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Multics resurrected: proto-Unix now runs on Raspberry Pi or x86

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OS

Seminal time-sharing OS Multics - the Multiplexed Information and Computing Service - has been resurrected in a new simulator.

As The Register reported in 2011, Multics' sprang from MIT's decision to eschew an IBM mainframe, buy one from GE instead and write an OS for the machine. The operating system's source code was released in 2007, when we noted Multics' place in history as one of the first OSes “...to introduce concepts such as a hierarchical file system and dynamic linking. It was also the first to use the modern standard of per-process stacks in the kernal, with a separate stack for each security ring.”

As our own Liam Proven wrote back in 2011, “Unix was conceived as a sort of anti-Multics – 'Uni' versus 'multi', geddit? Unix was meant to be small and simple, as opposed to the large, complicated Multics. Consider the labyrinthine complexity of modern Unix and ponder what Multics must have been like.”

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Endless OS 3.2 Released, Rebases From GNOME Shell 3.8 To 3.22

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OS

Endless OS 3.2 is now available as the newest feature release for this GNOME-based Linux operating system that ships on the budget-friendly Endless Computers and is also available for free to all users.

Endless OS 3.2 has a number of underlying system updates including to its Linux kernel and Flatpak. On the UI side, there are big updates to its desktop with the re-basing process from GNOME Shell 3.8 to GNOME Shell 3.22. Moving forward, they intend to re-base their desktop changes much more often to allow for a smoother transition to using the newer GNOME code in their operating system.

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Also: Endless OS 3.2 released!

Ars spends too much time trying to work in Haiku, the BeOS successor

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OS

And it started with such promise, too. Haiku, the open-source successor to the late and lamented BeOS—that late, lamented operating system of the 1990s developed at Apple refugee Jean-Louis Gassée's Be Inc. BeOS was intended to compete with the "classic" Apple MacOS and with Microsoft Windows; by 1996, Gassée was jockeying to get Apple to acquire his company and make BeOS the basis of the next-generation Macintosh operating system. But then along came some guy named Steve Jobs, with a company called NeXT. And the rest, as they say, is history. Be Inc. was eventually acquired by another doomed company (Palm) and dissolved.

Haiku (initially "OpenBeOS," but changed because of copyright assertions by Palm) was launched in 2001 to create an operating system that was binary-compatible with applications written for the ill-fated BeOS. It uses the same C++ API as BeOS, but it is a re-implementation of that API, so it shares virtually none of the code of the original BeOS. As it has evolved, Haiku has taken two diverging roads: a 32-bit version that retains backward compatibility, and a 64-bit version that is more forward-looking but breaks backward compatibility because of compiler issues. That's because the 32-bit version, (like BeOS before it, is based on Gnu Compiler Collection (GCC) 2.

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Important CentOS 7 Linux Kernel Security Update Patches Five Vulnerabilities

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OS
Security

CentOS maintainer Johnny Hughes recently published a new security advisory for user of the CentOS 7 operating system series to inform them about an important kernel security update.

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The What, Why and Wow! Behind the CoreOS Container Linux

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OS
Linux
Server

Unlike most Linux distributions, CoreOS doesn’t have a package manager. Instead it takes a page from Google’s ChromeOS and automates software updates to ensure better security and reliability of machines and containers running on clusters. Both operating system updates and security patches are regularly pushed to CoreOS Container Linux machines without sysadmin intervention.

You control how often patches are pushed using CoreUpdate, with its web-based interface. This enables you to control when your machines update, and how quickly an update is rolled out across your cluster.

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Linux vs. Windows Server OS Comparison

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OS
Linux
Microsoft

A comparison between Linux and Windows while selecting the server operating system is like being in stalemate while playing the chess game where the outcome is unpredictable. Various versions of the Microsoft—from Windows—and the Linux-based operating systems are available in plenty today. But deciding the best option is a tougher task, rather, finding the right solution that fits the organizational requirements is easier.

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Parrot Security OS Devs Mock systemd: It's an Immature Init System for GNU/Linux

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OS

We reported last week that the developers of the Parrot Security OS ethical hacking and penetration testing GNU/Linux distribution are evaluating a possible migration of their operating system from Debian GNU/Linux to Devuan GNU/Linux.

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Zorin OS 12 Lite Beta Adopts Xfce as Default Desktop Environment Instead of LXDE

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OS

Zorin Group is announcing today the release of a Beta version of the upcoming Zorin OS 12 Lite edition of the Ubuntu-based operating system, designed for old computers with low hardware specifications.

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ROSA R9 Linux OS Now Shipping with a Lightweight Edition Featuring LXQt Desktop

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OS
Linux

ROSA Labs is pleased to announce the availability of an LXQt edition of the recently released ROSA R9 GNU/Linux operating system, which can run on older computers with only 512 MB of RAM.

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Kodi-Based OpenELEC 8.0.4 Linux Media Center OS Released, Here Is What's New

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OS
Linux

The monthly stable update of the OpenELEC embedded Linux entertainment operating system for Raspberry Pi and other supported single-board computers has arrived, and it is now available for download or update.

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How to manage casual contributors to open source projects

Increasingly, people want to contribute to projects casually—when they want to, rather than adhering to a schedule. This is part of a broader trend of "episodic volunteering" noted by a wide range of volunteer organizations and governments. This has been attributed not only to changes in the workforce, which leave fewer people able to volunteer with less spare time to share, but also to changes in how people perceive the act of volunteering. It is no longer seen as a communal obligation, rather as a conditional activity in which the volunteer also receives benefits. Moreover, distributed revision-control systems and the network effects of GitHub, which standardize the process of making a contribution, make it easier for people to contribute casually to free/libre/open source software (FLOSS) projects. Read more

5 ways to invigorate education with Raspberry Pi

A couple of years ago, I was talking to PayPal senior director of software development Harper Reed at All Things Open in Raleigh, N.C., when he suggested that the best way to invigorate education would be to purchase Raspberry Pis en masse and put them in public libraries. Although many schools have made sizeable investments in classroom technology, those investments have done little to advance students' understanding of how the technology works. That's where the Raspberry Pi comes in, as it's the ideal vehicle to demonstrate the educational efficacy of open source software and open hardware in the classroom. Read more