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Privacy Focused Android Rom Without Google Functionality Based On LineageOS Enters Beta

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OS
Android

A few years back there were a lot mobile OS systems, we had Symbian, Blackberry OS and IOS among many others. Google entered the market with Android, although it wasn’t an instant hit, they gained huge momentum overtime.

Part of Android’s success was definitely due to its open source nature and the massive customisation it offered. Android somewhat bridged the gap between budget and premium smartphones at that time, because it enabled so many functions on budget devices, it was truly something back then.

With time Android became a behemoth in mobile OS, but along with that Google was also benefitted. The OS used Google Maps, Gmail, Chrome, Google Play, YouTube and a lot of other customary Google software. This meant huge AD revenues but also privacy concerns as it’s well known that Google can pull out a lot of usage data from Android devices.

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Also: iPhone to Android: The ultimate switching guide

Touch-enabled version of Raspberry Pi based Kano kit arrives

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OS
Hardware

Kano has launched a $280 “Computer Kit Touch” version of its Raspberry Pi based computing education kit with an RPi 3B, a 10.1-inch HD touchscreen, plus a keyboard, speaker, mic, and 3000mAh battery.

Kano’s Raspberry Pi Model B based Kano kit computing education platform and Raspberry Pi 3 Model B based Kano Computer Kit were huge hits in both the educational and consumer markets. The company has now returned with a Computer Kit Touch version, which similarly aims to teach kids age 6 to 13 to program using visual tools and its Debian-based Kano OS.

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Sailfish OS "Nurmonjoki" Released and Eelo Beta

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OS
Gadgets
  • Sailfish OS Nurmonjoki is now available

    After a very warm summer here in Northern Europe, many well deserved holidays are taken and many sailors are now rested after a year of full-on work. Sailors that were on duty during the summer have however worked on the latest iteration of Sailfish OS updates for our beloved community! After much developing and testing, we are now ready to release Sailfish OS 2.2.1. Sailfish OS 2.2.1 is named after the river Nurmonjoki which is located 300km north of Helsinki, on south western part of Finland.

  • Sailfish OS "Nurmonjoki" Released For GDPR Compliance, App Updates

    While Jolla's Linux-based Sailfish OS mobile operating system hasn't turned out to be as great as many anticipated, today the Finnish company released Sailfish OS 2.2.1 under the Nurmonjoki codename.

  • /e/ first beta soon to be released

    Next week, on Tuesday or Wednesday, we will release the first beta of /e/ mobile OS.

    I will then describe choices that have been done, what’s in, what’s not in, what remains to do, what to test and how. And probably a challenge for testers.

    [...]

    Of course we cannot support the 17K+ known Android devices. As the /e/ ROM itself is forked from LineageOS we can build for all LOS 14.1 (Android Nougat) supported devices, and not yet for LOS 15 (Android Oreo) supported devices (work in progress).

DOSBox 0.74-2

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OS
OSS
  • DOSBox 0.74-2 has been released!
  • DOSBox 0.74-2 Released With Better Wine Compatibility, Linux OpenGL Fixes

    DOSBox, the DOS emulator used by Wine and also can be run directly on Linux / macOS / Windows / BSD systems, released version 0.74-2 at the end of August with some Wine compatibility improvements.

    DOSBox 0.74-2 is another maintenance release while DOSBox 0.75 will be coming soon with game fixes and other improvements. But for DOSBox 0.74-2 it's also notable for having the latest patches from the Wine project for improving compatibility, with Wine relying upon DOSBox for Virtual 8086 Mode and other DOS functionality.

Doing One Thing, Well: The UNIX Philosophy

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OS
GNU
BSD

The Unix operating system has been around for decades, and it and its lookalikes (mainly Linux) are a critical part of the computing world. Apple’s operating system, macOS, is Unix-based, as are Solaris and BSD. Even if you’ve never directly used one of these operating systems, at least two-thirds of all websites are served by Unix or Unix-like software. And, if you’ve ever picked up a smart phone, chances are it was running either a Unix variant or the Linux-driven Android. The core reason that Unix has been so ubiquitous isn’t its accessibility, or cost, or user interface design, although these things helped. The root cause of its success is its design philosophy.

Good design is crucial for success. Whether that’s good design of a piece of software, infrastructure like a railroad or power grid, or even something relatively simple like a flag, without good design your project is essentially doomed. Although you might be able to build a workable one-off electronics project that’s a rat’s nest of wires, or a prototype of something that gets the job done but isn’t user-friendly or scalable, for a large-scale project a set of good design principles from the start is key.

