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News

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Red Hat reveals that RHEL 6.2 will support AMD's Bulldozer power saving features
  • LibreOffice Easy Hacks Rotation
  • single-sign-on on openSUSE / KDE4, or the three faces of the community
  • Wiki in a Jiffy with LionWiki
  • Almost that time of year...
  • Linux Outlaws 237 - You Need Classical Training for This
  • A New MMORPG On The Linux-Friendly Unigine
  • “The New Linux Distros Edition” of Dr. Bill.TV Netcast #214
  • Linux Mint: Standing Out In a Crowd (Review & Screenshots)
  • ArchBang 2011 Review
  • The Top 100 Things I'd Do If I Ever Became An Evil Overlord
  • Fedora 16 Review | LAS | s19e05
  • Get an Early Taste of Linux Mint 12
  • Lenovo Multimedia Remote N5901
  • Taking oVirt for a Spin
  • Run today's GNU!
  • The Coming Fascist Internet
  • Kororaa 14 no longer supported
  • The Linux Foundation Announces Program for Automotive Linux Summit

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Akonadi misconception #1: where is my data?
  • Fedora 16 Wipe Other Systems from GRUB2 - A Fix
  • Mulawa Dreaming Easy Comes to Linux
  • Sabayon developers split the Portage sabayon overlay into two
  • Disk Encryption in Fedora 16
  • Nvidia Optimus with Ironhide
  • kmail “Failed to fetch the resource collection”
  • OpenOffice.org: Five Months of Incubation at ASF
  • A Disappointing Review of #! 10 "Statler"
  • Juggling Debian Sid and Fedora 16
  • Diaspora Co-Founder Ilya Zhitomirskiy Dead
  • Hostile Takeover: New Linux Game
  • X.Org, Wayland, Open Gaming At FOSDEM 2012
  • Remembering the promise of FLOSS
  • Recovering Linux file permissions
  • make dmesg timestamp human readable
  • Westford encourages Red Hat to stay

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Speeding up KDM
  • A look at the state of HTML5 parsing and the Opera 11.60 beta
  • How to customize Chakra 2011.11
  • A Guide to the KDE Notification System
  • Dual Boot Windows 7 and Fedora 16 Verne
  • LibreOffice at Free Software Conference 2011, Budapest
  • Vim tip: Finding differences without separate files
  • Sugar Labs Releases Sugar on a Stick v6 (Pineapple)
  • What is your favorite browser's best feature?
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.11.11
  • Last Four FaiF Episodes
  • Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Enable Alt+F2 Run Command Prompt
  • Work (not) done
  • Launch Your Applications In Style Using GNOME Pie
  • Entitlement? No. Sharing? Yes.
  • Can Open Source Help End "Security Poverty"?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • LinuxMint 12 Lisa first Look | Screenshots Tour
  • A Proper Solution To The Linux ASPM Problem
  • Sabayon Releases Even More Choice
  • openSUSE 12.1 – coming soon
  • Red Hat Co-Founder to Battle Amazon
  • Court Upholds the GPL
  • GPL violations in Android: Same arguments, different day
  • Stupid Fedora tricks
  • Pardus Corporate 2 Kurumsal - quick, powerful, rogue
  • First Day at LinuxCon EMEA 2011
  • Kororaa 16 Beta on the way
  • FileTea now available in Debian
  • Opera 11.60 (Tunny) Beta
  • Continuous Integration testing for openSUSE available
  • AMD decTOP running Debian Squeeze
  • What’s in a name? The meaning behind Kororaa
  • Fedora Package categories… what do you think?
  • Mozilla Reinvents Web Video With Popcorn 1.0
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 428

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Linux, Open Source Still 'Money' in Financial Services
  • Open-source Proponents Blast Proprietary Software in Dutch Schools
  • How MonoGame Can Bring More Games to Linux
  • Is Desktop Linux Dead? | LAS | s19e04
  • Desura Linux client available to anyone
  • LinuxDay 2011 Italy celebrates 20 years of Linux
  • HTC and LG join patent pools, try to protect Linux
  • CentOS Continuous Release
  • Catnip Kernel Panic
  • The Darknet Project: netroots activists dream of global mesh network
  • Some interesting statistic about user experience with the applications icons on the desktop
  • Interview - TheFu, Enterprise Architect/Writer
  • Believe It Or Not: SCO Moves to Partly Reopen SCO v. IBM
  • Blue Libra and Thunder Fleets released for Linux
  • Simple Way to Run Programs As Root in Ubuntu
  • FLOSS Weekly 190
  • What the Perl 5 Compiler Modules Could Have Been
  • Compiling Open Grid Engine 2011.11 on Ubuntu 11.04
  • Linux Format Stickers & Stuff
  • Btrfs Brings "Pretty Beefy" Changes In Linux 3.2
  • Linux Outlaws 236 - The Right to Bear GNU
  • Going Linux Nov 05: #155 Listener Feedback
  • Support Linux by Not Writing Linux-Only Software
  • Desura Client
  • Plans to remove Kororaa 14 from mirrors

