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Samsung discontinues ‘Linux on DeX’ program

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OS
Android
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Samsung discontinues ‘Linux on DeX’ program, removing support w/ Android 10

    Late last year, Samsung and Canonical partnered on an app that allowed select Galaxy phones to run a full Linux desktop on top of Android. Less than a year later, Samsung has announced that they’re discontinuing the Linux on DeX program, coinciding with the update to Android 10.

    One of the sci-fi-style dreams that many of us have had since the onset of smartphones is the idea of plugging your phone into a desktop-size monitor to get a desktop-style experience. Through the years, many have attempted it in earnest, and the latest offering from Samsung brought an interesting approach.

  • Samsung Calls It Quits on the ‘Linux on DeX’ Project

    Samsung DeX, if you have heard of it, allows the users to turn their Galaxy phones into desktop PCs simply by connecting a monitor and other peripherals. The company made DeX more welcoming and useful for Galaxy flagship users by partnering with Canonical earlier last year. It made it possible for users to run a full Linux desktop instance on its DeX-supported flagship phones.

    This was an amazing feature for developers and users who didn’t really like carrying a laptop with them. They could rely on their Galaxy flagship (including the Galaxy S and Note-series) for a desktop-like experience, running Ubuntu on the move. However, the response to Linux on DeX seems to have been lackluster and Samsung has decided to shutter this project.

  • Samsung is discontinuing Linux support on Dex

    Samsung goes on to explain that starting with its Android 10 beta ROMS, already rolling out on certain devices, Linux support will be removed from Dex altogether. This does make us wonder if, perhaps, the third-party OS emulation setup Samsung was employing to get Linux to work in the first place somehow breaks certain rules or security policies Google implemented with the latest Android version.

    Regardless of whether or not this is the case, if you are currently using Linux on Dex, you definitely want to start keeping regular backups of your data. Since, given current developments even staying on Android 9 and not updating your phone's Android OS still might not be a sure-fire way to keep the feature running.

Solus Brightens Computing Across the Linux User Spectrum

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OS
Linux
Reviews

Regardless of how you spend your time at the keyboard, Solus can be an ideal solution for all your computing needs. It comes with a collection of specially designed tools to make using and maintaining the operating system a uniquely easy experience.

For technically minded users, Solus supports a wide variety of editors, programming languages, compilers and version-control systems. It has tools for containerization/virtualization technology, such as Docker and Vagrant. Whether you're writing drivers in C or writing backend Web services in Go, there is software that will fit your needs.

Home or office users will be pleased with the latest LibreOffice suite version 6.2.1.2. The Solus Software Center has options for accounting, Personal Information Management and more. Content Creators can animate in Synfig Studio, produce music with Musescore or Mixxx, do graphic designing with GIMP or Inkscape, and edit videos with Avidemux, Kdenlive or Shotcut.

Gamers can enjoy open source games natively configured for Solus with support for many gamepads and controllers. With little or no setup required, gamers can play Steam titles for Linux with a modern, optimized gaming runtime. There is also built-in support for the Itch.io and Lutris gaming platforms.

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Proprietary Software and Security Issues

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OS
  • cPanel, Plesk or DirectAdmin: Analysis and Comparison

    Every OS differs in user interface, security, functionality, usability and pricing, and the final decision should be based on personal needs and expectations. cPanel, Plesk and DirectAdmin all offer a number of great services, functions and tools for successful and efficient VPS management and because of their differences, individual demands can be met, and situations resolved.

  • Netflix won’t ‘shy away from taking bold swings’ as streaming competition heats up

    This increase in subscriber growth this quarter came from an affluence of original content, including Stranger Things’ third season, which saw 64 million accounts watch the newest season in the first four weeks, according to the company. Netflix recently signed co-creators Matt and Ross Duffer to an overall deal with the streaming service, which will see them produce more TV shows and films for Netflix.

  • House panel pushes forward election security legislation

    The panel marked up and approved the SHIELD Act, which takes aim at foreign election interference by requiring U.S. campaigns to report “illicit offers” of election assistance from foreign governments or individuals to both the FBI and the Federal Election Commission (FEC).

