OS

Various bits of news about operating systems

The future of realtime Linux in doubt

Filed under
Linux

In a message about the release of the 3.14.10-rt7 realtime Linux kernel, Thomas Gleixner reiterated that the funding problems that have plagued realtime Linux (which he raised, again, at last year's Real Time Linux Workshop) have only gotten worse.

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Linux Kernel 3.4.98 LTS Brings Updated Wireless Drivers and Better PowerPC Support

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Linux

Linux kernel 3.4.98 LTS is here to introduce better support for the PowerPC (PPC) computer architecture, several updated wireless, Radeon, ACPI, SCSI, and USB drivers, improvements to the CIFS and NFS filesystems, as well as networking enhancements, especially for Bluetooth and Wireless.

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CentOS 7 GNOME Live CD Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Now that the CentOS 7 Linux kernel-based operating system has been officially released, the time has come to enjoy some screenshots of this beautiful distribution of Linux based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

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DESKTOP CONTAINERS – THE WAY FORWARD

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

One feature we are spending quite a bit of effort in around the Workstation is container technologies for the desktop. This has been on the wishlist for quite some time and luckily the pieces for it are now coming together. Thanks to strong collaboration between Red Hat and Docker we have a great baseline to start from. One of the core members of the desktop engineering team, Alex Larsson, has been leading the Docker integration effort inside Red Hat and we are now preparing to build onwards on that work, using the desktop container roadmap created by Lennary Poettering.

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Linux Kernel 3.10.48 LTS Improves Support for Radeon GPUs

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Linux

The 48th maintenance release of the Linux 3.10 kernel was officially announced last night, July 9, by Greg Kroah-Hartman. This build comes along with the Linux kernels 3.4.98 LTS, 3.14.12 LTS, and 3.15.5, for which we have separate announcements on Softpedia.

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Tech-Friendly: Bring new life to an old PC with Linux Mint

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Mint (Xfce) has a simple interface and is pretty perky, even on old computers. The installer will install Firefox, the LibreOffice office suite, and a variety of programs for managing e-mail, videos and music; perfect for a backup Internet surfing and word processing computer. The installer will ask if you want to install third-party utilities — choose “yes” for compatibility with websites that use Adobe Flash and other multimedia software. Depending on your computer, the installation should complete in fewer than 30 minutes.

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No, Linux is not dead on the desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I hate having to wade through these kinds of articles, but it's necessary to answer them lest the perception take root that "Linux is doomed!" and all the usual blather that goes along with such nonsense. Every single time I read one of these articles my eyes roll into the back of my head and various profanities burst from my lips.

The article focuses on the corporate desktop, but as we all know there has been a revolution going on inside companies as people move their focus from desktop computers to mobile devices. And Linux has been a part of that via Android and Chrome OS since the very beginning. And let's not forget that we'll soon have phones and tablets coming from Canonical that run Ubuntu.

The author acknowledges the transition to mobile, but then downplays it and focuses back on Windows on the desktop. Well, if Windows is still the main OS being used on the desktop then who's fault is that exactly? I hardly think that the users can be blamed for that, it's much more likely the IT department that is making those kinds of decisions.

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Chrome Remote Desktop adds Linux to supported OS list

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Chrome Remote Desktop is a Chrome (the browser) extension that provides remote access to another desktop. Often suggested as a remote support tool, the technology is also a nice way to access a remote PC on which you left that file you really need to discuss in that meeting starting in ten minutes.

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Volvo Cars add Android Auto to its next generation cars

Filed under
Android
Linux

Volvo Cars has joined the Open Automotive Alliance to make the Android smartphone platform available to drivers through its new ground breaking user interface. This move brings together one of the world’s most progressive car companies and the world’s most popular smartphone platform, developed by Google.

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Android mirroring is now available on Chromecast

Filed under
Android
Google

Chromecast users can now start ‘mirroring’ their Android devices over the WiFi. Google has pushed an update for Chromecast, which adds this new feature to the device. The feature was already there on Apple TV and the star Android developer Koushik Dutta (Koush) also offered mirroring for his ‘AllCast’ app.

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Linux Kernel 3.15.5 Is Now Available for Download

Filed under
Linux

The fifth maintenance release of the current stable Linux kernel package, version 3.15, was announced last evening, July 9, by none other than Greg Kroah-Hartman. The release introduces numerous improvements and bug fixes.

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Why is Docker the new craze in virtualization and cloud computing?