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Understanding the current state of UEFI
  • Mark is right, and Mark is wrong
  • Kubuntu Desktop Effects
  • Kademar 4.9.5 - two-faced surprise from Spain
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 3 Episode 21
  • Start Active
  • Handling timezones in python
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 170: Set the Presets!
  • In Conversation: Jim Zemlin of the Linux Foundation
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 427
  • Debian Squeeze on Asus Eee PC 1215B
  • AMD FirePro V4900
  • FLOSS Weekly 189
  • Looking back: LibreOffice Conference in Paris
  • Bye Bye Bodhi
  • Rodent - Advanced User file manager for Linux systems

leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux Hybrid Graphics Will Be A Mess For A While
  • Peek into Pinguy OS 11.10 Shell Edition
  • Linux Experiment: Gentoo (A.K.A. "Compiling")
  • Fedora 16 beta
  • Arch Made Easy | LAS | s19e03
  • What's Popular In The Linux World This Year
  • Mumbo Jumbo Games Land in Ubuntu Software Centre
  • A Word on Productivity and Linux...
  • 'Mega Games Pack' Lets You Install and Play Hundreds of Free Games on Ubuntu
  • Fedora 16 Release Candidate 1 Arrives Late
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 23rd October
  • Status Quo On The Foundation, October 2011
  • Gedit – Dash
  • Popular Linux Video Transcoder Gets Updated
  • Why We Moved Off The Cloud
  • Document Foundation Board 2011: Final Results
  • Linux Outlaws 235 - Unleash the Ball Clamp!
  • Disable Lock Screen After Suspend in Ubuntu 11.10

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • SalineOS 1.5
  • Complete Arch Linux Installation, Part 1: Install & Configure Arch
  • Gnome User Survey
  • The DRM Pull Request For Linux 3.2 Kernel
  • Debian joins Dropbox’s officially supported platforms
  • GNOME 3.3.1 Development Release
  • How to Get Wireless to Connect Automatically in Sabayon
  • Configuration Settings and Shortcuts in Ubuntu 11.10 - Efficiency Boosters
  • Great Open Source Projects That Don't Make the Headlines
  • Guake Terminal Emulator
  • Loop mount iso files without being root
  • The Comprehensive LAMP Guide—Part 3 (PHP)
  • CentOS 6 Channel Bonding
  • Linux-based payment device features NFC, color touchscreen
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.10.28
  • VMWare Player on Fedora 16
  • Virus Scanning on Linux
  • Feeding the trolls
  • Dialog Recording with Audacity and a USB Microphone
  • BIOS and Firmware Updates Using Dell Linux Repository
  • Nokia developing new Linux-based entry-level smartphones, say sources

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Ubuntu: the dreamy wildcat flexes its claws
  • The Survey That GNOME Would Rather Ignore
  • Will Microsoft Return to Unfair Practices with IE and Windows?
  • GCC 4.6.2 Compiler Released
  • Libguestfs 1.14 Rolls Out
  • How to change the Bodhi Linux wallpaper
  • Red Hat Stock Hits New 52-Week High
  • Discuss here... (openSUSE)
  • How To Move Unity Launcher To The Bottom Of The Screen
  • Third Day at OWF 2011
  • The State of Processes
  • Trash-cli : Manage Trash from Command line in Ubuntu Linux
  • How to update/upgrade Slackware packages from command line
  • How to install package by Slackbuild script on Slackware
  • Kubuntu Network Configuration
  • Introducing Inqlude, the Qt library archive
  • Annoying “unable to find a medium containing a live file system” in Ubuntu

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Alternatives to KDE and GNOME on Linux systems
  • Second day at OWF 2011
  • Open Source Clouds: Linux Distributions Choose Sides
  • Red Vs. Green: SUSE Backs OpenStack, Red Hat Stands Alone
  • Six Essential Drupal Modules for Business
  • FLOSS Weekly 188
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 426
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More in Tux Machines

Licensing: Facebook Responds to Licence Complaints, Cloud Native Open Source License Choices Analysed