    The legislation also takes steps to ensure that political advertisements on social media are subject to the same stricter rules as ads on television or radio.

  • New Voting Machines Will Be Used For Nov. 5 Municipal Elections

    The new system which cost the state about $52 million replaces the 15-year-old one previously used. Charleston County Board of Elections and Registration Director Joseph Debney said while the new system may not be more efficient, it offers more transparency than the previous one. Replacement provides the state with a dependable system for years to come and will greatly enhance the security of the election process. Having a paper record of each voter’s ballot will add an additional layer of security as it allows for audits of paper ballots to verify vote totals.

    The system works using a Ballot-Marking Device (BMD) that helps voters mark a paper ballot more accurately and efficiently. A voter’s choices are presented on a touch screen similar to the old voting machines. The BMD allows the voter to mark the choices on-screen and when the voter is done, prints the selections on paper ballots which then are either hand counted or counted using an optical scanner/tabulator, the second machine.

  • Chhattisgarh dumps EVMs, back to ballot paper

    Chhattisgarh would perhaps be the first state in the country to do away with EVMs in favour of ballot paper in the local body polls.

  • Andhra Pradesh Elections: Complaints of EVM glitches [sic] in nearly 50 booths

    Talking to reporters, the Chief Minister referred to technical glitches in EVMs and said he was demanding that ballot papers be re-introduced. "No developed country is using EVMs as they are prone to manipulation. We have hence been demanding that we revert to the ballot paper system," Naidu said.

  • Chhattisgarh may return to paper ballots for local bodies polls

    In a report submitted on Tuesday, cabinet sub-committee constituted by the Baghel government has recommended the use of paper ballots instead of EVMs in the upcoming urban local body elections.

    The recommendations by the cabinet sub-committee would be referred to the state cabinet headed by CM Baghel for approval.

  • Microsoft unveils two open-source projects for building cloud and edge applications [Ed: Microsoft: our 'clown computing' with NSA back doors is all proprietary software but to trap your work and your data we are openwashing the tools to put them there]

    The new projects include the Open Application Model, which is a specification for building cloud-native apps on Kubernetes, and Dapr, a portable event-driven runtime for building microservices-based apps that can run in the cloud and on edge devices.

  • Top Linux antivirus software

    The last several years have seen a startling increase in malware that targets Linux. Some estimates suggest that Linux malware account for more than a third of the known attacks. In 2019, for example, new Linux-specific attacks included the Silex worm, GoLang malware, the Zombieload side-channel attack, the Hiddenwasp Trojan, the EvilGnome spyware and Lilocked ransomware. The volume and severity of attacks against Linux are clearly on the rise.

    While Linux has some advantages when it comes to security, the Linux kernel is certainly not devoid of security vulnerabilities nor is it immune to attack. The worst thing you can do is to sit back and assume that Linux systems are safe simply because a larger number of desktops are running Windows.

    Tools are available to defend Linux systems from many types of attack, and quite a few of these are free and open source. These are some of the best tools that you can get for free or at modest cost.

Which Raspberry Pi OS should you use?

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OS
Linux

There are a wide range of different Raspberry Pi OS packages available and choosing the correct one for your hardware, application or project is not always easy. Here we compliled a list of popular operating systems for the Raspberry Pi range of single board computers, providing a quick insight into what you can expect from each and how you can use it to build a variety of different applications from games emulators. To fully functional desktop replacements using the powerful Raspberry Pi 4 mini PC, as well as as few more specialist Raspberry Pi OSes. Instructional videos are also included detailing how to install and setup the various OSes, allowing you to quickly choose which Raspberry Pi OS is best for your project.

If you are starting out with the Raspberry Pi and class yourself as a beginner then the NOOBS Raspberry Pi OS is a great place to start. A number of online stores sell affordable SD cards pre-installed with NOOBS, ready to use straight away. Although if you have any spare SD cards lying around you can also download the NOOBS distribution directly from the Raspberry Pi Foundation website.

