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Tails 4.11 is Out With Major Security Vulnerability Fixes

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OS
Linux
Security
Web

The Tails (The Amnesic Incognito Live System) team recently announced the release of their latest version, Tails 4.11 with several major security vulnerability fixes added on top the numerous security holes fixed in Tails 4.10.

The Debian-based, live distro with the sole purpose of providing users with Internet anonymity by directing Internet traffic through the Tor network and at the same time, providing built-in tools for a secure work environment just received its latest release which has the primary focus of squashing bugs and toughening security.

The distro has received fixes to numerous major security issues that existed in earlier versions and the developers strongly encourage users to upgrade their versions to the latest immediately.

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/e/OS redefines the mobile operating system paradigm for a more sustainable world

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OS

Two years ago, /e/OS was envisioned as a fully deGoogled mobile operating system (OS) and associated online services that focus on personal data privacy. That initial vision is growing, and the result is that in addition to being a great alternative to Apple and Google, it is progressively paving the way to a better, more frugal, and more sustainable IT world for everyone...

In the initial project description I wrote at the end of 2017 (Part1, Part2, Part3), I announced that the aim was to build an alternative mobile ecosystem that would be as easy to use as iOS and Android, while being more respectful of my personal data, and in particular be fully deGoogled.

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Default window manager switched to CTWM in NetBSD-current

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OS
BSD

For more than 20 years, NetBSD has shipped X11 with the "classic" default window manager of twm. However, it's been showing its age for a long time now.

In 2015, ctwm was imported, but after that no progress was made. ctwm is a fork of twm with some extra features - the primary advantages are that it's still incredibly lightweight, but highly configurable, and has support for virtual desktops, as well as a NetBSD-compatible license and ongoing development. Thanks to its configuration options, we can provide a default experience that's much more usable to people experienced with other operating systems.

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Legacy: Dennis Ritchie's Lost Dissertation and FTP Fadeout

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OS
  • Discovering Computer Legend Dennis Ritchie's Lost Dissertation
  • FTP Fadeout

    Here’s a small piece of news you may have missed while you were trying to rebuild your entire life to fit inside your tiny apartment at the beginning of the COVID crisis: Because of the way that the virus shook up just about everything, Google skipped the release of Chrome version 82. Who cares, you think? Well, users of FTP, or the File Transfer Protocol. During the pandemic, Google delayed its plan to kill FTP, and now that things have settled to some degree, Google recently announced that it is going back for the kill with Chrome version 86, which deprecates the support once again, and will kill it for good in Chrome 88. (Mozilla announced similar plans for Firefox, citing security reasons and the age of the underlying code.) It is one of the oldest protocols the mainstream [Internet] supports—it turns 50 next year—but those mainstream applications are about to leave it behind. Today’s Tedium talks about history of FTP, the networking protocol that has held on longer than pretty much any other.

Top 10 New Features of Deepin 20

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OS

Deepin released its latest version Deepin V20. It’s beautiful and more stable than before. It has been a whopping five months since we wrote about the Deepin 20 beta and the new features it brought along. After a long wait, Deepin V20 has ditched the beta status and is now out for the masses.

Deepin V20 developers seem to have focused more on the overall look and feel of this impressive open-source GNU/Linux distribution. There has even been a conversation that Deepin V20 looks like the New macOS Big Sur. Or is it the other way round?

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What To Do After Installing deepin 20 GNU/Linux 20

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OS
GNU
Linux

Everything is fun with Deepin Twenty. If you are new to deepin, this article helps you to do things with your new computer in deepin ways. Check it out!

Tuxmath and Friends: do you know that deepin brings complete set of educational applications? Starting for kids and kindergarten ages, we see Tuxmath - Tuxpaint - TuxTyping available. For middle school upwards, we see KAlgebra - KAlzium - Marble available. For universities and researchers, we see Scilab - GNU R - LaTeX available. get them all from App Store.

Ethercalc and Friends: if you're teacher here is Ethercalc you can use as simple online students presence form. It is a spreadsheet just like LibreOffice Calc or Microsoft Excel but accessible online. You can make one freely at Disroot. Similarly, you can also use Etherpad the word processor you can access freely at Disroot as well. If you need free and reliable video calls, I shared my experiences in I Teach With Jitsi last month you can learn from. Quickly access Jitsi for free at the official site.

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Deepin OS 20 – Innovation is Ongoing

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OS

Deepin OS is among the most awesome operating systems in the world, period. The Debian-based distro has successfully won the hearts of everybody that I know has used it for over a day and its latest release, Deepin 20 (1002) brings so many improvements I could have a field day reviewing them all.

To summarize the changes in this latest version, deepin ships with a unified design style and a redesigned desktop environment that makes its brand look more consistent across its updated preinstalled applications.

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TechNexion Unveils EDM and AXON SoM’s Powered by NXP i.MX8M Plus SoC

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OS
Android
Linux

The company offers standard support for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, Linux-built Yocto Project, and Android 10, as well as extended support for FreeRTOS. If it feels like you’ve seen EDM-G-IMX8M-PLUS module before it’s because it should be the one found in the upcoming Wandboard 8MPLUS SBC.

