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News

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Interview with Jonathan Prior of Gameolith.com
  • Keep Your Data In Sync With DropBox For Linux
  • Use Giver to share files in a local network environment
  • Intel Thunderbolt Support Under Linux
  • Setting up a PPTP VPN in Linux
  • MP3 in Fedora 15
  • LinuxCon: Open Source is an Ecosystem, not a Zero Sum Game
  • Ubuntu tweaks Unity UI, adds ARM for servers
  • Bradley M. Kuhn: Desktop Summit 2011
  • Amavisd and SELinux
  • Big Blue Tweaks Red Hat Deal for Power Systems
  • Show Unity Launcher Using Top Left Corner Instead Of The Whole Left Edge
  • Happy Birthday Linux | LAS | s18e03

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Crossword Puzzle of Some Linux Distros...
  • Where's Wall●E?
  • The Friendly Black Screen that Talks (Espeak)
  • PlayOnLinux 4.0 Is Released 64-bit supported
  • infinite pool of great wallpapers
  • Fedora 15 KDE - How to upgrade to KDE 4.7
  • TeeWorlds Multiplayer Shooting Game Running On Linux | 0.6.1
  • Twinkle – KDE Soft-phone using the SIP protocol
  • Indie Game 'No Time To Explain' Released for Linux
  • Fix your icons package
  • 10 Good Inkscape Tutorials for Vector Graphic Designers
  • Anaconda Runtime for Clickteams Multimedia Fusion
  • How to make USB modem work on Arch Linux
  • Command Line | Change The Owner Of Files And Folders | chown
  • plasma active on opengl es
  • Linux Outlaws 224 - OggCamp 11 Live
  • LinuxCrazy Podcast 91 Interview with JD Horelick

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KWin turns 12
  • Wireless sharing with Plasma NM 0.9 (part 2)
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 14th August
  • "F" as in freedom, and in fun, and in the future
  • Jumping between operating systems
  • OpenELEC, a media center based on XBMC
  • Over 20% of new active domains run WordPress
  • How a Linux Distribution Review Should be Done
  • openSUSE-LXDE logo contest starting now
  • Behold The Power Cog [Minor Oneiric update alert]
  • How system update can break love
  • Full Circle Podcast 23: OGGCamp Part One
  • Marples-black – gtk2/3 dark style themes for Gnome
  • Future of Python programming language on a Linux platform
  • Thoughts about Network Trancparency
  • Dirk 2 Testers needed
  • National meet on Free Open Source Software
  • Revisited: openSUSE 11.4 GNOME
  • Yes, GNU/Linux is on Desktops and Notebooks and

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Dead Cyborg Brings Excitement, At First
  • Asylum
  • Trine 2 New Co-op Trailer
  • Introducing Cobalt
  • Why 2011 Is The Year Of Open Source
  • Remote Wayland Server Project: Does It Work Yet?
  • Linux Mint Debian 201108 RC (Gnome and Xfce) released
  • San Diego open-source software makers meet up and geek out
  • Linux and multi-form factor platforms
  • Will Nokia Ever Realize Open Source Is Not a Panacea?
  • SFLC Co-Hosts The Community Distribution Patent Policy FAQ with Debian
  • maddog: Not-So-Angry Birds Need to Flock Together
  • Beginner’s Guide to Shell Scripting 4: Conditions & If-Then Statements
  • Android GPLv2 termination worries: one more reason to upgrade to GPLv3
  • Copenhagen hospitals use LibreOffice
  • NVIDIA Releases 285.03 Beta Linux Driver
  • Red Hat CEO thinks the desktop is becoming a legacy application
  • Zentyal The Linux Small Business Server
  • Linux Outlaws 223 - Did You Say Orgy?
  • Aug 16: #147 Computer America #41
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 3 Episode 16

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Most Popular Open Source Platform Isn’t
  • Ubuntu Wallpaper Update
  • 4 way to administer Linux with a web interface
  • The Community of One
  • Photobomb released
  • SPDX spec standardizes open source compliance reporting
  • FLOSS Weekly 178: Synergy
  • Blender at Siggraph 2011
  • Linux Journal's Reader's Choice Awards 2011
  • Linux Wallpaper App ‘Wallch’ Adds Unity Support
  • Telepath RPG: Servants of God Released
  • OggCamp11 – Fear & Loathing In Farnham
  • 245 Desktop Summit Attendee Names to Find
  • openSUSE Conference 2011 Schedule Available
  • Review: Linux Mint 11 "Katya" LXDE
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 416

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Linux 3.1 Kernel Supports Wake On Wireless LAN
  • Five reasons why the PC is not dead
  • stat Command
  • Open Source Reality Check
  • Research identifies benefits of the open source software market
  • SFLC Oggcast: Legal Basics for Developers
  • Longterm kernel proposal signals ongoing Linux growth
  • Hacker Evolution Duality Released !
  • In a tough job market, your open source experience may be an asset in more ways than one
  • Non-profit Group Releases Open Source Mesh WiFi Network Software
  • Why Intel & Canonical Should Make A Deal for Ubuntu MeeGo
  • HowTo: run Flickering Lights on Linux
  • All Your BASH Are Belong To Us
  • Seven Points About Ereaders You Should Know Before Buying
  • No Time to Explain Soon
  • Interview: Kate Stewart, Ubuntu Release Manager at Canonical
  • Survivors of Ragnarök, New Linux Game Inspired by Dwarf Fortress