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Python Across Platforms

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OS
Development
  • Chemists bitten by Python scripts: How different OSes produced different results during test number-crunching

    Chemistry boffins at the University of Hawaii have found, rather disturbingly, that different computer operating systems running a particular set of Python scripts used for their research can produce different results when running the same code.

    In a research paper published last week in the academic journal Organic Letters, chemists Jayanti Bhandari Neupane, Ram Neupane, Yuheng Luo, Wesley Yoshida, Rui Sun, and Philip Williams describe their efforts to verify an experiment involving cyanobacteria, better known as blue-green algae.

    Williams, associate chair and professor in the department of chemistry at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, said in a phone interview with The Register on Monday this week that his group was looking at secondary metabolites, like penicillin, that can be used to treat cancer or Alzheimer's.

  • Chemists discover cross-platform Python scripts not so cross-platform

    In a paper published October 8, researchers at the University of Hawaii found that a programming error in a set of Python scripts commonly used for computational analysis of chemistry data returned varying results based on which operating system they were run on—throwing doubt on the results of more than 150 published chemistry studies. While trying to analyze results from an experiment involving cyanobacteria, the researchers—Jayanti Bhandari Neupane, Ram Neupane, Yuheng Luo, Wesley Yoshida, Rui Sun, and Philip Williams—discovered significant variations in results run against the same nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) data.

    The scripts, called the "Willoughby-Hoye" scripts after their authors—Patrick Willoughby and Thomas Hoye of the University of Minnesota—were found to return correct results on macOS Mavericks and Windows 10. But on macOS Mojave and Ubuntu, the results were off by nearly a full percent.

Project Trident 2020 OS Migration

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OS
GNU
Linux
BSD

After several months of examination and testing of the various operating systems that are available right now, we have reached a conclusion. Project Trident will rebasing with Void Linux.

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Also: Project Trident Switching From TrueOS/FreeBSD Distribution To Basing On Void Linux

Tired of Windows and Mac OS? Switch to Elementary OS!

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OS

Elementary OS is one of the most beautiful and clean-looking operating systems available for use in computers. It is fast, open and privacy-oriented. Elementary has its characteristic design philosophy and made aesthetic use of colours. Over the years, this free-to-use operating system has collected heavy praise by reviewers around the world – making it a strong replacement option for both Windows and Mac users.

The initial development of ElementaryOS started with building themes and applications for Ubuntu, which later inspired the developers to transform it into a full-fledged Linux distribution. The first release of the operating system was on 31 March 2011, and so far, it has been through continuous bugfix and major feature updates.

The Elementary OS took shape with the concept of making Linux easier for non-technical users. Instead of terminal-based codes, elementary provides a graphical user interface and settings menus to allow users to perform almost all day-to-day tasks without writing any code.

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SerenityOS: From zero to HTML in a year

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OS
Development
Web

The Serenity operating system turns 1 year old today. I'm counting from the first commit in the git repository, on October 10, 2018. Parts of the code had been around for a while before that, so this first commit was really about putting everything I was tinkering with into a shared repo.

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Tails 4.0 Anonymous OS Release Candidate Out Now with Tor Browser 9.0, Linux 5.3

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OS
Security

Powered by the latest Linux 5.3.2 kernel, Tails 4.0 Release Candidate is packed with up-to-date technologies to better protect your privacy when surfing the Internet. It comes with the latest alpha version of the upcoming TOR Browser 9.0 anonymous web browser based on Firefox 68.1.0 ESR, as well as the newest Tor 0.4.1.6 release.

Tails 4.0 Release Candidate also updates Electrum to version 3.3.8, which is fully compatible with the current Bitcoin network, and improves the usability of the Tails Greeter by making it easier to select languages, simplifying the list of keyboard layouts, fixing the Formats setting, and preventing additional settings from being applied when clicking on the Cancel or Back buttons.

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Torrential – An Open-Source Torrent Client for elementaryOS

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OS
OSS

We have covered several torrent client applications on FossMint in topics such as 10 Best Cloud Torrent Service Providers and Best BitTorrent Client Apps for Linux in 2019. But as you already know by now, at least one new open-source application is created every other week.

