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Latest Chromium OS build for the GPD Pocket 1 and 2 brings hardware, software fixes for these mini-laptops

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OS

The GPD Pocket and Pocket 2 are tiny laptops small enough to fold up and slide into (some) pockets… thus the name. With 7 inch touchscreen displays and QWERTY keyboards, they’re about as small as you can get while still supporting touch-typing on a laptop.

GPD ships the Pocket mini-laptops with Windows 10 software, but independent developers have been porting alternate operating systems for years. You can run GNU/Linux distributions (there’s even a version of Ubuntu MATE designed for these little PCs). And developer Keith Myers has been offering up builds of Chromium OS for those that want to turn their GPD devices into tiny Chromebooks.

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GNU Guix 1.2.0 released

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OS
GNU

We are pleased to announce the release of GNU Guix version 1.2.0, right in time to celebrate the eighth anniversary of Guix!

The release comes with ISO-9660 installation images, a virtual machine image, and with tarballs to install the package manager on top of your GNU/Linux distro, either from source or from binaries. Guix users can update by running guix pull.

It’s been almost 7 months since the last release, during which 200 people contributed code and packages, and a number of people contributed to other important tasks—code review, system administration, translation, web site updates, Outreachy mentoring, you name it!

There’s been more than 10,200 commits in that time frame and it is the challenge of these release notes to summarize all that activity.

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The release cycle of a Zorin OS Linux distribution explained

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OS
Linux

In this article, as part of my Zorin OS beginners course, I want to explain how Linux distribution releases work and why that could be important for you. Unlike many other Linux distributions, the Zorin OS developers focus on absolute reliability and stability and consciously choose not to be a leader in all bleeding edge developments. In order to do that, Zorin OS is always based on what is called an LTS, or Long Term Support, release. So in this short article I will explain in simple terms the release cycle of the Zorin OS Linux distribution.

In my free Zorin OS tutorial series I explain in an accessible and beginner friendly way everything you need to know to get the most out of Zorin OS. Click below to see a complete overview of all chapters of my Zorin OS beginner course.

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Ubuntu Web Remix 20.04.1: First Stable Version Of Chrome OS Alternative

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OS
Web
Ubuntu

It’s been over four months since I reported about the arrival of yet another Ubuntu-based Linux distribution called Ubuntu Web Remix.

So, if you were also waiting for it just like me, the wait is over because its creator, Rudra Saraswat, has finally announced and made its first stable release, Ubuntu Web Remix 20.04.1, available to download.

To remind you, after Ubuntu Unity and UbuntuEd, Ubuntu Web is the third unofficial Ubuntu remix distros by the same developer Rudra Saraswat.

Unlike the other two, Ubuntu Web Remix aims to be a web-centric operating system and an alternative to Google’s Chrome OS or Chromium OS.

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MicroOS Is Immutable Linux

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OS
SUSE

Linux finds a lot of uses in computers that aren’t desktops. But there is a problem. What happens if your mission-critical control computer or retail kiosk gets an update and then fails? Happens all the time with Windows and it can happen with Linux, too. The openSUSE project has an answer: MicroOS which bills itself as immutable. Aimed at container deployment, the operating system promises atomic updates with no disk changes during runtime. If an update does break something, the BTRFS file system allows you to roll back to a previous snapshot. [Tyler] installs the OS and gives it a walkthrough in the video below.

As [Tyler] found, there are not many applications installed by default. Instead, you are expected to install flatpaks so the applications live in their own containers, isolated from the operating system and each other.

Of course, this isn’t for everyone. On the other hand, there is something seductive about having a computer that is very reliable even in the face of updates. Of course, you can do snapshots with BTRFS or ZFS anywhere those are supported, but unless you are very careful, you might have problems with dependencies for applications and the wrong update can still ruin your day. The OS supports GNOME or KDE, with system requirements that claim you can run it in 1GB of RAM and 20GB of disk space. We’d imagine you’ll be happier if you have more, of course.

