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Budgie Desktop To Begin Decoupling From GNOME, Will Use Qt

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OS

The Solus desktop environment has delivered innovations on a number of fronts, including its work on the Budgie desktop that has a growing following. While Budgie Desktop started off as being based upon GNOME, now the developers are working to decouple from GNOME and begin making use of the Qt tool-kit.

Developer Ikey Doherty wrote a blog post today on the development work going into Budgie 11, the next major version of their desktop. They are working to "deGNOME" their desktop due to consistently hitting API/ABI breakage and other changes with each GNOME release.

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Flatpak 0.8.1 Lets Users Update Apps by Installing Newer Bundles, Fixes Bugs

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OS
GNU
Linux

It's been a month since Flatpak 0.8 major release hit the streets for GNU/Linux distribution that want to offer their users fast and easy access to various third-party apps that aren't available in the official repositories of the respective OS.

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Solus Goes Flatpak for Better, Reliable Distribution of Third-Party Applications

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OS

In an unexpected turn of events, Ikey Doherty, the founder and lead developer of the Solus Project announced a few moments ago that he's adopting the well-known Flatpak application sandboxing and distribution framework for the Solus operating system.

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Goodbye Solaris

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OS
Server
  • Guilty SPARC: Oracle euthanizes Solaris 12, expunging it from roadmap

    Rumors have been circulating since late last year that Oracle was planning to kill development of the Solaris operating system, with major layoffs coming to the operating system's development team. Others speculated that future versions of the Unix platform Oracle acquired with Sun Microsystems would be designed for the cloud and built for the Intel platform only and that the SPARC processor line would meet its demise. The good news, based on a recently released Oracle roadmap for the SPARC platform, is that both Solaris and SPARC appear to have a future.

    The bad news is that the next major version of Solaris—Solaris 12— has apparently been canceled, as it has disappeared from the roadmap. Instead, it's been replaced with "Solaris 11.next"—and that version is apparently the only update planned for the operating system through 2021.

  • Oracle Finally Confirms It's Canning Solaris 12

    At the beginning of December there were rumors of Oracle canning Solaris and now that's finally been confirmed by Oracle more or less as they will not be delivering Solaris 12.

    According to Ars, they got confirmation from Oracle that they will not be going ahead with Solaris 12 as planned. Solaris 12 has been canceled and wiped off their roadmap. Oracle is said to be working on a "Solaris.next", but no details yet. This "Solaris.next" is also reportedly the only planned Solaris update through 2021.

antiX 16.1 Linux OS Is Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie," without Systemd

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OS
GNU
Linux
Debian

More than six months after its official release, the antiX 16 "Berta Cáceres" GNU/Linux distribution sees its first point release, based on the recently unveiled Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie" operating system.

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Q4OS 1.8.2 Is the First Linux OS to Be Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie"

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OS
GNU
Linux
Debian

Softpedia was informed today, January 16, 2017, by the developers of the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution about the availability of a new stable build of the 1.8 series.

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Ultimate Edition 5.1 Linux OS Is Out, Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Kernel 4.4

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OS
Ubuntu

After announcing the release of Ultimate Edition 5.0 Gamers Edition, an Ubuntu-based operating system designed for Linux gamers, last week, TheeMahn is now releasing Ultimate Edition 5.1.

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OpenELEC 7.0 Gets First Point Release, Improves SolidRun's CuBox-i4Pro Booting

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OS

The last days of 2016 brought us the OpenELEC 7.0 operating system for embedded devices, such as Raspberry Pi, which was based on the Kodi 16.1 open-source media center and allows users to transform those devices in HTPC (Home Theater PC) units.

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The Newest Linux Operating Systems and Who Should Try Them

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OS
GNU
Linux

Linux operating systems (known as “distributions” or “distros”) have constant releases and updates, with some more substantial than others. Updates usually bring minor fixes and tweaks, but occasionally new distro releases or iterations can yield major changes.

