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News
  • Debian undecided on method for secure boot
  • More Linux!
  • systemd for Administrators, Part XVI
  • Text Mode for Fedora 18
  • Fedora: Some basic tips with Yum
  • Raspberry Pis Burned by Counterfeit Apple Chargers
  • Fedora 19 Might Be A Prime Rib Or Crop Circle
  • There's Still Interest In A Fedora Software Center
  • Fedora is retiring Smolt hardware census
  • The Performance Between GCC Optimization Levels
  • Linux Format 164 On Sale Today - Linux at CERN!

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  • Linux on ARM breakthrough to take away Torvalds' arse pain
  • A few thoughts on cloud computing
  • Linux Install Fest by the Numbers
  • 3D Space Combat Game 'Salvation Prophecy' Coming to Linux
  • LibreOffice Writer now supports first page header/footer
  • NoteCase Is Back in Pro Form - but There's a Hitch
  • Adobe Patches Flash Player in Masssive Security Update
  • How to Reset Unity in Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal

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  • Ubuntu 12.10 ‘Quantal Quetzal’: Beta 2 Sneak Peek
  • A Significant Release Of DragonFlyBSD Coming Up
  • KDE Pens Manifesto
  • 1366x768 not allowed in EDID block. You need modeline. Here's how.
  • Simple trick that lets you code twice as fast
  • Ubuntu's Shopping Lens Might Be Illegal in Europe
  • Jim Whitehurst's big idea: Effective leaders must operate as catalysts
  • Major Unvanquished update (Alpha 8)
  • First openSUSE Conference Sneak Peek
  • Password Tools: Creating secure passwords and testing their quality
  • Four Games to Increase Your Vocabulary and General Knowledge
  • Tuxradar Open Ballot: What can Linux really steal from Apple?
  • Keep Your Desktop Fresh with Variety Wallpaper Changer

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  • Two Slackware Derivatives Still Alive
  • Scratch, a programming language for kids
  • Solus Eveline 1.2: good for newbies
  • Work at Linux Format!
  • Linux 3.8 Kernel May Have Better Nouveau Re-Clocking
  • KDE's KWin Gears Up To Advance At Faster Pace
  • Rekonq 2 Web Browser Enters Development For KDE
  • Build a file server with the Raspberry Pi
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.8.0: The Apps Generation
  • Watch HDTV from Internet on your TV with Linux PC (Legally)
  • KLook from File->Open/Save dialogs Added
  • KWin maintainer to join Blue Systems
  • Top Three Unix Tools
  • Compete In Rigs Of Rods Multiplayer!
  • How To Boot (Embedded) Linux In Under One Second
  • One Linux for all ARM systems
  • Cinnarch – Where Arch Meets Cinnamon
  • Let your creativity explode with MyPaint!
  • OpenShot Founder Interview | LAS | s23e10

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  • Replace Lilo Splash with Mayan Slackware 14.0
  • The Linux Setup - Terry Hancock, Journalist/Producer
  • The Staging Pull Goes In For Linux 3.7 Kernel
  • Linux on the Desktop Dead? More Alive then Never - 750 Desktops at Portugal
  • Open source equals software freedom, not free software
  • Every detail matters – Round 2
  • FLOSS Weekly 228
  • Going Linux Oct 5 #186
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 473

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  • The history of OpenOffice shows why licensing matters
  • Linux certificate program launches in North America
  • Bacon: The Canonical Community Team and 13.04
  • Publish a book with LyX
  • The Open Hardware Summit: The Future of Manufacturing is Sharing
  • Using wview to monitor the weather on your own weather station
  • Millikin University Does its Homework
  • Firefox quit warning message bug
  • The Fox in the FOSS Henhouse
  • Change GRUB Splash Image, Background, Font Color on Your Linux

today's leftovers:

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  • Fuduntu Gets New Release
  • What's holding back mainstream Drupal adoption?
  • The shocking OpenSuSE 12.2 KDE, plus an unexpected surprise
  • Debian relicenses its logo
  • GNOME: Firefox extensions and wider availability
  • Vim: The Hidden Power of Customization
  • Features vs. Benefits
  • ProjectLibre: October 2012 Project of the Month
  • PC-BSD 9.1 Review | LAS | s23e09
  • Microsoft will be saved by open-source
  • S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Clear Sky - Late Verdict
  • New Security Feature in Fedora 18 Part 2:

today's leftovers:

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  • wattOS R6 Review – Go green with Linux
  • Deli(cate) Linux
  • 'Hostile Takeover' Alpha Released for Linux
  • Steam for Linux a Bad Idea? - This Week in Linux Gaming (video)

today's leftovers:

