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News

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • 'Lilly Looking Through' Adventure Game is Just Beautiful
  • 5 Nice GNOME 3.4 Themes
  • Humble Indie Bundle in Ubuntu
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 457
  • This Week in Linux
  • Floss Weekly 212 - Gentoo
  • Ubuntu 12.04 (review)
  • First monitor calibration using ColorHug
  • Tonido, an Opera Unite Alternative?
  • Download and Organize Photos with Fotobasher
  • Linux system debugging super tutorial
  • OpenOffice – A House Of Sand
  • ERROR: database disk image is malformed in Fedora 17
  • AMD admits it has to work on improving Linux OpenCL support
  • Tiny & Big in: Grandpa’s Leftovers Now Available for Pre-order
  • A Bodhi Linux 2.0.0 Beginning
  • Start your Linux terminal with a running train

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Why Doesn't Fedora 17 Linux Have a Beefy Miracle Theme?
  • Linux Desktop Environments
  • Why do I contribute to open source?
  • Overgrowth finally supports Linux
  • 10 Classic UNIX and C Programming Books to Enrich Your Library
  • LF Announces New Tool for Tracking Free and Open Source Software Components
  • Jobs That Nobody Qualifies For
  • Bootstrapping Awesome: Gentoo Miniconf 2012 in Prague, CZ
  • Don’t Make Us Treat Our Customers Like Criminals!
  • SUSECon and openSUSE Conference 2012: A One-Two Punch?

yesterday's eye catchers

Filed under
News
  • 10 things to do after installing Linux Mint 13
  • Xubuntu 12.04: upgrade, how it should be
  • New Ubuntu Phone Concept
  • How to Repair GRUB2 When Ubuntu Won’t Boot
  • Software Freedom Conservancy's Coordinated Compliance Efforts
  • Open source still feared within Whitehall, says IT architect
  • Fedora 17 Review | LAS | s22e01
  • The Linux Setup - Lee Hachadoorian, Geographer
  • Red Hat to support Korean financial firms’ migration to open-source platforms
  • XFS, Btrfs, EXT4 Battle It Out On Linux 3.4

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Moonlight, the open source Silverlight project for Linux, is dead
  • Oracle's Patent 'Disaster': Beginning of a Bright New Era?
  • Linux: Rising Star in the IT Cloud
  • Open source and the National Security Agency, together again
  • ZaReason Upgrades Open Source PC Line

some leftovers & stuff:

Filed under
News
  • This Week in Linux
  • Red Hat appoints Arun Oberoi as executive VP, global sales
  • KISS simplicity: Arch Linux
  • Even Linux Has A Greater Smartphone Market Share Than Windows Phone
  • Raspberry Pi foundation demos 14MP camera module for $35 computer
  • This Tiny PC Runs Linux and Android 4.0--and Costs Just $74
  • Microsoft, SUSE Integrate Linux Support in System Center
  • My Thoughts on QML and the Desktop
  • Apache OpenOffice made easy with YUM
  • An OS in the Public Interest - a Mandriva Linux Foundation?
  • This Cadillac Is Powered by Linux
  • Remote Desktop Options for Linux
  • IPv6 day 6 June 2012: time to do it again
  • Simon Phipps is the new OSI President
  • Who Loves Ya, Linux Baby?
  • What does the Linux 3.4 kernel have to offer?
  • Moebius Adventure Game Confirmed for Linux
  • Xenonauts confirmed for Linux

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Unity Used By Super Heroes on TV Show
  • LibreOffice mentoring
  • First Unreal Engine 4 Screens
  • systemd for Administrators, Part XIII
  • Can This Computer Empower a New Generation of Programmers?
  • Mageia 2 and the default GNOME 3 desktop
  • Always on an activity, or all. You asked for it.
  • Sending mail from bash [Script]
  • Going Linux May 19: #173 Computer America #50

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • X.Org: "A Wasteland of Unreviewedness"
  • Kindergarden Linux
  • Tips for Linux Beginners
  • The road to KDE LightDM-0.2
  • Unity3D is Already Working on a Linux Port
  • Musings on the linux audio stack
  • $200 USB Stick Size Ubuntu PC 'Cotton Candy' Starts Shipping in May
  • If it's a Linux flaw, your phone is directly threatened
  • openSUSE in Education, Spreading Continue
  • Make Ubuntu top panel transparent
  • RescueTime for Linux (beta)
  • Browse your activities
  • Parted Magic gets optional firewall
  • cups-1.6 will be loads of fun
  • Add Screensavers to Ubuntu 12.04

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Pixar's Toy Story 2 Was Nearly Lost Because Of A Linux Command
  • US Supremes hammer final nail into Psystar coffin
  • 125,000 Ubuntu PCs to land in Pakistani students' laps
  • Wil Wheaton: ‘Yo Hollywood, Let Me Download Ubuntu’
  • Fedora To Remain Monogamist Towards GCC
  • What's going on with Krita since 2.4 got released?
  • Open Source Startup Inktank Sets Gaze On Ubuntu Server
  • Linux Outlaws 265 - It Doesn't Affect Your Ball Control

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Debian Edu interview: Jürgen Leibner
  • LibreOffice - Enhance desktop productivity
  • Linux Setup - Scott Merrill, Systems Engineer/Tech Writer
  • Open source software: It’s more than just free stuff
  • Ubuntu Developer Summit 12.10 Recap
  • Linux Wins - Or Does It?
  • Linux 3.4 approaching with "calmed" RC7
  • Is Mozilla Punting on Web Apps for Linux?
  • Going Linux #172 Linux Applications-Introduction

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Mozilla Makes Firefox 13 Super Speedy
  • Open source suites go beyond Microsoft Office
  • Nvidia contributes CUDA compiler to open source
  • Something to Watch With Red Hat
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