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Amiga Enthusiast Gets Quake Running On Killer NIC PowerPC CPU Core

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OS
Hardware
Gaming

The Amiga community remains one of the most passionate and inventive we have ever seen, even now, decades after Commodore’s demise. A couple of weeks back, we featured just a few recent projects that were designed to breathe new life into aging Amiga systems, or at the very least ensure they remain repairable for the foreseeable future. Our article explaining how to build a cheap Amiga emulator using a Raspberry Pi was immensely popular as well. Today, however, we stumbled across a video that encapsulates the ingenuity of many of the more technical folks in the Amiga community. What it shows is an Amiga 3000UX, equipped with a Voodoo 3 card and BigFoot Networks Killer NIC M1, running some software – including Quake – on the Killer NIC’s on-board Power PC processor.

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Elementary OS Juno Brings Only Slight Changes to an Outstanding Platform

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OS
Linux

Elementary OS has been my distribution of choice for some time now. I find it a perfect blend of usability, elegance, and stability. Out of the box, Elementary doesn’t include a lot of apps, but it does offer plenty of style and all the apps you could want are an AppCenter away. And with the upcoming release, the numbering scheme changes. Named Juno, the next iteration will skip the .5 number and go directly to 5.0. Why? Because Elementary OS is far from a pre-release operating system and the development teams wanted to do away with any possible confusion.

Elementary, 0.4 (aka Loki) is about as stable a Linux operating system as I have ever used. And although Elementary OS 5.0 does promise to be a very natural evolution from .4, it is still very much in beta, but ready for testing. Because Juno is based on Ubuntu 18.04, it enjoys a rock-solid base, so the foundation of the OS will already be incredibly stable.

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OpenWrt, the Linux OS for your router, releases a first major update in over two years

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OS
Linux

OpenWrt, the Linux-based open source operating system for routers and other embedded devices, has been updated to version version 18.06. It is the first stable release since the reunification with the forked LEDE (Linux Embedded Development Environment) project. OperWrt 18.06 is the successor to the previous stable LEDE 17.01 and OpenWrt 15.05 releases.

OpenWrt last released a major update, OpenWrt 15.05.1, in March 2016. A few months later, a separate project, LEDE, was forked out of OpenWrt, in an attempt to create an open source community with greater transparency and inclusiveness. LEDE was formed by a group of OpenWrt developers who were not happy with some of the decisions being made by the core OpenWrt team.

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OpenWRT 18.06 Released, Their First Update Since Merging With LEDE

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OS

OpenWRT 18.06 is now available as the router/networking/embedded-focused Linux distribution.

OpenWRT 18.06 is a significant release in that it's the first since the OpenWRT and LEDE projects decided to merge under the unified OpenWRT umbrella following the two year fork of the "Linux Embedded Development Environment" (LEDE).

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Also: IPFire 2.21 – Core Update 122 Introduces New Linux Kernel Support and Overall Improvements

A single-user, lightweight OS for your next home project

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OS

What on earth is RISC OS? Well, it's not a new kind of Linux. And it's not someone's take on Windows. In fact, released in 1987, it's older than either of these. But you wouldn't necessarily realize it by looking at it.

The point-and-click graphic user interface features a pinboard and an icon bar across the bottom for your active applications. So, it looks eerily like Windows 95, eight years before it happened.

This OS was originally written for the Acorn Archimedes. The Acorn RISC Machines CPU in this computer was completely new hardware that needed completely new software to run on it. This was the original operating system for the ARM chip, long before anyone had thought of Android or Armbian.

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Linux Without systemd: Why You Should Use Devuan, the Debian Fork

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OS

Debian 8 was the first version to adopt systemd. The Devuan project began at that time, but the first stable release didn’t land until 2017, alongside the release of Debian 9.

Devuan uses the same APT package manager as Debian, but it maintains its own package repositories. Those are the servers that store the software you download using APT.

Devuan’s repositories contain the same software as Debian, only with patches that enable programs to run without systemd. This mainly refers to backend components such as policykit, which manages which users can access or modify certain parts of your PC.

What Is It Like to Use Devuan?

Just like with Debian, there are multiple ways to install Devuan. The “minimal” download provides you with the essential tools you need to get Devuan up and running on your machine. The “live” download provides you with a working desktop that you can test out before installing Devuan onto your computer.

Devuan uses the Xfce desktop environment by default. This is a traditional computing environment akin to how PC interfaces looked several decades ago. Functionally, Xfce is still able to handle most tasks people have come to expect from computers today.

The live version of Devuan comes with plenty of software to cover general expectations. Mozilla Firefox is available for browsing the web. LibreOffice is there for opening and editing documents. GIMP can alter photos and other images. These apps all function as you would expect, with no concern for which init system you’re running.