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PAPPL 1.0 Beta Released For Ultimately Replacing CUPS Printer Driver

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OS
Linux

The open-source CUPS printing system is stagnate since Michael Sweet left Apple but the CUPS founder hasn't left the printing scene. He's been spending most of the year working on the PAPPL framework. This is a C-based framework for developing CUPS Printer Applications and aims to be a replacement for printer drivers. PAPPL is designed for uses such as with the LPrint and Gutenprint projects. LPrint is a label printer application also by Michael Sweet while Gutenprint are drivers for use with CUPS and GIMP.

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How To Install Trisquel 9.0 Etiona

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OS
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial explains step by step to have your computer with Trisquel 9.0. Don’t worry this is intended for beginners so everyone can try. You will prepare at least two disk partitions and going through about twenty minutes to finish it. For your information, different to Ubuntu, Trisquel supports 32 bit as well as 64 bit computers and I encourage fellow Lenovo ThinkPad owners to try it happily. You can practice this guide either normally, in dualboot mode, bios legacy and uefi, or into external storage device. Last but not least, you can also do this inside a virtual machine like AQEMU. Now let’s go!

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MuditaOS: A Beautiful and Minimal Open Source Mobile Operating System for Feature Phones

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OS
OSS

Find the always connected smartphones too distracting and privacy invasive? Let’s go back to the pre-2010 era and enjoy the simplicity of feature phones but with a modern design with MuditaOS.

There are a few open source mobile operating systems existing already. Let me add one more to this list.

Unlike most other mobile operating systems, MuditaOS is not interested in serving smartphones. Let’s have a look at it.

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Endless OS 3.9.0 Released With Linux 5.8, GNOME 3.38, Flatpak 1.8.2

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OS

The Endless team has released a new stable version 3.9.0 of its Linux-based Endless OS with tons of new features, improvements, and core component updates.

Starting with the core elements, version 3.9.0 features Linux kernel 5.8, which brings support for the latest hardware, file system, GPU drivers, and security.

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JumpDrive OS flashing tool now supports PineTab and 3GB PinePhone

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OS

One of the nice thing about Pine64‘s Linux smartphones and tablets is that they’re configured to automatically boot from a properly prepared microSD card. So whether you buy a PinePhone with postmarketOS, Manjaro, or Ubuntu Touch pre-installed, you can try out alternate operating systems by loading them on a removable storage card.

But there’s a bit of a performance hit when you do this, because the data transfer rates for the PinePhone and PineTab microSD card readers aren’t very fast. So you may want to consider flashing a new OS directly to the device’s built-in eMMC storage.

That’s where JumpDrive comes in. It’s a utility that makes it easy to flash a disk image to eMMC storage, troubleshoot problems and more. Developer Martijn Braam has just released a new version of JumpDrive that adds support for newer hardware.

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More in Tux Machines

Xfce Virtual Machine Images For Development

The openSUSE distributions offer a variety of graphical desktop environments, one of them being the popular and lightweight Xfce. Up to now there was the stable tested branch available in Tumbleweed already during install. Furthermore, for interested users the development OBS repository xfce:next offered a preview state of what’s coming up next to Tumbleweed. Xfce Development in openSUSE Thanks to the hard work of openSUSE’s Xfce team there is a third option: Xfce Development Repository aka RAT In a playful way, a rat is meant to represent the unpolished nature of this release: a rat is scruffy looking compared to a mouse (the cute and beloved mascot of Xfce). And the RAT repository provides packages automatically built right from the Git Master Branch of Xfce upstream development. The goal of this project is to test and preview the new software so that bugs can be spotted and fixed ahead of time by contributing upstream. The packages pull in source code state on a daily basis and offer a quite convenient way to test and eventually help development. So this is where the team builds and tests the latest and unstable releases of Xfce Desktop Environment for openSUSE. Read more

