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Solus 3 Released Here Is What's New in Solus 3

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OS
Linux

The newest Solus releases are ready for download from here for installation on most modern Intel and AMD based personal computers. Remember that you can choose between Budgie, GNOME, and MATE desktop options. Thanks for reading and share your thoughts and comments with us.

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CoreOS Tectonic Platform Aims to Free the Cloud

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OS

CoreOS on Thursday announced the general availability of the Kubernetes container management Tectonic platform on Microsoft's Azure cloud.

The Tectonic platform enables enterprises to run Kubernetes on a single platform across various cloud and bare metal environments. Prior to this release, the Tectonic platform was available on Amazon Web Services and bare metal servers.

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SteamOS vs. Ubuntu vs. Windows 10: Which Is The Best Operating System For Gaming?

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OS
Gaming
Ubuntu

Steam will continue to support Linux as we’ve seen on previous occasions, but other hardware companies should also lend a helping hand. This will include the likes of Intel, AMD, NVIDIA and others which control the driver stack.

If it took decades for Linux to improve heavily, then we should not ruin your expectations a tad bit because it will take several more years to further reduce that performance gap between Windows 10 and the latter. However, the fact that Linux is getting there should mean that Microsoft has something to worry.

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Linux-based postmarketOS project aims to give smartphones a 10-year lifecycle

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OS
Linux

The folks behind postmarketOS want to go even further: they’re developing a Linux-based alternative to Android with the goal of providing up to 10 years of support for old smartphones.

That’s the goal anyway. Right now the developers have only taken the first steps.

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RancherOS: A tiny Linux for Docker lovers

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OS

Like the various Linux server and desktop distributions, the container-oriented Linux distributions mix and match various projects and components to construct a complete container infrastructure. These distros generally combine a minimal OS kernel, an orchestration framework, and an ecosystem of container services. RancherOS not only fits the mold, but takes the minimal kernel and the container paradigm to extremes.

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Open-spec audio streaming SBC runs Linux on a 996MHz i.MX6 ULL

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OS
Linux
Debian

PolyVection’s “VoltaStream Zero” is an audio streaming SBC that runs Linux on a 996MHz i.MX6 ULL, and offers a TI PCM5121 DAC, TOSLINK, USB, and WiFi.

In 2013, Berlin based software developer Philip Voigt decided to build his own music streaming system. As detailed in this blog entry, Voight started with a Raspberry Pi, but decided it lacked the features he needed. He then tried working with a BeagleBone design, but found the board too complex and expensive — especially the prospect of duplicating the 6-layer PCB. Voight also evaluated several computer-on-module based designs, but after playing around with a vastly improved KiCAD PCB design and layout package, he decided to build an SBC from scratch.

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Finally, Solus Operating System Is Getting Support for Ubuntu's Snap Packages

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OS

You won't believe this, but Canonical's Snappy team announced on Wednesday that the Solus Project development team is working on bringing Snappy support to their Solus operating system.

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Fedora 24 Linux OS Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Fedora 26 or Fedora 25 Today

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OS
Red Hat

Starting today, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system officially reached end of life and it will no longer receive security or software updates. Users are now urged to upgrade to a supported release, such as Fedora 25 or the newly launched Fedora 26

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IncludeOS and Haiku OS

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OS
  • IncludeOS: a unikernel for C++ applications

    Is it truly an efficient use of cloud computing resources to run traditional operating systems inside virtual machines? In many cases, it isn't. An interesting alternative is to bundle a program into a unikernel, which is a single-tasking library operating system made specifically for running a single application in the cloud. A unikernel packs everything needed to run an application into a tiny bundle and, in theory, this approach would save disk space, memory, and processor time compared to running a full traditional operating system. IncludeOS is such a unikernel; it was created to support C++ applications. Like other unikernels, it is designed for resource-efficiency on shared infrastructure, and is primarily meant to run on a hypervisor.

    Frequently, virtual machines end up running a full server operating system, though the entire instance is devoted to running only a few applications or even just one. However, every running instance on a physical machine means a full set of services and binaries that's unnecessarily replicated. Unikernel developers take the opportunity to aggressively pare down the operating system to a bare minimum. Unikernels are at the extreme end of the possible answers to the question "how small can you make an operating system?" A unikernel is an instance of a single program "baked together" with a small library that provides the operating system and acts as an interface to the (virtual) hardware.

  • Haiku monthly activity report - 07/2017

    Time for another monthly report! It covers hrev51254-hrev51346

  • Haiku OS Continues Work On 64-bit Support, Software Updater

    Fans of the BeOS-inspired Haiku operating system will see a lot of work going into the open-source OS over the summer.