Today, I bring you an open-source application developed for the torrenting world and it goes by the name of Torrential.

Torrential is a simple open-source torrent client designed for elementary OS users to download torrents in style while enjoying speed and minimalistic design experience.

It doesn’t have any settings unique to it, though, so technically it is another torrent client alternative that hopes to provide users with a speedy torrenting experience. However, as is expected of all Linux client applications, you can customize Torrential’s look using themes.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices/Open Hardware

  • Site.js and Pi

    Chatting about Pi, on a Pi, with a chat server running on Site.js on the same Pi.

  • This MicroATX Motherboard is Based on Phytium FT2000/4 Arm Desktop SoC @ 3.0 GHz
  • Rikomagic R6 Review – Part 1: Android Mini Projector’s Unboxing and First Boot

    Rikomagic R6 is a mini Android projector that looks like a vintage radio, or depending on your point of view a mini vintage television.

  • Brief on Behalf of Amicus Curiae Open Source Hardware Association in Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc., No. 18-2214 (Fed. Cir.)

    Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc. is a case of first impression for the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The question on appeal is whether a design patent’s scope is tied to the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent. In this amicus brief, the Open Source Hardware Association (“OSHWA”) explains the potential effects on open source hardware development, and design practice generally, of untethering design patent protection from the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent. A large percentage of open-source hardware combines both ornamental and functional elements, and industrial design routinely involves applying design concepts from disparate fields in novel ways. To engage in this practice, open-source hardware designers need to know the universe of available source material and its limits. Further, understanding the licensing requirements of open-source hardware begins with understanding how the elements that make up that hardware may or may not be protected by existing law. Accordingly, while many creators of open-source hardware do not seek patent protection for their own creations, an understandable scope of design patent protection is nonetheless essential to their ability to collaborate with other innovators and innovate lawfully. The brief argues that the District Court in the case—and every district court that has considered the issue—correctly anchored the patented design to the article of manufacture when construing the patent. The brief explains that anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture is the best approach, for several reasons. Connecting the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture calibrates the scope of design patent protection to the patentee’s contribution over the prior art. It avoids encumbering the novel and nonobvious application of prior designs to new articles of manufacture, a fundamental and inventive practice of industrial design. It aligns the scope of design patent protection with its purpose: encouraging the inventive application of a design to an article of manufacture. This balances protection for innovative designs with later innovators’ interest in developing future designs. Finally, anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture helps fulfill design patent law’s notice function by clarifying the scope of protection.

Graphics: Gallium3D and AMDGPU

  • Gallium3D's Mesa State Tracker Sees "Mega Cleanup" For NIR In Mesa 19.3

    AMD developer Marek Olšák has landed a "mega cleanup" to the Gallium3D Mesa state tracker code around its NIR intermediate representation handling. As part of getting the NIR support in good enough shape for default usage by the RadeonSI driver, Marek has been working on a number of clean-ups involving the common Gallium / Mesa state tracker code for NIR.

  • AMDGPU DC Looks To Have PSR Squared Away - Power-Savings For Newer AMD Laptops

    It looks like as soon as Linux 5.5 is where the AMDGPU kernel driver could be ready with Panel Self Refresh (PSR) support for enabling this power-savings feature on newer AMD laptops. While Intel's Linux driver stack has been supporting Panel Self Refresh for years, the AMD support in their open-source Linux driver code has been a long time coming. We've seen them working towards the support since Raven Ridge and now it appears the groundwork has been laid and they are ready to flip it on within the Display Core "DC" code.

today's howtos and programming bits

  • CentOS 8 Package Management with DNF on the Command Line
  • AdamW’s Debugging Adventures: “dnf is locked by another application”
  • Managing user accounts with Cockpit
  • Download Ubuntu 19.10 ISO image to install on VirtualBox VM
  • GNU poke: Dealing with alternatives - Unions in Poke

    Computing with data whose form is not the most convenient way to be manipulated, like is often the case in unstructured binary data, requires performing a preliminary step that transforms the data into a more convenient representation, usually featuring a higher level of abstraction. This step is known in computer jargon as unmarshalling, when the data is fetch from some storage or transmission media or, more generally, decoding. Once the computation has been performed, the result should be transformed back to the low-level representation to be stored or transmitted. This is performed in a closing step known as marshalling or, more generally, encoding. Consider the following C program whose purpose is to read a 32-bit signed integer from a byte-oriented storage media at a given offset, multiply it by two, and store the result at the same offset.

