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Endless OS Helps Tear Down Linux Wall

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OS
Reviews

The free version of Endless OS adheres to the free license policy. It includes preinstalled video and audio codecs that are free of patents. That can limit the types of files you can play. Non-included codecs are available for purchase at the Endless OS Store.

If you dislike managing frequent system updates and new release upgrades, you may have a special liking for Endless OS. As long as you have an Internet connection, the OS periodically checks for updates and automatically downloads and applies them in the background. You get a notification to restart.

Although this desktop design should be an ideal environment for touchscreens, Endless OS does not take to touch very well. This is a major feature weakness if you have a touchscreen laptop or desktop monitor.

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Sailfish OS 2.1.4 is now available to early access

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OS

After a few productive months of development, we are ready to release the next Sailfish OS update named Lapuanjoki to the early access group!

Lapuanjoki is named after the town of Lapua, located in Southern Ostrobothnia region, flowing from lake Sampalampi to the Gulf of Bothnia.

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Also: Jolla Pushes Out Sailfish OS 2.1.4 Into Early Access

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

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OS
LibO
  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler

    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.

  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler

    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4.

    This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.

  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark

    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018.

    That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office.

    The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.

Q4OS Makes Linux Easy for Everyone

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OS
Linux

Modern Linux distributions tend to target a variety of users. Some claim to offer a flavor of the open source platform that anyone can use. And, I’ve seen some such claims succeed with aplomb, while others fall flat. Q4OS is one of those odd distributions that doesn’t bother to make such a claim but pulls off the feat anyway.

So, who is the primary market for Q4OS? According to its website, the distribution is a:

“fast and powerful operating system based on the latest technologies while offering highly productive desktop environment. We focus on security, reliability, long-term stability and conservative integration of verified new features. System is distinguished by speed and very low hardware requirements, runs great on brand new machines as well as legacy computers. It is also very applicable for virtualization and cloud computing.”

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elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" Will Be Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Coming This Year

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OS
Ubuntu

According to the elementary OS developer, the next release of the Ubuntu-based operating system is getting a new versioning scheme, updated kernel and graphics stacks, as well as the latest GTK+ technologies.

We already knew that "Juno" would be the codename of the next major elementary OS release, but it now looks like the version number was changed from 0.5 to 5.0, which, apparently, won't mean anything to regular users.

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Qubes OS Security-Focused Operating System Now Supports Librem Linux Laptops

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OS
Security

Last year, Purism started shipping coreboot-enabled Librem laptops, and it received some interesting feedback from customers who bought them and attempted to install early release candidate images of the Qubes 4.0 operating system, reporting that the Qubes OS installer complained about IOMMU support.

Apparently, IOMMU support wasn't available in Intel's Skylake processors that powered Purism's Librem laptops, but it's supported by the coreboot firmware, formerly known as LinuxBIOS, so the company had to update its laptops to the latest coreboot release, which lets users install Qubes OS 4.0 without any warnings.

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Qubes OS 4.0-rc4 has been released!

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OS
Security

We’re pleased to announce the fourth release candidate for Qubes 4.0! This release contains important safeguards against the Spectre and Meltdown attacks, as well as bug fixes for many of the issues discovered in the previous release candidate. A full list of the Qubes 4.0 issues closed so far is available here. Further details about this release, including full installation instructions, are available in the Qubes 4.0 release notes. The new installation image is available on the Downloads page.

As always, we’re immensely grateful to our community of testers for taking the time to discover and report bugs. Thanks to your efforts, we’re able to fix these bugs before the final release of Qubes 4.0. We encourage you to continue diligently testing this fourth release candidate so that we can work together to improve Qubes 4.0 before the stable release.

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Oracle Releases Solaris 11.4 Public Beta With GNOME 3 Desktop, Secure UEFI Boot

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OS
GNOME

After all the Oracle/Solaris controversies last year, it's good to see Oracle today releasing their first public beta of Solaris 11.4 as an update to the Solaris 11 operating system.

As previously reported, Solaris 11.4 has switched finally from the GNOME 2 desktop to now using the GNOME Shell. Solaris 11.4 Beta is shipping with GNOME 3.24 components for those doing a desktop installation.

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Original: It’s alive!

Google’s Fuchsia OS on the Pixelbook: It works! It actually works!

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OS
Google
Reviews

Google currently has two OSes on the market: Android and Chrome OS. The company is never one to leave a successful product alone in the marketplace, though, so it's also developing a third operating system called "Fuchsia." When we last checked in on the experimental OS in May 2017, calling it an "OS" was a bit of a stretch. We only got the system UI up and running on top of Android, where it then functioned like an app. The UI offered a neat multi-window system, but mostly it was just a bunch of placeholder graphics. Nothing worked.

