Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

News

recent leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux 'internet of things' gizmo ships
  • Ex-Googler Fears Google's Greed, Protects People From It
  • Dell Linux Engineers work over 5000 bugs with Red Hat
  • Enea adds Linux to OS offering
  • ‘Moniz’ gets a logo
  • TACC Releases Open Source Display Tiling Package
  • HP says it will commit to Linux as market share rises
  • Linux 3.4 will support GeForce GTX 680 and Southern Islands GPUs
  • Why Linux Needs Malware Protection
  • Android Apps in Linux Changes Everything
  • PCLinuxOS Magazine Openbox Special Edition

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Five easy-to-use Linux encryption tools
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 "Kepler" On Linux? (on Windows)
  • Nouveau Project Has Huge Surprises Today
  • gnome 3 got my goat
  • Reality Check on Ubuntu's Enterprise Claims
  • Kernel Log: Drivers for new Radeon GPUs
  • Master Linux Now! 2012 - On Sale Now
  • 2012 Will be The Year of The GNU/Linux Desktop
  • Commodore outs Linux-running Amiga Mini desktop
  • Carla Schroder: Whoever controls technology controls society
  • Getting the integrated fingerprint reader on my laptop to work in Linux
  • Kubuntu and the state of free consumer software
  • LibreOffice 3.4.6 Released
  • Ubuntu 12.04 Development update
  • Xubuntu 12.04 Beta Screenshots
  • Bodhi Linux 1.4.0 Released
  • Drupal Open Source is Built on Passion (and soon Symfony)
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 447

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Puzzle Game 'Me And My Shadow' Is Quite Challenging
  • Dear Esther: A Source Engine Game On Linux
  • Talk Of GCC 5.0 To Be Modular, More Like LLVM
  • Simply Linux improves and polishes
  • Whoops, There's A Big Problem For Wayland GTK+
  • Distrowatch Top 20-somethings
  • GloboNote: A Sticky Notes Tool on Steroids
  • Linpus Lite Desktop 1.7 screen shot preview
  • My Dream Tablet Running GNU/Linux: The LINTAB
  • The Children of Linux
  • openSUSE 12.2 Milestone 2 Screenshot Tour
  • GNOME 2 vs. GNOME 3
  • A Linux Game That's Still Not Selling Well
  • 5 Ways To Make Linux Boot Faster
  • Dell Surveys Customers on GNU/Linux
  • Drupal's Plan for Open Source CMS Success
  • Interview: Richard Stallman
  • Bryan Hates Freedom | LAS | s21e01
  • Linux Outlaws 256 - The Beards are Coming!!!

few leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Kubuntu Active is Activated
  • Is Linux About to Take Off On Tablets?
  • Linux servers keep growing, Windows & Unix keep shrinking
  • Nvidia's Excellent Linux Adventure
  • Linux File System -- Analyzing Fsck Test Results

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Conspiracy in Linux – The Debian Underworld
  • PC-BSD Teams With DuckDuckGo to Provide Enhanced Web Searches
  • Fedora Linux 16: A Business Powerhouse, in Pictures
  • Linux kernel 3.3 delayed
  • Open Source Coopetition Fueled by LF Growth
  • debian contributions to the linux kernel
  • Get Your Linux Game On
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 256
  • openSUSE Stable Maintenance Process Now Fully Open
  • GIMP 2.7.5 (last test before GIMP 2.8) now available
  • Raspberry Pi retailers clarify shipping costs on $35 Linux computer
  • This week in Fedora 17: Test Days galore
  • Easily Create Your Own Distribution Using Ubuntu Builder
  • Using Gimp in George
  • Keep an Eye on Your GNU/Linux System with Glances
  • Fedora 17 New Security Feature part VIII - New SELinux Domains
  • Making Compiler, Disk Testing More Reproducible

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Fedora 17 New Security Feature part VII - thumbnail protection
  • Apache HTTP Server: New Features for Version 2.4
  • Tethered Shooting with digiKam
  • Unsettings- A graphical configuration tool for Unity
  • Linux Processes – Environment extern, environ, getenv, setenv
  • New, shiny, Unity 5.6 released!
  • SANE crashy crashy
  • Spotify for Linux Preview Gets Small Bug Fix Update
  • How Drupal combines open source, openness, and security
  • Virtualization Software For Ubuntu Linux
  • Dress Up Bash Script with YAD
  • configure mutt for gmail
  • Several Countries Have Triple-Digit Growth for GNU/Linux
  • Linux Outlaws 255 - Brian Blessed’s BeardBerry

some more leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Why Enterprise Linux?
  • What Does One Serve With Raspberry Pi?
  • Desktop Freezes in 4.8.x
  • Yet another Linux story
  • Deepin-Scrot – Lightweight Screenshot Capture Program in Ubuntu
  • FOSS v proprietary software: image editing
  • Linux Mint 12 LXDE released
  • Debian Edu interview: Nigel Barker
  • The Linux Setup - Keith Milner, Telecom Engineer
  • The Best Disk Cloning App for Linux
  • The Linux 3.3 Kernel Is Not Yet Ready
  • The 2.6.32 Linux kernel
  • Got Privacy? Ubuntu Linux 12.04 Will Help Ensure It.
  • Ubuntu 12.04 .ISO Will Remain CD Sized
  • Richard Stallman | GNU/LAS | s20e10

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Coming Soon: A 3D Printable Case for Raspberry Pi
  • Linux in Saigon :-)
  • IBM streams Linux and Windows desktop through USB stick
  • Improving Hardware Support in Ubuntu
  • Exclusive Interview With Mark Shuttleworth
  • Ubuntu Unleashed 2012 Edition Review
  • Fedora 17 new features
  • Rest in peace, daemon.
  • How to convert a Wheezy (or newer) system to btrfs
  • A Look At 3D Native Client Games Coming To Linux This Year
  • GIMP: Free, Open Source Photo Editing Software
  • The Linux Setup, Noah Lorang, 37signals
  • KDE 3 got upower support and more in openSUSE 12.1
  • Linux Outlaws 254 - Croatian Jaffa Cakes
  • System76 Big Rig | LAS | s20e09
  • FLOSS Weekly 203

recent leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • A Quick Look at SliTaz 4 RC1
  • Gnome Boxes – Manage & Access Remote or Virtual Systems
  • Firefox 10 review
  • How to know if your computer license should be revoked
  • 4 new beautiful conky configs on Gnome
  • WURFL: a cautionary tale
  • Hack and / - Forensics with Ext4
  • Telling the Time on Linux: It’s Harder Than It Looks
  • Setup Network Interfaces in Debian
  • Where are they now?
  • Which Browser Should You Use?
  • The Completely Blank Xfce Desktop
  • Logitech HD Webcam C310 On Linux Mint
  • Build your own Linux based graphics workstation
  • Installing the Takeoff Launcher in KDE 4.8.0
  • How to Use Fdisk to Manage Partitions on Linux
  • New ‘HTTPS Everywhere’ Web browser extension released
  • Linux Outlaws 253 - Goatse Easter Egg

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Spark pre-orders closed!
  • openSUSE 12.1 update repository changes
  • Using Bash To Solve A Brain Teaser
  • Hands On With Incursion
  • Will KDE drop support for older graphics chips?
  • Take Control Of Your Power Usage With Gnome Power Statistics
  • What Greg Does
  • aseigo: next steps
  • Mozilla releases Firefox 10.0.2 update
  • What's new in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.8
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 to 5.8 Risk Report
  • Who couldn’t use a little more screen space?
  • Remove Recent History Lists In Ubuntu 11.10
  • Living with Statistics
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.