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
OSS

It's OSCON time again, and this year the tech sector is abuzz with talk of cloud infrastructure. One of the more interesting startups is Docker, an ultra-lightweight containerization app that's brimming with potential

I caught up with the VP of Services for Docker, James Turnbull, who'll be running a Docker crash course at the con. Besides finding out what Docker is anyway, we discussed the cloud, open source contributing, and getting a real job.

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Fedora Gets A Kernel Playground Repository

Filed under
Red Hat

The latest Fedora Copr repository established provides a "kernel playground" whereby currently out-of-tree and/or experimental kernel features are enabled for developers and enthusiasts to try out.

Josh Boyer of the Fedora Project has setup the Fedora Kernel Playground as a Copr repository to use if you wish to try out bleeding-edge Linux kernel features. This kernel isn't officially supported, bug reports will be largely ignored, and this kernel isn't recommended for production machines. However, for those wishing to try out kernel features not even found in Fedora Rawhide, this is a great repository without having to patch and spin your own kernel.

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Android DLP projector doubles as a mobile hotspot

Filed under
Android

Sprint has launched the “LivePro,” an Android-based, ZTE-built DLP projector and 3G/4G mobile hotspot shareable by eight WiFi-users, with a 4-inch display.

ZTE showed off the LivePro at January’s CES show as its “Projector Hotspot“, and it’s now coming to the U.S. via Sprint under the LivePro name. On July 11, Sprint will begin selling the device for $450, or $299 with a two-year contract. Of course, the real money is in the data plans, which start at $35 per month for 3GB of data.

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Early Reviews of Android Wear Reflect Promise for the Platform

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Android

This week, following much talk about it coming out of the Google I/O conference, there are a lot of discussions arising about Android Wear and whether it will become the next big mobile platform. Some early smartwatches running the open platform are appearing, and some reviewers are really liking them. Just as you once didn't carry a smartphone, and then did, are you on the cusp of owning an open source smartwatch?

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try out experimental linux kernel features with the kernel-playground

Filed under
Linux

Josh Boyer (Fedora Kernel team member & FESCo Nominee) recently announced the new kernel-playground COPR repo. Basically, this is a repo for users that want to try out some new and shiny (yet not ready for primetime) kernel features in Fedora, such as the overlayfs “union” filesystem, and kdbus (the in-kernel d-bus replacement).

It is important to note that this new kernel-playground is an “unsupported” kernel, designed for developers of the new features they include, as well as curious users that want to test out these bleeding edge features, and that.

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To Linux Foundation SysAdmin Ryan Day, Elegance is the Best Tool

Filed under
Linux

System administrators keep our lives and work seamlessly humming. They are the super heroes who often go unnoticed and unrecognized only until things go wrong. And so, leading up to SysAdmin Day on July 25, we're honoring the hard work of our Linux Foundation sysadmins with a series of profiles that highlights who they are and what they do.

Ryan Day is one of nine Linux Foundation system administrators, and is part of the global team that supports developers working on collaborative projects. Here he describes a typical work day, talks about his favorite tools, his nightmare scenario, and how he spends his free time, among other things.

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First step reached for Mageia 5: alpha 1 is available for tests

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OS

Time has come again for ISO testing!

Here is the first step towards Mageia 5. Most of your favorite software has been updated to their latest versions. There is still a long road ahead, but all in all, this first alpha is in rather good shape.

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Operating System U: a new Linux, Wayland based operating system

Filed under
Linux

Enter Operating System U, OSu. It’s not Ohio State University with a lower-case “u.” The “u” is for you, the one reading this, and the one wishing to control your operating system. The standout thing about OSu is how much customization it gives to the user. That’s our mission and our statement. (It also happens to be our mission statement, but I’m done with little jokes).

OSu is Linux-based. It boasts a Wayland display server, which I love because it squashes clunky xorg extensions and renders directly. We’re also looking at starlight and customization through GUI’s.

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Security company says your data can easily be recovered from 'wiped' Android phones

Filed under
Android

Software maker Avast is calling the security and thoroughness of Android's factory reset feature into serious doubt today. The company says it purchased 20 used Android smartphones online and set out to test whether personal user data could be recovered from them. Each phone had been reset prior to being sold, according to Avast, so in theory the test should have failed miserably. But that's not what happened.

Using widely available forensic software, Avast says it was able to successfully pull up over 40,000 photos previously stored on the phones. Many of those featured children, and others were sexual in nature with women in "various stages of undress" and hundreds of "male nude selfies." The company also managed to recover old Google search queries, emails, and texts. All told, Avast successfully identified four original phone owners using data that those people falsely assumed had been permanently deleted. Users must overwrite previous data to truly get rid of it, Avast says.

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