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It's Time To Pay Attention To Intel's Clear Linux OS Project

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OS
Linux

In Intel's own words: "Clear Linux OS is an open source, rolling release Linux distribution optimized for performance and security, from the Cloud to the Edge, designed for customization and manageability."

In more specific terms, Clear Linux is built from scratch atop the GNOME desktop environment, and it's highly tuned for Intel platforms, with all performance optimizations enabled by default. Those optimizations occur across the entire stack: kernel, libraries, middleware layers, frameworks and runtime.

Clear Linux has Flatpak support out of the box, and an included software store with more than 4000 applications and bundles. So yes, if you wanted to treat this as a traditional desktop workstation, I don't see any major obstacles to doing that aside from a slight learning curve with regards to Intel's custom "swupd" package manager.

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Solaris: OmniOS CE and OpenIndiana Hipster 2019.04

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OS
  • OmniOS Community Edition r151030 LTS

    The OmniOS Community Edition Association is proud to announce the general availability of OmniOS - r151030.

    OmniOS is published according to a 6-month release cycle, r151030 LTS takes over from r151028, published in November 2018; and since it is a LTS release it also takes over from r151022. The r151030 LTS release will be supported for 3 Years. It is the first LTS release published by the OmniOS CE Association since taking over the reins from OmniTI in 2017. The next LTS release is scheduled for May 2021. The old stable r151026 release is now end-of-life. See the release schedule for further details.

  • Solaris/Illumos-Based OmniOS Ships New LTS Release With Better Hardware Support

    While open-source operating system projects derived from the former "OpenSolaris" code now maintained by the Illumos community aren't exactly prolific these days, one of the projects that does continue cranking through and seeing commercial success as well is OmniOS. OmniOS r151030 was released this week in its "Community Edition" flavor with various improvements.

    OmniOS CE r151030 is the latest six-month update to this OpenSolaris-derived operating system and will be supported for three years as the first LTS release managed by the OmniOS CE Association.

  • OpenIndiana Hipster 2019.04 Brings MATE 1.22, More Python 3 Porting

    It seems to be the season of open-source Solaris operating system updates... In addition to a new OmniOS LTS release for that Illumos-derived platform, OpenIndiana Hipster has issued its newest quarterly update.

    OpenIndiana Hipster 2019.04 is available as the latest snapshot of this operating system that traces back to the once promising Sun OpenSolaris. With OpenIndiana 2019.04 there is an updated Firefox ESR package, VirtualBox packages are now available including for the guest components, the default MATE desktop pulled in its 1.22 components, IPS has seen updates, and some OpenIndiana applications have been ported from Python 2 and GTK2 over to Python 3 and GTK3.

First smartphone with /e/ OS!

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OS
Android

After a lilttle than 1 year of hard work, I’m very proud to announce that the first fully ungoogled Android smartphone on the market will be ready to ship in next June!

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Also: I got my slice of Pie ... Android Pie - What's up?

Sailfish OS Hossa is now available

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OS
Linux

It has been a long time since my previous blog post, but I thought it was time to give a bit more tech savvy update for a change. I want to open up a bit more in details how things go and the reasoning behind those actions. So, without further a due, let’s proceed.

We are pleased to announce the new 3.0.3 update, which is named after Hossa National Park. Hossa National Park is located in North-East Finland in the region of Kainuu. The park is home to Värikallio, an area that has some of the most important rock paintings in Finland. The paintings tell the story of the Stone Age men that used to be located in the area, and used the water routes next to the stone wall.

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POP!_OS Makes Classic GNOME Simpler to Use

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OS
GNOME
Reviews

The performance of POP!_OS is nearly indistinguishable from GNOME iterations in other Linux distros I have tried. The developers' customized tweaking is what makes the difference.

Presumably, running POP!_OS on an optimized System76 hardware will give you better performance than just installing the distro on your existing hardware. Comparing your existing machine specs to what is built into a new System76 computer should give you a clue to how much of a performance boost you can expect.

Either way, try out the live session on your current computer. Then weigh the potential benefits of a new computer if you like the customized version of the GNOME desktop.