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Open Surface vs Open Core
  • Has Microsoft defeated Linux?
  • Building a personal data locker
  • 16 Cool Linux Commands
  • KDE release team changes
  • Mozilla Readies Its New Public License
  • PCManFM-Mod To Be In Parted Magic 6.7
  • Peter Brown and Stormy Peters Directors of Software Freedom Conservancy
  • Lots of stable kernel updates
  • Dead Cyborg Ep 1 Linux download
  • Future of the -longterm kernel releases
  • Programmer's Life: The Freelance
  • Romanian Unreasonableness
  • Opera Mini vs Opera Mobile: What’s The Difference?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Big distributions, little RAM 3
  • Getting Work Done | LAS | s18e02
  • HowTo: Microkorg XL Sound Editor on Linux
  • Dragon Player – KDE Video player focus on simplicity
  • Disastrous inventions: they said it would never work... and they were right
  • Help Fund “In The Dark”
  • Wireless on Plasma Active MeeGo image
  • Easy Ubuntu 64bit DLNA Server Setup + Bonus MKV Converter Script
  • Cnotify, get notifications for console events
  • Linux 3.1-rc2 Is A Fairly Calm Release
  • OpenSuSE 11.4 KDE: Where Desktop Environment Matters
  • Solving the Sunday Puzzle with coreutils
  • Setting up a new project – 4 tools you can’t miss the first time around

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Installing sSMTP MTA (Mail Transfer Agent)
  • Manage & Compare Fonts Easily With Font Manager
  • Custom Lookit panel icon to match Faenza icon set
  • Easily Share Files between Linux Machines using sFTP
  • 6 ways to map your mind with Linux
  • Ubo Iconset : Ballpoint pen made, Handmade Iconset for Ubuntu
  • Comprehensive Unity guide ready
  • Firefox 6 breaks out ahead of schedule, gets official August 16th
  • Hacker Evolution Duality - Free playable beta available
  • Free Software and homeschooling: reports from the trenches
  • No one cares about license agreements
  • Ubuntu Gnome Wallpapers
  • We have C++11
  • Jenkins for Ubuntu Oneiric: Call for Testing
  • Apt-gentoo? Gentoo-apt! Hah!
  • Redhat 5.1 Redneck Internationalization
  • String freeze for GNOME 3.2 in 3 weeks
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 7th August
  • Linux Q&A ; Why I Play for Both Teams
  • Windys 1.5.0 Released

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Ultimate Edition 3.0 "Gamers" Released
  • Installing Linux on a 386 laptop
  • Superdrug takes out common cold, other viruses
  • awesome Linux cheat sheet
  • Cardinal Quest
  • How eBay Leveraged Open Source to Streamline Transaction Processing
  • I installed sabayon 6 what now?
  • High-calibre ebook management
  • Software RAID in Linux – a small tutorial
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More in Tux Machines

15 ways to empower students with open source tools

Recently I read the fascinating book Empower: What Happens When Students Own Their Own Learning, by John Spencer and A.J. Juliani. The book led me to think more deeply about my teaching methods and how I like to learn. I think learning should be exciting, and I'm happiest when I'm actively engaged in what I'm doing. Why wouldn't students in our schools want anything different than that? And why aren't we doing more to give that experience to them? While many schools today have a 1:1 ratio of computers/tablets to students, most of them use platforms and software that allow little (if any) modification. Students can't tinker with the software or hardware. Yet tinkering and experimenting are at the heart of learning. The authors of Empower say that students in environments that foster "making" take ownership of their learning more readily and tend to be deeper thinkers who are more at home with frustration. Ultimately, they wrote, "makers are better equipped for life." Read more

Red Hat Upgrade and Insider Selling

OSS: Yandex, The Open Source Way, Machine Learning, and BSD

  • In Other API Economy News: Yandex Open Source Machine Learning Library and More
    We start your weekend off with a review of the stories we couldn’t cover with a look at what what going on in the world of APIs. We start off with news that Yandex, the Russian search engine company, has announced that they are open-sourcing CatBoost, a machine learning library. The library is based on gradient boosting, a machine learning technique described by TechCrunch as being “designed to help “teach” systems when you have a very sparse amount of data, and especially when the data may not all be sensorial (such as audio, text or imagery), but includes transactional or historical data, too.” Yandex is freely releasing CatBoost for anyone to use under an Apache License. This move is similar to what we saw from Google when they open sourced TensorFlow in late 2015. As the demand for artificial intelligence solutions backed by machine learning platforms continues to grow, moves like this serve to help a wide range of developers take advantage of the technology.
  • CatBoost: Yandex's machine learning algorithm is available free of charge
  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community. Additionally, as organizations, especially government, continue to emerge from the technology funding embargo of the Great (2008) Recession - an economic force that froze IT purchases and programs and forced many into strict “keep the lights on” operational mode, IT managers and CIO’s are carefully expending their still relatively measly budgets. [...] For IT organizations, especially government, with limited budgets and long procurement processes, time and increased experience with open source products will lead to a growing understanding and acceptance. And as this understanding progresses and becomes more accepted, open source will become a “go to” option to keep up with the fast moving technical environment, and perhaps eventually, as a standard first option, realizing the broader set of open source values by relying on the collective work and minds of a virtual community of IT “hackers”, “geeks” and “nerds”, working globally, 24x7/365 to explore, develop and showcase whatever tech that sparks their individual interest.
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    BSDTW 2017 will be held on the 11th and 12th of November 2017 (Sat/Sun), in Taipei. We are now requesting proposals for talks. We do not require academic or formal papers. If you wish to submit a formal paper, you are welcome to, but it is not required.

    The talks should be written with strong technical content. Presentations on the use of BSD in products and companies are strongly encouraged but marketing proposals are not appropriate for this venue.

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  • GNOME's Mutter Window Manager Now Supports Tablet Wheel Events on Wayland
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  • Terminus: A Great Modern And Highly Cutomizable Terminal For Linux
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