There’s will be other development kits based on existing AXON/EDM baseboards including AXON-PI Raspberry Pi-like starter board, or the full-featured AXON-WIZARD and EDM-WIZARD evaluation boards. Marcel vandenHeuvel, TechNexion’s CEO, gives an overview of the AXON i.MX8M Plus modules and baseboard, and shows a Yocto 3.0 Linux demo with dual displays.

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Oracle Solaris and Java Update

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OS
Development
  • Oracle Solaris: Update to the Continuous Delivery Model

    The Oracle Solaris 11 Operating System (OS) is synonymous with three words: consistent, reliable and secure. With Oracle Solaris OS being designed to deliver a consistent platform to run your enterprise applications, Oracle Solaris has become the most trusted solution for running both modern and legacy applications on the newest system hardware while providing the latest innovations. Oracle Solaris combines the power of industry standard security features, unique security and anti-malware capabilities, and compliance management tools for low risk application deployments and cloud infrastructure. In its most recent avatar, Oracle Solaris 11.4 has already provided our customers with the latest features and observability tools and the list of new features in build grows with every SRU release.

  • Oracle To Stick With Solaris "11.4" For Continuous Delivery SRU Releases

    With no new indications of Solaris 12 or Solaris 11.next and given the past layoffs and previous announcements from Oracle, today's statement that Solaris 11.4 will remain as their continuous delivery model with monthly SRU releases come as little surprise.

    Tanmay Dhuri who has been at Oracle since April as the Solaris product manager wrote today on the Oracle Solaris blog about their continuous delivery model. Basically it's reiterating that Solaris 11.4 will be sticking to a continuous delivery model moving forward. This comes after Solaris 11.4 turning two years old and seeing monthly SRU releases during that time. These monthly releases are designed to offer up timely security fixes and other mostly small updates to Oracle Solaris.

  • Java 15 Goes GA as the Language Turns 25

    Oracle today announced the general availability release of Java 15 during the opening keynote of its Developer Live conference, the online version of the company's annual CodeOne and OpenWorld events, underway this week.

    The latest Java Development Kit (JDK) delivers new functionality, preview features now finalized, incubating features in preview, the continued modernization of the existing code, and a host of bug fixes and the deprecation of outdated functionality.

    This release comes as Java turns 25, noted Georges Saab, vice president of development for Oracle's Java Platform Group, in a statement.

  • Solve a real-world problem using Java

    As I wrote in the first two articles in this series, I enjoy solving small problems by writing small programs in different languages, so I can compare the different ways they approach the solution. The example I'm using in this series is dividing bulk supplies into hampers of similar value to distribute to struggling neighbors in your community, which you can read about in the first article in this series.

    In the first article, I solved this problem using the Groovy programming language, which is like Python in many ways, but syntactically it's more like C and Java. In the second article, I solved it in Python with a very similar design and effort, which demonstrates the resemblance between the languages.

    Now I'll try it in Java.

Sculpt OS release 20.08

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OS

  • Sculpt OS release 20.08

    The new version of Sculpt OS is based on the latest Genode release 20.08. In particular, it incorporates the redesigned GUI stack to the benefit of quicker boot times, improved interactive responsiveness, and better pixel output quality. It also removes the last traces of the noux runtime. Fortunately, these massive under-the-hood changes do not disrupt the user-visible surface of Sculpt. Most users will feel right at home.

    Upon closer inspection, there are couple of new features to appreciate. The CPU-affinity of each component can now be restricted interactively by the user, components can be easily restarted via a click on a button, font-size changes have an immediate effect now, and the VESA driver (used when running Sculpt in a virtual machine) can dynamically change the screen resolution.

  • Sculpt OS 20.08 Released With Redesigned GUI Stack

    Building off the recent Genode OS 20.08 operating system framework release is now Sculpt OS 20.08 as the open-source project's general purpose operating system attempt.

    Sculpt OS 20.08 pulls in the notable Genode 20.08 changes like the redesigned GUI stack with better responsiveness and other benefits. It also includes the ability to run the Falk web browser as the first Chromium-based browser on Genode/Sculpt.

    Sculpt OS is Genode's effort around creating a general purpose OS but for right now is still largely limited to developers, hobbyists, and those wishing to tinker around with new operating systems.

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Android Leftovers

Lubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) BETA testing

We are pleased to announce that the beta images for Lubuntu 20.10 have been released! While we have reached the bugfix-only stage of our development cycle, these images are not meant to be used in a production system. We highly recommend joining our development group or our forum to let us know about any issues. Read more

Plasma and the systemd startup

Landing in master, plasma has an optional new startup method to launch and manage all our KDE/Plasma services via a system --user interface rather than the current boot scripts. This will be available in Plasma 5.21. It is currently opt-in, off by default. I hope to make it the default where available after more testing and feedback, but it is important to stress that the current boot-up method will exist and be supported into the future. A lot of work was put into splitting and tidying so the actual amount of duplication in the end result is quite small and manageable. Read more