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Solus 1.2 Is Coming Soon with a Much-Improved Installer, Many New Features Exclusive

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OS

Solus 1.2 is coming very soon, believe it, and we had the pleasure of chatting with Solus Project leader Ikey Doherty during the last few days about various Solus-related things, including what's coming in the major release.

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Maru OS exits private beta, lets you use an Android phone as a Linux desktop

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OS
Android
Linux

Maru OS is a platform that lets you run both Google Android and Debian Linux on a smartphone. Use your device as a phone, and it’ll act like any other Android phone. Connect an external display, mouse, and keyboard and you’ve got a full-fledged Debian Linux desktop environment.

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NetOS, NetOS Enterprise and NetOS Education Released as Chrome OS Alternatives

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OS

Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO of Black Lab Software (PC/OpenSystems LLC), the company behind the Black Lab Linux operating system series, informs Softpedia today about the general availability of the NetOS, NetOS Enterprise, and NetOS Education OSes.

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Chrome OS vs. Endless OS

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OS

Over the years, I've seen a number of attempts to create the first truly use anywhere, idiot-proof Linux PC. And until recently, Chromebooks (anything with ChromeOS) was easily the winner.

Then a PC company known as Endless did something that really surprised me – they released their highly customized version of Ubuntu GNOME into something everyone could try. Will it beat out ChromeOS in terms of access, simplicity and overall value? Let's take a gander and find out.

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ReactOS Is a Promising Open Source Windows Replacement

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OS
OSS
Reviews

ReactOS is the closest working clone of the proprietary Microsoft Windows OS that currently is available. Its developers are meeting their stated goal of creating a quality operating system that is compatible with applications and drivers written for the Microsoft Windows NT family of operating systems: NT4, 2000, XP, Windows 2003, Vista and Windows 7.

What they have not fully explained is how ReactOS avoids the vulnerabilities that render the outdated OSes unsafe to use online today. The Windows OS security flaws may not be a pressing issue, though, since the developers have created a clone rather than duplicating Windows code.

Open source fans might be drawn to future developments of ReactOS for the same reasons of choice and freedom that draw them to the Linux OS families.

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CoreOS launches Torus, a new open source distributed storage system

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OS
OSS

CoreOS today announced the launch of Torus, its latest open source project. Just like CoreOS’s other projects, Torus is all about giving startups and enterprises access to the same kind of technologies that web-scale companies like Google already use internally. In the case of Torus, that’s distributed storage.

The idea behind Torus is to give developers access to a reliable and scalable storage system for applications that have been deployed on containers using the Google-incubated Kubernetes container management service.

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Also: Presenting Torus: A modern distributed storage system by CoreOS

Mozilla turns Firefox OS into IoT hub

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OS
Moz/FF

As an operating system, Firefox OS has undergone a massive transformation in the past 24 months – it’s far more than just a web browser nowadays. But now Mozilla is looking to take Firefox to the next level by using it as a hub for a plethora of Internet of Things projects.

Mozilla is currently working on four IoT projects behind the scenes: Project Smart Home, Project Link, Project Sensor Web and Vaani. Each of the projects will deal with IoT technology in different ways, but all are aimed at making the end consumer’s home and devices smarter. In a blog post, Mozilla’s SVP of Connected Devices, Ari Jaaksi, posted: “Everything is connected around us. This revolution has already started and it will be bigger than previous technology revolutions, including the mobile smartphone revolution. Internet of Things, as many call it today, will fundamentally affect all of us.”

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Secure Desktops with Qubes: Introduction

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OS
Security

This is the first in a multipart series on Qubes OS, a security-focused operating system that is fundamentally different from any other Linux desktop I've ever used and one I personally switched to during the past couple months. In this first article, I provide an overview of what Qubes is, some of the approaches it takes that are completely different from what you might be used to on a Linux desktop and some of its particularly interesting security features. In future articles, I'll give more how-to guides on installing and configuring it and how to use some of its more-advanced features.

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Solus Project Announces New Tool for Enabling Better Steam Integration on Linux

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OS
Linux

Ikey Doherty and the Solus Project are proud to announce today the availability of a new project that aims to better integrate the Steam client on various GNU/Linux operating systems.

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Custom Chromium OS Build Now Available for 64-Bit Laptop and Desktop Computers

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OS

GNU/Linux and Android-x86 developer Arne Exton has informed Softpedia today, May 26, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of his custom Chromium OS build.

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Linux Practicality vs Activism

One of the greatest things about running Linux is the freedom it provides. Where the division among the Linux community appears is in how we value this freedom. For some, the freedom enjoyed by using Linux is the freedom from vendor lock-in or high software costs. Most would call this a practical consideration. Others users would tell you the freedom they enjoy is software freedom. This means embracing Linux distributions that support the Free Software Movement, avoiding proprietary software completely and all things related. Read more

What is the Fedora Modularity project and how do you get involved ?

The Fedora Modularity Project is an effort to fix several problems that all distributions face. One of them is the disconnect between Fedora's release cycle and the release cycle of larger Fedora components like for example GNOME, KDE or even the kernel. Those components obviously don't have the same lifecycle that Fedora follows and Fedora can't always wait for major components to be released upstream and on the other hand doesn't want to ship outdated software. An earlier attempt to work around this disconnect were the Fedora Rings with a central core 'base design', a concentric ring #2 around it for 'environments and stacks' and a ring #3 for applications. It wasn't possible to have different release cycles for packages in ring #2 as dependencies wouldn't allow that most of the time. Read more

antiX 16 & OpenMandriva 3.0 Beta 2 Release, openSUSE Numbers

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Linux Practicality vs Activism

One of the greatest things about running Linux is the freedom it provides. Where the division among the Linux community appears is in how we value this freedom. For some, the freedom enjoyed by using Linux is the freedom from vendor lock-in or high software costs. Most would call this a practical consideration. Others users would tell you the freedom they enjoy is software freedom. This means embracing Linux distributions that support the Free Software Movement, avoiding proprietary software completely and all things related. In this article, I'll walk you through some of the differences between these two freedoms and how they affect Linux usage. Read more