Picking the right distro depends on several factors. Whether it’s a fresh release or major update, check out these new Linux operating systems and who should try them.

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How To Break Free From Your Computer Operating System -- If You Dare

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OS
GNU
Linux

Weary of the "awful" hour-long updates his Windows computer forced him to periodically endure, usually during prime work hours, Farhang recently abandoned his PC operating system. He switched to Linux, an open-source OS.

The result? Linux turned his laptop into a "very good Mac OS clone," he says. And the price was right. He paid nothing for the software.

If you've upgraded your computer during the holidays and also are thinking of upgrading your operating system, you might be tempted to follow Farhang. But it's not an easy path, and it's not for everyone. I know because I just tried to do it.

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Also: Why do you use Linux?

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi based computer offers Real-Time Ethernet

Hilscher is prepping a rugged “netPI” computer that combines a Raspberry Pi 3 with its “netHAT 52-RTE” RPi add-on featuring dual Real-Time Ethernet ports. German Real-Time Ethernet experts Hilscher will soon launch a Raspberry Pi 3-based industrial computer with Real-Time Ethernet support. Hilscher has yet to formally announce the ruggedized netPI computer, but the board was demonstrated at the recent Embedded World show, and was revealed in a Mar. 27 Element14 Community blog by Shabaz. The system can be used as a Real-Time Ethernet gateway or controller, and it supports add-ons such as sensors or actuators to enable additional applications, writes Shabaz. Read more

GNOME Migration and Slideshow

  • The Linux Migration: Corporate Collaboration, Part 2
    Note that a number of folks have suggested alternative calendar applications. I’ve rejected these so far because I don’t think they’ll fit into my workflow or my environment, but they may work for others. Some of the applications I’ve seen suggested include Rainlendar, Calcurse, or KOrganizer. Some of these applications address some of the shortcomings of GNOME Calendar, but none of them address all the major issues I’ve outlined here (based on my testing thus far).
  • GNOME 3.24 Provides Users With More Pleasing Linux Desktop Experience

Dowry to Linux Foundation From NSA Ally

  • AT&T takes up membership in the Linux Foundation, furthers open source efforts
    AT&T has become a Platinum member in the Linux Foundation, a move that reflects the telco’s ongoing effort to implement open source and open networks not only in its own networks but also to drive broader industry collaboration. One example of this is AT&T's Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) architecture. In February, AT&T contributed several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that AT&T has become a Platinum member. This follows news of the company’s contribution of several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.

GNU/Linux on Servers: VisionMobile Report, Cilium, Microservices, and Kubernetes

  • VisionMobile Report Lays Out Developer Salaries by Skill, Software Sector, and Location
    In 2017, that means skilled cloud and backend developers, as well as those who work in emerging technologies including Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning and augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) can make more money -- tens or sometimes hundreds of times more -- than frontend web and mobile developers whose skills have become more commoditized. “In Western Europe, for example, the median backend developer earns 12% more than the median web developer; a machine learning developer makes 28% more,” according to the report.
  • Cilium leverages Linux kernel for advanced container networking
    Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier. Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.
  • Modules vs. microservices
    Much has been said about moving from monoliths to microservices. Besides rolling off the tongue nicely, it also seems like a no-brainer to chop up a monolith into microservices. But is this approach really the best choice for your organization? It’s true that there are many drawbacks to maintaining a messy monolithic application. But there is a compelling alternative which is often overlooked: modular application development. In this article, we'll explore what this alternative entails and show how it relates to building microservices.
  • What Is Kubernetes?
    Kubernetes is open source software for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. The project is governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which is hosted by The Linux Foundation. And it’s quickly becoming the Linux of the cloud, says Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. Running a container on a laptop is relatively simple. But connecting containers across multiple hosts, scaling them when needed, deploying applications without downtime, and service discovery among several aspects, are really hard challenges. Kubernetes addresses those challenges with a set of primitives and a powerful API.