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News

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Nord: A beautiful glassy shell theme
  • GCC 4.6.1 Compiler Released
  • cpan2pkg: prettier gui, ready for mageia!
  • Imagination, now in HD
  • openSUSE strategy voting close to the finish line
  • Gluster Becomes Member of Open Virtualization Alliance
  • Gdiskdump - GUI for diskdump (dd)
  • DtO: Drastic Measures at Bust Buy
  • Geneva abandoning its open source email and office strategy
  • Interview with Keith Poole from Desura Part 1
  • Awoken Icon Set Ported to KDE, Looks Absolutely Beautiful
  • Open Framework Systems (OFS), a new strategic partner for Mandriva
  • 1 Million XOs Missing in Action, Lack of Measurements to Blame
  • Live stream of Debian uploads as well as Ubuntu bugs and uploads
  • Quake Turns 15; Carmack & Hollenshead Speak

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Burning Through Power: Linux Regressions Found
  • Why I Use Linux Ubuntu
  • Advances and Paradoxes of Computers
  • Wallpaper Slideshow App For Gnome 3 (Updated)
  • Pidgin 2.9.0 released (installation in Ubuntu)
  • Blackmagic Decklink SDI and Linux
  • Watching multimedia in Slackware’s browser
  • Video thumbnails in Thunar
  • Ubuntu Unity Concept with Android-esque Trash Icon Gesture
  • Meego/Harmattan – A willfully misunderstood platform.
  • Free or open source for students?
  • Linux Outlaws 214 - Das Router
  • Network Boot Mageia: PXE + NFS Root goodness
  • OIN-A patent pool to protect Linux users from lawsuits
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 19th June
  • Linux 3.0 Faster Than Linux 2.6
  • KDE 4 Service Menu Editor
  • Firefox Drops URL Prefix

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • The 10 worst-named tech products
  • LinuxQuestions.org Turns Eleven
  • Linux Format issue 147 is on sale now
  • What is that character called?
  • 3 network scanner for Linux
  • The Linux Setup - Jeff Hoogland, Bodhi Linux
  • GCC Compiler Migrating To Be More C++ Based
  • FUD Flows Freely Against FLOSS

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 23: Would You Like Some Wine?
  • WebGL is Fundamentally Flawed
  • Introducing the Compliance Lab's summer intern
  • Mageia: preview of ARM port is now available
  • Use a Mac to Turn a Windows Laptop Into a Linux Machine
  • Enterprise IT unhappy with Firefox 4's quick demise
  • Open Or Proprietary, It's Whether It Works Or Not That Counts
  • Out of the Park Baseball 12
  • Happy 15th Anniversary Quake!
  • BatteryMonitor supports NetBSD
  • BlueBubble: The Fine Manual
  • plasma active updates
  • Drupal Gets Social Software Facelift
  • Movie About Indie Game Developers
  • Video: GNOME 3 Shell (and Fedora 15)
  • Likewise Software Joins Open Virtualization Alliance

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 22: Spread Out and Get Comfortable
  • So much open source, so little time…
  • Opera Featherweight: First Phase
  • Drop Your Dropbox and SparkleShare Instead!
  • Who killed the netbook?
  • Apple Threatens Open Source Amahi Project with Legal Action
  • HTML5 in Sugar
  • What to do if you can’t do 60fps?
  • Xfce Design SIG launches
  • XFS Is Becoming Leaner While Btrfs & EXT4 Gain Weight
  • 3D Fantasy MMORPG 'PlaneShift' Updated
  • Windows Newlines Will Kill Your Linux Scripts
  • GNOME 3 extensions will get own website with one-click
  • The Linux Week in Review June 22, 2011
  • FLOSS Weekly 171: Software Freedom Conservancy

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Say Hello To XWayland & A New X.Org Video Driver
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 221
  • Ubuntu Hardware: Debugging Hard Problems
  • osc client in Gentoo
  • Welcome to Karen Sandler, New GNOME Foundation Executive Director
  • The Dark Side of Google Chrome
  • SFLC Oggcast: Karen's New Job; Supreme Court on Patents
  • BitTorrent - It's not just about copyright any more
  • Why Linux skills are a necessity on your resume
  • Notes from Red Hat Open Source Day 2011
  • Submit a digiKam Tip, Win a ZaReason Teo Pro Netbook
  • How GitHub Saved OpenSource
  • Mind-map of Document-centric Gnome
  • Linux and My Computers' Hardware
  • Piper Jaffray Reiterates Overweight On Red Hat

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Haiku OS Advances With New Official Release
  • PC-BSD: Devil With Human Face
  • 3 Cloud-based Linux Distributions Worth Trying
  • GCC 4.6.1 RC Arrives; Official Release Not Far Off
  • How can I be a KDE power user?
  • Xen Enters Mainline Kernel
  • Linux Foundation Releases New FOSS Compliance White Paper
  • Available: FreeBSD News website
  • Red Hat Bulls Shop for Calls
  • Bodhi Linux - Swag Store, Affiliates and Memberships
  • Linux ARM support: A hot mess, an ugly clean-up
  • Google Throws Its Weight Behind LibreOffice
  • All the Free Linux Documentation Resources You'll Ever Need
  • Chuckles are Where You Find Them
  • Mozilla to release Firefox version 5 today
  • Release logs are important!

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 19: Using 'man' and 'grep'
  • LC_CTYPE to default locale: No such file or directory
  • Add More power Options To GNOME User Menu
  • Correcting a Misaligned VGA Image on your Monitor or TV in Xorg
  • Magical Diary: Horse Hall Coming Soon
  • Installing a package through a Dolphin action
  • E-book management on Slackware
  • Gallium3D Clover Can Now Execute OpenCL Native Kernels
  • Online resource collection for Linux Administrators
  • To understand recursion...
  • 10 Must-Have Firefox Extensions

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 18: What Is This 'sudo' You Speak Of?
  • Unix date in Bash
  • My smart backup script
  • How to Remaster Ubuntu to Get a Customised Distribution
  • Told you so
  • Live CDs—My Wonder Wall
  • Wakanda is here
  • Fuduntu 14.10 - Now Available
  • Earnings Preview: Red Hat's Quarterly
  • Duck Duck Go Search Engine in Ubuntu’s Firefox?
  • Using KVM and VirtualBox side by side
  • LibreOffice Math Guide published
  • More SSH Port Forwarding
  • Mouse pointer highligher trail in GIMP
  • editing HD video: linux vs imovie
  • Install java browser plugin in Fedora 15

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Web Server Load Balancing with IPTables in Linux
  • ufw - Iptables under Ubuntu
  • Encrypting an Enterprise Desktop with TrueCrypt
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 12th June
  • FOFF – a lightweight graphical FTP client
  • Announcing Planet Debian Derivatives
  • Beware of KDE 4.6.4
  • Test Plan for Linux File System Fsck Testing
  • Puredyne: pure creativity
  • New round of Debian IRC Training Sessions
  • Sharing Ubuntu with the world
  • GNOME 3 install-fest took place in Beijing, too
  • Open Source Could Change the Future of E-Discovery
  • community proposed unity design
  • LexisNexis Joins Linux Foundation
  • One Laptop Per Child Infographic
  • Xen lets KVM overtake
  • More Linux Benchmarks Of The AMD A8-3500M Fusion APU
  • Firefox 5 RC Updates Version Number and Little Else
  • Counting PCs and Their OS
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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.