Qubes OS 4.0-rc1 has been released!

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OS

No doubt this release marks a major milestone in Qubes OS development. The single most import undertaking which sets this release apart, is the complete rewrite of the Qubes Core Stack. We have a separate set of posts detailing the changes (Why/What/How), and the first post is planned to be released in the coming 2 weeks.

This new Core Stack allows to easily extend the Qubes Architecture in new directions, allowing us to finally build (in a clean way) lots of things we’ve wanted for years, but which would have been too complex to build on the “old” Qubes infrastructure. The new Qubes Admin API, which we introduced in a recent post, is a prime example of one such feature. (Technically speaking, we’ve neatly put the Admin API at the heart of the new Qubes Core Stack so that it really is part of the Core Stack, not merely an “application” built on top of it.)

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More in Tux Machines

Mastodon 2.0

About 6 months have passed since April, during which the major mainstream breakthrough of our decentralized social network took place. From 20,000 users to almost a million! What better time to run through a couple examples of what’s been introduced since then? Mastodon is defined by its focus on good user experience, polished design and superior anti-abuse tools. In that vein, the web app has received numerous updates. Using the latest browser features, the web app receives real push notifications, making it almost indistinguishable from a native mobile app. It works faster and looks smoother thanks to many performance and design improvements. Read more

Red Hat: Satellite, OpenShift, Government, SoftBank

  • A Red Hat Satellite tutorial to install an update server
    Is server patch management the best part of your job? Stop reading here. Many IT organizations struggle with OS patching processes. For Red Hat administrators who are willing to invest some initial energy to simplify later tasks, Satellite provides infrastructure lifecycle management, including capabilities for provisioning, reporting and configuration management. To this end, follow this Red Hat Satellite tutorial to set up a simple server for updates. Once we review how to install the basic update server, we'll create one example client.
  • Red Hat updates Gluster storage for OpenShift container apps
    Red Hat bolstered Gluster storage for its OpenShift Container Platform, adding iSCSI block and S3 object interfaces, as well as greater persistent volume density.
  • Red Hat to Cover Open Source Collaboration at Gov’t Symposium; Paul Smith Comments
    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) is set to hold its annual symposium on federal information technology on Nov. 9 where the company will host discussions on open source collaboration and its potential benefits for government, GovCon Executive reported Oct. 11.
  • Red Hat’s Container Technologies and Knowledge Were Chosen by SoftBank to Embrace DevOps
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that several of Red Hat’s open source technologies, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, as well as the knowledge of Red Hat Consulting, were chosen by SoftBank Corp (“SoftBank”), a subsidiary of SoftBank Group Corp., to implement DevOps methodology for its Service Platform Division, IT Service Development Division, Information Technology Unit, and Technology Unit, the company’s in-house IT organization. This large, varied organization develops, maintains and operates SoftBank’s IT systems for internal work and operations, supporting 600 diverse systems.
  • Form 4 RED HAT INC For: Oct 17 Filed by: Kelly Michael A
  • Taking a Fresh Look at Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)

Security: Google Play, WPA2, FERC, HackerOne

  • 8 'Minecraft' apps infected with Sockbot malware on Google Play found adding devices to botnet

    Security researchers have discovered that at least eight malware-laced apps on Google Play Store are ensnaring devices to a botnet to potentially carry out distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) and other malicious attacks. These apps claimed to provide skins to tweak the look of characters in the popular Minecraft: Pocket Edition game and have been downloaded as many as 2.6 million times.

  • KRACK Vulnerability: What You Need To Know
    This week security researchers announced a newly discovered vulnerability dubbed KRACK, which affects several common security protocols for Wi-Fi, including WPA (Wireless Protected Access) and WPA2. This is a bad vulnerability in that it likely affects billions of devices, many of which are hard to patch and will remain vulnerable for a long time. Yet in light of the sometimes overblown media coverage, it’s important to keep the impact of KRACK in perspective: KRACK does not affect HTTPS traffic, and KRACK’s discovery does not mean all Wi-Fi networks are under attack. For most people, the sanest thing to do is simply continue using wireless Internet access.
  • FERC sets rules to protect grid from malware spread through laptops
    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday proposed new mandatory cybersecurity controls to protect the utility system from the threat posed by laptops and other mobile devices that could spread malicious software. The standards are meant to "further enhance the reliability and resilience of the nation's bulk electric system" by preventing malware from infecting utility networks and bringing down the power grid, according to the nation's grid regulator.
  • Hack These Apps And Earn $1,000 — Bug Bounty Program Launched By Google And HackerOne
  • Security Vulnerability Puts Linux Kernel at Risk

Smartphone Waste and Tizen News