Radeon RX 6800 Series Performance Comes Out Even Faster With Newest Linux Code

Last week we delivered AMD Radeon RX 6800 / RX 6800 XT Linux benchmarks and the performance was great both for Linux gaming as well as the OpenCL compute performance. But for as good as those Big Navi numbers were on the open-source Linux graphics driver stack, they are now even better. That launch-day testing was based on the Linux state in the second-half of October when the cards arrived and initial (re-)testing began in preparing for the Radeon RX 6800 series reviews -- not only the Radeon RX 6800 series but re-testing all of the other AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards for the comparison too. Thanks to the rate of the open-source graphics driver progression and the newest code always being available, now just days after launch the numbers are even more compelling for Linux gamers with the slightly newer Linux 5.10 and Mesa Git compared to just weeks ago. In particular were the last minute NGG fixes and other Big Navi tweaks along with an important Radeon RX 6800 (non-XT) fix. There has also been other RADV improvements and more that accumulated in Mesa 21.0-devel this month. On the kernel side, Linux 5.10 is still at play. Both the old and newer Mesa snapshots were also on LLVM 11.0. Read more Also: Intel: AMD Gimps On Battery-Powered Laptop Performance - But DPTF On Linux Still Sucks - Phoronix

today's howtos

  • How to Install and Configure Hadoop on Ubuntu 20.04 – TecAdmin

    Hadoop is a free, open-source and Java-based software framework used for storage and processing of large datasets on clusters of machines. It uses HDFS to store its data and process these data using MapReduce. It is an ecosystem of Big Data tools that are primarily used for data mining and machine learning. Apache Hadoop 3.3 come with noticeable improvements any many bug fixes over the previous releases. It has four major components such as Hadoop Common, HDFS, YARN, and MapReduce.

  • How to create a Cloudwatch Event Rule in AWS

    A near-real-time stream of system events that describe changes in AWS resources is delivered by CloudWatch Events. We can create a rule that matches events and route them to one or more target functions. We can use CloudWatch Events to schedule automated actions. These actions can be self-triggered at certain times using cron or rate expressions. We can have EC2 instances, Lambda functions, Kinesis Data Streams, ECS tasks, Batch jobs, SNS topics, SQS queues, and a few more services as target endpoints for CloudWatch Events. To know more about Cloudwatch events, visit the official AWS documentation here.

  • How to use Bash file test operators in Linux

    File Test Operators are used in Linux to check and verify attributes of files like ownership or if they are a symlink. Every Test operator has a specific purpose. The most important operators are -e and -s. In this article, you will learn to test files using the if statement followed by some important test operators in Linux.

  • How To Install Wireguard on CentOS 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Wireguard on CentOS 8. For those of you who didn’t know, Wireguard is an open-source, dependable, advanced, VPN tunneling software you can install and use right now to create a secure, point-to-point connection to a server. It is cross-platform and can run almost anywhere, including Linux, Windows, Android, and macOS. Wireguard is a peer-to-peer VPN. it does not use the client-server model. Depending on its configuration, a peer can act as a traditional server or client. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of the Wireguard VPN on CentOS 8.

  • How To Install NVM on CentOS/RHEL 7 – TecAdmin

    NVM stands for Node Version Manager is a command-line utility for managing Node versions. Sometimes you required to deploy multiple node application with different-2 versions. Managing the multiple Node.js versions for differnt-2 projects are a pain for the developers. But NVM helped to easily manage multiple active Node.js versions on a single system. This tutorial will explain you to install NVM on CentOS/RHEL 7/6 systems and manage multiple Node.js versions.

  • How to install Kali Linux 2020.4 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Kali Linux 2020.4.

  • How to make your own personal VPN in under 30 minutes

    In the Distribution box, choose the newest available Ubuntu LTS release — as of the time of writing, that's 20.04 LTS. Below that, pick the region you want your VPN to be located in. It's possible to change the location later, but you'll have to contact Linode support. For the plan, select 'Nanode 1GB' from the list of Shared CPU options. VPNs don't need much processing power, so this low-spec option will work just fine.

  • Use nnn as a File Manager for Linux Terminal - Make Tech Easier

    If you have used the Linux terminal for an extended period of time, you probably know some of the useful commands, like cd to move into and out of folders, create new ones, and copy or move files. Still, you may prefer how desktop file managers are more user-friendly and quicker for some tasks. In that case, you’ll love nnn. nnn is the equivalent of a desktop file manager for the terminal. Although not an ultra-complex solution like Midnight Commander, nnn is light on resources, fast, and allows you to navigate your file system without having to type commands.

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