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HOPE XII: A FOSS Operating System for e-Readers

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OS
OSS

Free and open source software (FOSS) was a recurring theme during many of the talks during the HOPE XII conference, which should probably come as no surprise. Hackers aren’t big fans of being monitored by faceless corporate overlords or being told what they can and cannot do on the hardware they purchased. Replacing proprietary software with FOSS alternatives is a way to put control back into the hands of the user, so naturally many of the talks pushed the idea.

In most cases that took the form of advising you to move your Windows or Mac OS computer over to a more open operating system such as GNU/Linux. Sound advice if you’re looking for software freedom, but it’s a bit quaint to limit such thinking to the desktop in 2018. We increasingly depend on mobile computing devices, and more often than not those are locked down hard with not only a closed proprietary operating system but also a “Walled Garden” style content delivery system. What’s the point of running all FOSS software at home on your desktop if you’re carrying a proprietary mobile device around?

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New SteamOS Stable Release Brings Latest Updates from Debian GNU/Linux 8.11

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OS
Debian

SteamOS 2.154 has been released today to the brewmaster channel as the new stable version of the operating system and it appears to be based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.11, the last point release of the Debian Jessie operating system series, which reached end of life last month on June 17, 2018.

According to Valve's Pierre-Loup Griffais, SteamOS 2.154 contains the same updates that were pushed earlier this month to the SteamOS 2.151 beta release, so it should be considered a minor bugfix release as Valve continues to work on a major new version that would probably be based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" and feature updated kernel and graphics stacks.

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Also: SteamOS 2.154 Released As Valve Preps Kernel & Driver Upgrades

ReactOS 0.4.9 released

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OS

The ReactOS Project is pleased to announce the release of version 0.4.9, the latest in our accelerated cadence targeting a release every three months.

While a consequence of this faster cycle might mean fewer headliner changes, much of the visible effort nowadays comes in the form of quality-of-life improvements in how ReactOS functions. At the same time work continues on the underlying systems which provide more subtle improvements such as greater system stability and general consistency.

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Also: ReactOS 0.4.9 Officially Released As The First Self-Hosting Version, Better Stability

ReactOS 0.4.9 Officially Released with Self-Hosting Capabilities, New Features

Red Hat and CentOS Fix Kernel Bug in Latest OS Versions, Urge Users to Update

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OS
Red Hat
Security

It would appear the there was a bug in the previous Linux kernel update for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 and CentOS Linux 7.5 releases, which was released to address the Spectre V4 security vulnerability, making connection tracking information to not function correctly, which could lead to connectivity loss and leaking of configuration properties related to the respective connection tracking into other namespaces.

"Previously, the connection tracking information was not cleared properly for packets forwarded to another network namespace," said Red Hat in an advisory. "Packets that were marked with the "NOTRACK" target in one namespace were excluded from connection tracking even in the new namespace. Consequently, a loss of connectivity occasionally occurred, depending on the packet filtering ruleset of the other network namespaces."

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Also: Red Hat Open-Sources Scanner That Checks Linux Binaries For Spectre V1 Potential

Red Hat Continues Driving Wonderful Innovations In Fedora Workstation

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • GUADEC 2018 Reminiscences
    This year’s GUADEC in Almería, Spain, was over two months ago, and so here is a long overdue post about it. It was so long ago that I might as well call it a reminiscence! This will be a different kind of post than the ones I’ve done in past years, as plenty of other bloggers have already posted summaries about the talks.
  • Rugged, Linux-ready transportation PC has four SIM slots
    Nexcom’s Apollo Lake based “VTC 6220-BK” in-vehicle PC features triple displays, 2x SATA bays, 3x GbE with optional PoE, Ublox GPS, and 4x mini-PCIe or M.2 slots paired with SIM slots. Intel-based in-vehicle computers have been around for a while — here’s a Linux-friendly Kontron model from 2004 -– but over the last year or two the market has picked up considerably. Like many in-vehicle systems, Nexcom’s VTC 6220-BK is not an automotive IVI computer, but like Lanner’s Apollo Lake based V3G and V3S systems, is designed for buses. The rugged VTC 6220-BK straddles the IVI and telematics worlds, offering triple display support for passenger entertainment plus CAN and OBD connections.
  • FreeBSD Desktop – Part 16 – Configuration – Pause Any Application
    After using UNIX for so many years I knew that I could freeze (or pause) any process in the system with kill -17 (SIGSTOP) signal and then unfreeze it with with kill -19 (SIGCONT) signal as I described in the Process Management section of the Ghost in the Shell – Part 2 article. Doing it that way for the desktop applications is PITA to say the least. Can you imagine opening xterm(1) terminal and searching for all Chromium or Firefox processes and then freezing them one by one every time you need it? Me neither. Fortunately with introduction of so called X11 helper utilities – like xdotool(1) – it is now possible to implement it in more usable manner.
  • Custom Sustes Malware Infects Linux and IoT Servers Worldwide [Ed: This only impacts poorly-secured and already-cracked servers. The article overstates the risk.]
    The dangerous characteristic is the fact that an estimate of the infected computers cannot be made at this time. The only way to prevent the infiltrations is to strengthen the network security of the Linux and IoT servers exposed in public. It is very possible that further attacks will be carried out with other distribution tactics.
  • C Programming | Introduction | Features – For Beginners
    C is a general-purpose programming language developed by the ultimate god of the programming world, “Mr.Dennis Ritchie” (Creator of C programming ). The language is mainly used to create a wide range of applications for operating systems like windows and iOS. The popularity of the language can be clearly seen as this language has made to the list of top 10 programming languages in the world.

