already familiar with and was easily accessible from the local lab systems or their personal devices.
  • An Ultrasound Driver With Open Source FPGAs
    Ultrasound imaging has been around for decades, but Open Source ultrasound has not. While there are a ton of projects out there attempting to create open ultrasound devices, most of this is concentrated on the image-processing side of things, and not the exceptionally difficult problem of pinging a sensor at millions of times a second, listening for the echo, and running that through a very high speed ADC. For his entry into the Hackaday Prize, [kelu124] is doing just that. He’s building an ultrasound board that’s built around Open Hardware, a fancy Open Source FPGA, and a lot of very difficult signal processing. It also uses some Rick and Morty references, so you know this is going to be popular with the Internet peanut gallery. The design of the ultrasound system is based around an iCE40 FPGA, the only FPGA with an Open Source toolchain. Along with this, there are a ton of ADCs, a DAC, pulsers, and a high voltage section to drive the off-the-shelf ultrasound head. If you’re wondering how this ultrasound board interfaces with the outside world, there’s a header for a Raspberry Pi on there, too, so this project has the requisite amount of blog cred.

today's howtos

FUD and Openwashing

OSS Leftovers

  • Eudora saved thanks to open sourcing
    It took the organisation some five years of wrangling with the Eudora's IP owner Qualcomm, but eventually the once much-loved Mac then more software got given the open source greenlight. Eudora was created in 1988 by Steve Dorner while he was working at the University of Illinois. As email started to get big in the world of computing so too did Eudora in the mid-1990s. Qualcomm licensed the software from the University of Illinois and hired Dorner.
  • Top 10 Weirdest Names for Open Source Projects
    In the early stages of developing a new open source project, most developers rarely take the time to think about their future branding strategy. After all, a great idea, top notch code, and a passionate following are the winning formula when you’re getting a project underway. However the name you choose for your project can play a role in picking up a loyal following and attracting the curious. Names have power. They indicate tone and the intent. They can, if chosen well, inspire and unify action. They’re an important part of a project’s brand and tone of voice.
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Katran
    While engineers are likely to implement hardware-based solutions for handling network load balance, Facebook’s scale of operation far outweighed the practicality of hardware load balancing, instead requiring the development of a lightweight software solution. The current result of Facebook’s efforts is its latest open-source release, scalable network load balancer Katran.
  • How Far Is Far Enough?

    Now, a new project from the Memento team holds out the promise of similar optimizations for more generic Web sites. The concept for Memento Tracer is to crowd-source a database of webrecorder.io-like crawls of complex Web sites in a form that can be analyzed to generate abstract templates similar to the platform templates on which LOCKSS plugins are mostly based. [...]