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Beta release nears for BeOS-inspired open source OS Haiku

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OS

Just over 17 years since the project launched, and more than 18 years since the last release of the operating system that inspired it, the open source Haiku OS is nearing a beta release.

It has been a long road for Haiku: The project launched in August 2001, initially named “OpenBeOS”.

BeOS was one of the great ‘could have been’ desktop OSes: Launched in in 1995, the system almost became the operating system for Apple’s hardware. Instead, Apple decided to go with OpenStep — developed by NeXTSTEP, which was founded by Steve Jobs after he was ousted from Apple in 1985.

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Funding for Auterion

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OS
OSS
  • Auterion raises $10 million for open source drone operating system

    Auterion has raised $10 million in funding for its open source commercial drone operating system and launched its drone OS today as an enterprise version of the PX4 open source standard.

    The Zurich, Switzerland-based company will use the money to scale its operations and speed up development of its platform.

    The funding comes from Lakestar, Mosaic Ventures, Costanoa Ventures, and Tectonic Ventures. Auterion will continue to work in close alignment with the PX4 community, the most widely used open source drone autopilot software, to bring the technology to the enterprise.

  • Open source drone software startup Auterion lands $10M seed funding

    Auterion, a startup that offers a drone operating system built on top of the popular PX4 open source software, has landed $10 million in seed funding. Backing the round is Lakestar, Mosaic Ventures, Costanoa Ventures, and Tectonic Ventures.

    The young Swiss company says the injection of cash will be used to work closely with the wider PX4 community to further develop the open source code, and to bring the technology to more enterprise customers in the form of the Auterion platform.

Oracle Solaris 11.4

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OS
Server
  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Released for General Availability

    I'm pleased to announce the release of Oracle Solaris 11.4. Of the four releases of Oracle Solaris that I've been involved in, this is the best one yet!

    Oracle Solaris is the trusted business platform that you depend on. Oracle Solaris 11 gives you consistent compatibility, is simple to use and is designed to always be secure.

  • Solaris 11.4 released

    Congrats to my colleagues in the Solaris team who released Solaris 11.4 today. Despite the 11.x moniker, this is actually a major Solaris release; Oracle has just decided to go down the perpetual macOS X / Windows 10 version numbering route from now on. (This development is unlikely to faze Solaris veterans, who have been using SunOS 5.x since 1992.)

  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Officially Released

    Two years after Solaris 11.3 and Oracle opting for a "continuous delivery" model of 11.next updates instead of a "Solaris 12", Solaris 11.4 is out the door today.

    Oracle is talking up Solaris 11.4 with its general availability release as "the trusted business platform", "consistent compatibility, is simple to use and is designed to always be secure", "more than 3,000 applications certified to run on it", and "the only operating system that has completed UNIX V7 certification."

Debian-Based Neptune Linux 5.5 Operating System Released with LibreOffice 6.1

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OS
Debian

Coming only a month after the Neptune 5.4 release that introduced a new dark theme and updated several components, Neptune 5.5 bumps the kernel version to Linux kernel 4.17.8 and updates the graphics stack to Mesa 18.1.6, AMDGPU DDX 18.0.1, Nouveau DDX 1.0.15, and ATI/Radeon DDX 18.0.1.

"This update represents the current state of Neptune 5 and renews the ISO file so if you install Neptune you don't have to download tons of Updates," writes Leszek Lesner in today's announcement. "In this update we improved hardware support further by providing Linux Kernel 4.17.8 with improved drivers and bugfixes."

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Tails 3.9 Anonymous OS Is Coming September 5 with TrueCrypt & VeraCrypt Support

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OS
Debian

That's right, we're talking about Tails 3.9, which is currently in development with a Release Candidate ready for public testing as we speak. As we reported a few weeks ago, Tails devs planned on implementing support for opening VeraCrypt encrypted drives in the GNOME desktop environment that's used by default in Tails.

Tails 3.9 promises to be the first release to ship with VeraCrypt support, but it also looks like there will be support for opening TrueCrypt encrypted volumes as well, straight from your GNOME desktop. Moreover, this release will integrate the "Additional Software Packages" feature into the desktop.

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Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

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    After reading Mike’s blog post about official Mozilla Firefox switch to LLVM Clang, I was wondering if we should also use that setup for official Fedora Firefox binaries. The numbers look strong but as Honza Hubicka mentioned, Mozilla uses pretty ancient GCC6 to create binaries and it’s not very fair to compare it with up-to date LLVM Clang 6. Also if I’m reading the mozilla bug correctly the PGO/LTO is not yet enabled for Linux, only plain optimized builds are used for now…which means the transition at Mozilla is not so far than I expected.
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Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
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