'We expect this is the bottom' in enterprise growth: Red Hat CEO

OSS Leftovers

  • AxonIQ Launches New Open Source Server
    AxonIQ, the company behind the open source Axon Framework, launches Axon 4.0 the open, integrated development and operations tool for Microservices and Event Sourcing on the JVM.
  • L10N Report: September Edition
  • Tidelift surpasses $1M to pay open source software maintainers
    Tidelift announced that it has surpassed one million dollars committed via its platform to pay open source software maintainers to provide professional assurances for their projects, as momentum behind this new approach to professional open source continues to build. Over 100 packages are already on the Tidelift platform, with maintainers getting paid to provide support for their packages through the Tidelift Subscription. Top packages featured include Vue, Material-UI, Babel, Gulp, Fabric, Active Admin, Doctrine, and StandardJS. With Tidelift, software development teams receive assurances around maintenance, security, and licensing from a single source. By bringing together maintainers with a global market of customers, Tidelift is helping make open source work better for everyone.
  • Artifex and First National Title Insurance Company Reach Settlement Over MuPDF Open Source Dispute
    Artifex Software, Inc. and First National Title Insurance Company announced today a confidential agreement to settle their legal dispute. Case No. 4: 18-cv-00503-SBA, filed by Artifex in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, concerned the use of Artifex's open source software MuPDF under the GNU Affero General Public License and the GNU General Public License. While the parties had their differences in the interpretation of the open source licenses, the companies were able to reach an amicable resolution based on their mutual respect for and recognition of copyright protection and the open source philosophy. Terms of the settlement remain confidential.

EEE, Entryism and Openwashing

  • New Linux distro specifically designed for Windows comes to the Microsoft Store [Ed: WLinux or Whitewater Foundry not the first time people exploit Microsoft to put a price tag on FOSS such as LibreOffice. Microsoft is doing a fine job sabotaging the GNU/Linux 'ecosystem'.]
    WLinux is based on Debian, and the developer, Whitewater Foundry, claims their custom distro will also allow faster patching of security and compatibility issues that appear from time to time between upstream distros and WSL. [...] In return for saving developers time Whitewater Foundry is charging $19.99 (though the app is currently 50% off and the distribution can be downloaded from Github for free).
  • Open source dev gets Win32 apps running on Xbox One [Ed: Running blobs on two DRM platforms does not make you "Open source dev"]
  • Building Blocks of Secure Development: How to Make Open Source Work for You [Ed: Veracode self-promotion in "webinar" form, badmouthing FOSS to push their proprietary things. They work with Microsoft.]
  • SD Times open source project of the week: TonY [Ed: Openwashing of a surveillance operation at Microsoft]
    Unsatisfied with the available solutions for connecting the analytics-generating power of their TensorFlow machine learning implementations with the scalable data computation and storage capabilities of their Apache Hadoop clusters, developers at LinkedIn decided that they’d take matters into their own hands with the development of this week’s highlighted project, TonY.
  • Open Source: Automating Release Notes in Github [Ed: The New York Times is still propping up Microsoft hosting]
  • Opendesk launches augmented-reality shopping for its open-source furniture [Ed: Calling furniture "open"]
    Opendesk customers can now use augmented reality to see how the furniture brand's pieces look in their homes before ordering them from local makers. The augmented-reality (AR) experience launched with the arrival of Apple's iOS 12 operating system this week. It enables customers to use their smartphones to view some of Opendesk's furniture superimposed on the room in front of them.
  • Open Source Testing Startup Cypress Leaves Beta With Thousands of Users, Launches Paid Plans [Ed: This is not Open Source; they misuse the label and even put dashes ("open-source") because they know they're faking it.]
    Cypress.io‘s CEO Drew Lanham explains that the startup’s tool is software created by developers, for developers. The company was founded in 2014 by technologist Brian Mann, after observing that while computing and application development had changed drastically over the past decade, software testing had not. Large companies now release thousands of software updates a year, often on a daily basis across their organization. Technology teams aim to move rapidly, iterating on an agile basis and working in parallel so they can sync their code together even faster. But, as Lanham explains, the testing software out there was far outdated for these agile processes.
  • Kindred Introduces SenseAct, the First Reinforcement Learning Open-Source Toolkit for Physical Robots [Ed: Kindred or SenseAct not actually FOSS; but they sure try to make it seem that way, by focusing on a toolkit.]