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HowTos
  • What to Expect from Steam on Linux
  • out of disk storage space, but there is still free space!!
  • How Does Linux Inspire? (video)
  • Top Business Intelligence Software for Linux
  • RKHunter: checking for Root Kits and Intrusions on Linux
  • nvidia cards on gentoo
  • CrossOver - Will you make me convert?
  • Gnome 3.8 Features: Integrated Application Search
  • Who needs GLX? KWin doesn't

some leftovers:

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HowTos
  • How to install .tar.gz and other tarball files in Linux
  • Getting rid of a Dropbox error message
  • Infor gets into bed with Red Hat
  • Display Management in KDE
  • Setting up MySQL on Sabayon Linux
  • View Your Raspberry Pi's Stats with the Raspberry Pi Sysinfo Script
  • KDE Plasma Does Gestures Globally
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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, GrayKey, Google and Cilium

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Hackers Leaked The Code Of iPhone Cracking Device “GrayKey”, Attempted Extortion
    The mysterious piece of hardware GrayKey might give a sense of happiness to cops because they can get inside most of the iPhone models currently active, including the iPhone X. The $30,000 device is known to crack a 4-digit iPhone passcode in a matter of a few hours, and a six-digit passcode in 3 days, or possibly 11 hours in ideal scenarios. That’s why security experts suggest that iOS users should keep an alphanumeric passcode instead of an all-number passcode.
  • Someone Is Trying to Extort iPhone Crackers GrayShift With Leaked Code
    Law enforcement agencies across the country are buying or have expressed interest in buying GrayKey, a device that can unlock up-to-date iPhones. But Grayshift, the company that makes the device, has attracted some other attention as well. Last week, an unknown party quietly leaked portions of GrayKey code onto the internet, and demanded over $15,000 from Grayshift—ironically, the price of an entry-level GrayKey—in order to stop publishing the material. The code itself does not appear to be particularly sensitive, but Grayshift confirmed to Motherboard the brief data leak that led to the extortion attempt.
  • It's not you, it's Big G: Sneaky spammers slip strangers spoofed spam, swamp Gmail sent files
    Google has confirmed spammers can not only send out spoofed emails that appear to have been sent by Gmail users, but said messages also appear in those users' sent mail folders. The Chocolate Factory on Monday told The Register that someone has indeed created and sent spam with forged email headers. These not only override the send address, so that it appears a legit Gmail user sent the message, but it also mysteriously shows up in that person's sent box as if they had typed it and emitted themselves. In turn, the messages would also appear in their inboxes as sent mail.
  • Cilium 1.0 Advances Container Networking With Improved Security
    For last two decades, the IPtables technology has been the cornerstone of Linux networking implementations, including new container models. On April 24, the open-source Cilium 1.0 release was launched, providing a new alternative to IPtables by using BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter), which improves both networking and security. The Cilium project's GitHub code repository defines the effort as Linux Native, HTTP Aware Network Security for Containers. Cilium development has been driven to date by stealth startup Covalent, which is led by CEO Dan Wendlandt, who well-known in the networking community for his work at VMware on software-defined networking, and CTO Thomas Graf, who is a core Linux kernel networking developer.

Applications: KStars, Kurly, Pamac, QEMU

  • KStars 2.9.5 is out!
    Autofocus module users would be happy to learn that the HFR value is now responsive to changing seeing conditions. Previously, the first successful autofocus operation would set the HFR Threshold value of which subsequent measurements are compared against during the in-sequence-focusing step.
  • Kurly – An Alternative to Most Widely Used Curl Program
    Kurly is a free open source, simple but effective, cross-platform alternative to the popular curl command-line tool. It is written in Go programming language and works in the same way as curl but only aims to offer common usage options and procedures, with emphasis on the HTTP(S) operations. In this tutorial we will learn how to install and use kurly program – an alternative to most widely used curl command in Linux.
  • Pamac – Easily Install and Manage Software on Arch Linux
    Arch Linux is one of the most popular Linux distribution available despite its apparent technicality. Its default package manager pacman is powerful but as time always tells, it is a lot easier to get certain things done using a mouse because GUI apps barely require any typing nor do they require you to remember any commands; and this is where Pamac comes in. Pamac is a Gtk3 frontend for libalpm and it is the GUI tool that Arch Linux users turn to the most when they aren’t in the mood to manage their software packages via the terminal; and who can blame them? It was specifically created to be used with Pacman.
  • QEMU 2.12 Released With RISC-V, Spectre/Meltdown & Intel vGPU Action
    QEMU 2.12 is now officially available as the latest stable feature update to this important component to the open-source Linux virtualization stack.

Ubuntu Leftovers

today's howtos