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Wear OS getting a new update with “Tiles” feature

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OS

Google is adding a new piece of feature to the Wear OS, once again bringing back an ounce of hope on the dying platform. The new feature makes navigation through the most-used functions of the watch much easier. Google is calling this bite-sized feature Tiles.

Tiles is pretty much the same swipe feature that Google introduced for the Google Fit, Google Assistant, notifications, and quick settings last year. Earlier, swiping down from the watch face would bring up quick settings, swiping up would bring the notifications, swiping right showed the feed from the Google Assistant and swiping left showed data from Google Fit. Now with the new addition, you can keep swiping left to access more information, like the weather forecast, news headlines, calendar events, heart rate, and more.

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GNU Guix Reaches Big 1

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OS
GNU
  • GNU Guix 1.0.0 released

    We are excited to announce the release of GNU Guix version 1.0.0!

    The release comes with ISO-9660 installation images, a virtual machine image, and with tarballs to install the package manager on top of your GNU/Linux distro, either from source or from binaries. Guix users can update by running guix pull.

  • GNU Guix 1.0.0 released
  • GNU Guix 1.0.0 released
  • GNU Guix 1.0.0 released
  • GNU Guix 1.0 System Distribution & Transactional Package Manager Released

    After seven years of development and more than forty-thousand commits, GNU Guix 1.0 has been released. Guix as a refresher is the transactional package manager that can be used atop other Linux distributions while the Guix System Distribution also serves as its own GNU/Linux flavor.

    On the package manager side, GNU Guix 1.0 now supports a -v option to increase verbosity of outputs, various other new sub-commands/options, and other enhancements.

Latest From Haiku OS

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OS
  • Haiku monthly activity report - 03 and 04/2019

    Hi there! We're back for monthly (or almost) reports! I was at the JDLL in early april, and while preparing for that I didn't have time to write a report, and no one else did it. So here we go with a 2 month report, prepare for something a little longer than usual. This report covers hrev52945-hrev53094.

  • Haiku Continues Progress With Its New NVMe Driver, BIOS/UEFI Fixes & More

    The Haiku operating system that continues to be the open-source project living on in the traditions of BeOS is continuing to advance its modern hardware support and application compatibility.

    As covered last month, the Haiku operating system finally features an NVMe storage driver for supporting today's speedy solid-state drives. This NVMe SSD driver for Haiku has continued to evolve in recent weeks.

MakuluLinux Core OS Is Dressed to Impress

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OS
Linux
Reviews

I have charted the progress of Core's development through sometimes daily ISO releases over the last few months. I can attest to the near constant revisions and design tweaks Raymer has applied.

The more I used Core, the better choice it became over its LinDoz and Flash kin. That, of course, is purely a personal observation. But the features I loved in the other two MakuluLinux options either were even better when integrated into Core, or were surpassed by the Core-only innovations.

MakuluLinux Core's rebuilt Xfce desktop is so well tweaked it looks and feels like something new.

Given the amount of forking Raymer did to Xfce, he could call the desktop something new. For me, referring to it as "the new Core desktop" makes perfect sense.

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Chrome OS 75 brings VPN support to Linux apps

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OS
Linux

Google has finally added VPN support for Linux apps on Chrome OS. Chrome OS 75.0.3770.10, which is currently in Dev channel, enables the support in Crostini. Both the native Linux VPN for Chrome OS and Android VPNs are supported, though the former is still a work-in-progress.

In addition to VPN support, the latest release for Chrome OS also contains a few bug fixes, as well as new features. Chrome OS 75 is expected to hit the Stable channel in mid-June.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle launches completely autonomous operating system

Together, these two solutions provide automated patching, updates, and tuning. This includes 100 percent automatic daily security updates to the Linux kernel and user space library. In addition, patching can be done while the system is running, instead of a sysadmin having to take systems down to patch them. This reduces downtime and helps to eliminate some of the friction between developers and IT, explained Coekaerts. Read more