  • Android NDK r21 moves to beta

    Android announced that NDK r21 is now in beta. Android NDK is a toolset for implementing parts of an app in native code. The release — which is the first long term support release — includes improved defaults for better security and performance. One of the key features in the release is an update to GNU Make to version 4.2, which provides a number of bug fixes, and enables ‘–output-sync’ to avoid interleaving output with error messages, the team explained. This is enabled by default with ndk-build. Additionally, GDB, the GNU project debugger, has been updated to version 8.3, which includes fixes for debugging modern Intel CPUs.

  • What is the history behind C Programming and Unix?

    If you think C programming and Unix are unrelated, then you are making a big mistake. Back in the 1970s and 1980s, if the Unix engineers at Bell Labs had decided to use another programming language instead of C to develop a new version of Unix, then we would be talking about that language today. The relationship between the two is simple; Unix is the first operating system that is implemented with a high-level C programming language, got its fame and power from Unix. Of course, our statement about C being a high-level programming language is not true in today’s world. This article is an excerpt from the book Extreme C by Kamran Amini. Kamran teaches you to use C’s power. Apply object-oriented design principles to your procedural C code. You will gain new insight into algorithm design, functions, and structures. You’ll also understand how C works with UNIX, how to implement OO principles in C, and what multiprocessing is.

Server: Mirantis, Containers, GraalVM and Pensando

  • Mirantis Partners With OpenStack Foundation to Support Upgraded COA Exam

    “With the OpenStack market forecasted to grow to $7.7 billion by 2022 according to 451 research, the demand for Certified OpenStack Administrators is clearly strong and set to continue growing for many years to come,” said Mark Collier, COO of the OpenStack Foundation. “We are excited to collaborate with Mirantis, who has stepped up to provide the resources needed to manage the COA, including the administration of the vendor-neutral OpenStack certification exam.”

  • How to use containers with an eye on security

    Containers are all the rage. With good reason. With containers, your company’s apps and service deployments become considerably more agile, more reliable, and even more secure. This is true for software development companies (who develop apps and services for other businesses), as well as companies looking to roll out web-based and mobile applications with an unheard of speed and reliability. But with any new technology, comes hurdles. One of the biggest hurdles for any business is security. Data breaches have become rampant and it’s on the shoulders of every company to do everything in their power to make sure they are rolling out technology that is as secure as possible. This idea should certainly be applied to containers. But what can you do to use containers security? Fortunately, there are a few steps that you can take from the very beginning.

  • GraalVM: Clearing up confusion around the term and why Twitter uses it in production

    What does the “umbrella term” GraalVM stand for? We interviewed Chris Thalinger (Twitter) at JAX London 2019. Hear what he has to say about the meaning of Graal and how it can benefit Twitter as well as the environment.

  • Pensando Systems Exits Stealth Mode With Plans To Take On Amazon AWS

    While normally we don't cover hardware start-ups on Phoronix, Pensando Systems has just exited stealth and given their focus will be heavily involved with Linux and in fact already have their first kernel driver mainlined. After announcing a $145 million (USD) Series-C round, Pensando Systems exited "stealth" and revealed the first details of what they are trying to achieve with this company led by many ex-Cisco staff. [...] Pensando has been on our radar since as I wrote about last month when they were just a stealth networking startup they already upstreamed their first Linux kernel driver. In the Linux 5.4 kernel is a Pensando "Ionic" driver for a family of network adapters. In this week's press release, Pensando didn't specifically call out Ionic but presumably is the backbone to their hardware. Now that they are beginning to talk about their ambitions, hopefully we see more Linux kernel patches from them soon.