  • Facebook relicenses several projects
    Facebook has announced that the React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js projects will be moving to the MIT license. This is, of course, a somewhat delayed reaction to the controversy over the "BSD+patent" license previously applied to those projects.
  • Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js
    Next week, we are going to relicense our open source projects React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license. We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons. This decision comes after several weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Although we still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to users of our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community.
  • Cloud Native Open Source License Choices
    One of the most common questions regarding open source licensing today concerns trajectories. Specifically, what are the current directions of travel both for specific licenses as well as license types more broadly. Or put more simply, what licenses are projects using today, and how is that changing? We’ve examined this data several times, most recently in this January look at the state of licensing based on Black Duck’s dataset. That data suggested major growth for permissive licenses, primarily at the expense of reciprocal alternatives. The Apache and MIT licenses, for example, were up 10% and 21% respectively, while the GPL was down 27%. All of this is on a relative share basis, of course: the “drop” doesn’t reflect relicensing of existing projects, but less usage relative to its peers. [...] One such community with enough of a sample size to be relevant is the one currently forming around the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Founded in 2015 with the Kubernetes project as its first asset, the Foundation has added eleven more open source projects, all of which are licensed under the same Apache 2 license. But as a successful Foundation is only a part of the broader ecosystem, the real question is what are the licensing preferences of the Cloud Native projects and products outside of the CNCF itself. [...] Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given the influence of the CNCF itself, Apache strongly outperforms all other licenses, showing far greater relative adoption than it has in more generalized datasets such as the Black Duck survey. Overall in this dataset, approximately 64% of projects are covered by the Apache license. No other project has greater than a 12% share. The only other licenses above 10%, in fact, are the GPL at 12% and MIT at 11%. After that, the other projects are all 5% or less.

today's howtos

Games: Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D., Arcan 0.5.3, Wine Staging 2.17

  • Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. from former Valve worker should hopefully come to Linux
    Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. [Steam] is a mod from former Valve worker Cayle George, it's a short prison escape and it should be coming to Linux. Mr George actually worked on Team Fortress 2 and Portal 2 during his time at Valve, but he's also worked for other notable developers on titles like Horizon Zero Dawn.
  • Game Engine Powered Arcan Display Server With Durden Desktop Updated
    Arcan, the open-source display server powered by a game engine, is out with a new release. Its Durden desktop environment has also been updated. Arcan is a display server built off "the corpse of a game engine" and also integrates a multimedia framework and offers behavior controls via Lua. Arcan has been in development for a half-decade while its original code traces back more than a decade, as explained previously and has continued advancing since.
  • Arcan 0.5.3, Durden 0.3
    It’s just about time for a new release of Arcan, and way past due for a new release of the reference desktop environment, Durden. Going through some of the visible changes on a ‘one-clip or screenshot per feature’ basis:
  • Razer plans to release a mobile gaming and entertainment device soon
    NVIDIA, another big player in the gaming hardware and lifestyle space, released an Android-based portable gaming and entertainment console called the NVIDIA Shield that emphasized in-home streaming, and the Ouya console that Razer acquired (and discontinued) ran Android. But Razer decided to use Windows instead of Android on the Edge.
  • Wine Staging 2.17 is out with more Direct3D11 features fixing issues in The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more
    Wine Staging 2.17 is another exciting release, which includes more Direct3D11 features which fixes issues with The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more. As a reminder, Wine Staging is the testing area for future Wine development released, which will eventually be made into stable Wine releases.

KDE: Plasma 5.11 in Kubuntu 17.10, Krita 3.3, Randa and Evolution of Plasma Mobile

  • KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Will Be Coming to Kubuntu 17.10 Soon After Its Release
    KDE kicked off the development of the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment a few months ago, and they've already published the Beta release, allowing users to get a first glimpse of what's coming in the final release next month. Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop team did a great job bringing the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment to the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and it looks like the Kubuntu team also want to rebase the official flavor on the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment.
  • Krita 3.3 Digital Painting App Promises Better HiDPI Support on Linux & Windows
    Work on the next Krita 3.x point release has started, and a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Krita 3.3 version is now ready for public testing, giving us a glimpse of what's coming in the new release. In the release announcement, Krita devs reveal the fact that they were forced to bump the version number from 3.2.x to 3.3.x because the upcoming Krita 3.3 release will be introducing some important changes for Windows platforms, such as support for the Windows 8 event API, thus supporting the n-trig pen in Surface laptops.
  • Randa-progress post-hoc
    So, back in Randa I was splitting my energies and attentions in many pieces. Some attention went to making pancakes and running the kitchen in the morning — which is stuff I take credit for, but it is really Grace, and Scarlett, and Thomas who did the heavy lifting, and Christian and Mario who make sure the whole thing can happen. And the attendees of the Randa meeting who pitch in for the dishes after lunch and dinner. The Randa meetings are more like a campground than a 5-star hotel, and we work together to make the experience enjoyable. So thanks to everyone who pitched in. Part of a good sprint is keeping the attendees healthy and attentive — otherwise those 16-hour hacking days really get to you, in spite of the fresh Swiss air. [...] You can read more of what the attendees in Randa achieved on planet KDE (e.g. kdenlive, snappy, kmymoney, marble, kube, Plasma mobile, kdepim, and kwin). I’d like to give a special shout out to Manuel, who taught me one gesture in Italian Sign Langauage — which is different from American or Dutch Sign Language, reminding me that there’s localization everywhere.
  • The Evolution of Plasma Mobile
    Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?