Software: Zotero, PulseCaster and Qt Port of SFXR

  • Zotero and LibreOffice

    If you’re working with LibreOffice and need to create a bibliography, this software makes it simple to manage your citations. You can tell how few people use LibreOffice’s Bibliography Database by the fact that a bug that would take 10 minutes to fix has survived since 2002. Instead, those who need bibliographies or citations rely on other software such as Zotero, which can be integrated into LibreOffice with an extension. That robust bug is that the Citation Format in the database table is called the Short Name in the input fields. Even more confusing, the examples give an arbitrary name, when to work with the citation insertion tool in Insert | Table of Contents and Index | Insert Bibliography Entry, it should in a standard form, such as (Byfield: 2016) for the MLA format. Add the fact that a single database is used for all files – an absurdity in these memory-rich days – and the neglect of the Bibliography Database is completely understandable.

  • PulseCaster 0.9 released!

    For starters, PulseCaster is now ported to Python 3. I used Python 3.6 and Python 3.7 to do the porting. Nothing in the code should be particular to either version, though. But you’ll need to have Python 3 installed to use it, as most Linux bistros do these days. Another enhancement is that PulseCaster now relies on the excellent pulsectl library for Python, by George Filipkin and Mike Kazantsev. Hats off to them for doing a great job, which allowed me to remove many, many lines of code from this release. Also, due the use of PyGObject3 in this release, there are numerous improvements that make it easier for me to hack on. Silly issues with the GLib mainloop and other entrance/exit stupidity are hopefully a bit better now. Also, the code for dealing with temporary files is now a bit less ugly. I still want to do more work on the overall design and interface, and have ideas. I’ve gotten way better at time management since the last series of releases and hope to do some of this over the USA holiday season this late fall and winter (but no promises).

  • SFXR Qt 1.3.0

    I just released version 1.3.0 of SFXR Qt, my Qt port of the SFXR sound effect generator.

today's howtos

Programming Leftovers

  • post modern C tooling - draft

    Some of the C++ people have pulled off one of the cleverest and sneakiest tricks ever. They required 'modern' C99 and C11 features in 'recent' C++ standards. Microsoft has famously still clung onto some 80s version of C with their compiler for the longest time. So it's been a decade of hacks for people writing portable code in C. For a while I thought we'd be stuck in the 80s with C89 forever. However, now that some C99 and C11 features are more widely available in the Microsoft compiler, we can use these features in highly portable code (but forget about C17/C18 ISO/IEC 9899:2018/C2X stuff!!).

  • Reading and Writing YAML to a File in Python

    In this tutorial, we're going to learn how to use the YAML library in Python 3. YAML stands for Yet Another Markup Language. In recent years it has become very popular for its use in storing data in a serialized manner for configuration files. Since YAML essentially is a data format, the YAML library is quite brief, as the only functionality required of it is the ability to parse YAML formatted files. In this article we will start with seeing how data is stored in a YAML file, followed by loading that data into a Python object. Lastly, we will learn how to store a Python object in a YAML file. So, let's begin. Before we move further, there are a few prerequisites for this tutorial. You should have a basic understanding of Python's syntax, and/or have done at least beginner level programming experience with some other language. Other than that, the tutorial is quite simple and easy to follow for beginners.

  • Python Multiple Inheritance (with Examples)

    In this tutorial, we’ll describe Python Multiple Inheritance concept and explain how to use it in your programs. We’ll also cover multilevel inheritance, the super() function, and focus on the method resolution order. In the previous tutorial, we have gone through Python Class and Python (Single) Inheritance. There, you have seen that a child class inherits from a base class. However, Multiple Inheritance is a feature where a class can derive attributes and methods from more than one base classes. Hence, it creates a high level of complexity and ambiguity and known as the diamond problem in the technical world. We’ll be taking up this problem later in this tutorial.

  • Adding Methods Retroactively

    Imagine you have a "shapes" library. We have a Circle class, a Square class, etc. A Circle has a radius, a Square has a side, and maybe Rectangle has height and width. The library already exists: we do not want to change it. However, we do want to add an area calculation. If this was our library, we would just add an area method, so that we can call shape.area(), and not worry about what the shape is.