It has been hard to check in on Fuchsia since. The Fuchsia system UI, which was written with a cross-platform SDK called "Flutter," quickly shut down the Android (and iOS) compatible builds. Fuchsia has a Vulkan-based graphics stack, and no emulator supports the new-ish graphics API. The only way to get Fuchsia up and running again was with actual hardware, and the only supported devices were Intel NUC PCs from 2015 and the Acer Switch Alpha 12 laptop.

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Linspire 8.0 and Freespire 4.0 Slated for Release in mid-December 2018

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OS
Linux

If you think the release of Linspire 7.0 and Freespire 3.0 were just a one-off, think again because we're now in possession of the release roadmap for both operating systems, and it looks like we should be able to get our hands on the next major releases at the end of the year. But, in the meanwhile, we'll be able to test a lot of the beta versions for both Freespire 4.0 and Linspire 8.0, as well as to enjoy new incremental versions of current releases.

"Today we are releasing the release schedule and roadmap for Linspire and Freespire. These dates are not set in stone and there may be some alterations due to holidays and development mishaps. While the Freespire beta's will be available publicly the Linspire beta's will be available to subscription holders and insiders," says Roberto J. Dohnert in today's announcement.

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More in Tux Machines

Review: BunsenLabs Helium

I have got a bit of soft spot for Openbox. I like how minimalist it is and how it hardly uses any system resources - according to my Conky panel BunsenLabs was using just over 200MB of RAM when idle. BunsenLabs provides a system that is usable out of the box but which can be tweaked any way you want. For this review I made the system cleaner and leaner but I could have gone in the opposite direction and create a desktop with conkies, panels and docks all over the place. DistroWatch's slogan, "put the fun back into computing", very much applies to BunsenLabs. In short, this is a distro I could easily use as my daily driver. My only concern would be the project's long term future. BunsenLabs Helium was released almost a year after Debian Stretch was released and then there is the worrying fact that Openbox doesn't work under Wayland, which is getting ever closer to replacing Xorg. BunsenLabs has got a sound community though, so I very much hope this distro will be around for many years to come. Read more

KaOS 2018.06

Just days after Plasma 5.13.1 was announced can you already see it on this new release. Highlights of Plasma 5.13 include optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance, and less memory consumption. System Settings with KDE’s Kirigami framework gives the pages a slick new look. KWin gained much-improved effects for blur and desktop switching. Wayland work continued, with the return of window rules, the use of high priority EGL Contexts, and initial support for screencasts and desktop sharing. And a tech preview of GTK global menu integration. Read more

8 reasons to use the Xfce Linux desktop environment

The Xfce desktop is thin and fast with an overall elegance that makes it easy to figure out how to do things. Its lightweight construction conserves both memory and CPU cycles. This makes it ideal for older hosts with few resources to spare for a desktop. However, Xfce is flexible and powerful enough to satisfy my needs as a power user. I've learned that changing to a new Linux desktop can take some work to configure it as I want—with all of my favorite application launchers on the panel, my preferred wallpaper, and much more. I have changed to new desktops or updates of old ones many times over the years. It takes some time and a bit of patience. I think of it like when I've moved cubicles or offices at work. Someone carries my stuff from the old office to the new one, and I connect my computer, unpack the boxes, and place their contents in appropriate locations in my new office. Moving into the Xfce desktop was the easiest move I have ever made. Read more

Programming: Go, Bugs and LLVM

  • 3 ways to copy files in Go
    This article will show you how to copy a file in the Go programming language. Although there are more than three ways to copy a file in Go, this article will present the three most common ways: using the io.Copy() function call from the Go library; reading the input file all at once and writing it to another file; and copying the file in small chunks using a buffer.
  • The life cycle of a software bug
    During the process of testing, bugs are reported to the development team. Quality assurance testers describe the bug in as much detail as possible, reporting on their system state, the processes they were undertaking, and how the bug manifested itself. Despite this, some bugs are never confirmed; they may be reported in testing but can never be reproduced in a controlled environment. In such cases they may not be resolved but are instead closed. It can be difficult to confirm a computer bug due to the wide array of platforms in use and the many different types of user behavior. Some bugs only occur intermittently or under very specific situations, and others may occur seemingly at random. Many people use and interact with open source software, and many bugs and issues may be non-repeatable or may not be adequately described. Still, because every user and developer also plays the role of quality assurance tester, at least in part, there is a good chance that bugs will be revealed.
  • LLVM's OpenMP Offloads Liboffload Into Oblivion
    The liboffload library has been dropped from LLVM's OpenMP repository. Liboffload is/was the Intel runtime library for offloading and geared for supporting the Xeon Phi co-processors. But liboffload within LLVM hasn't been receiving updates, it wasn't properly integrated within the LLVM build system, and unfortunately Xeon Phi co-processors appear to be discontinued. The liboffload library has also confused some with LLVM's libomptarget library for OpenMP support that is in much better shape.