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Hands-On with System76's New Installer for Ubuntu-Based Pop!_OS Linux 18.04

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OS
Ubuntu

System76's engineers worked with the elementary OS team on the new Pop!_OS Linux installer, which is now finally available for public testing. Today we take a first look at the new graphical installer in Pop!_OS Linux 18.04, so we can show you how it stands compared to other GNU/Linux distributions.

Pop!_OS Linux 18.04 LTS is available to download only for 64-bit systems with either Intel/AMD or Nvidia GPUs. The live ISO images can be either installed on your local disk drive or used as is, directly from the bootable medium. When running the ISO, you'll first be asked to select the system language and keyboard layout.

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New indie project could lead to a bunch of Wear OS smartwatch competitors

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OS
Android

Soon, there could be a number of indie operating systems for your smartwatch, sprouting from an open-source code project launched last week. Indie developers making budget smartwatches can now use starting code from Project OpenWatch to craft their Android-based operating systems. The OpenWatch project is live as of last week. It was released by Blocks, the same company behind the forthcoming Blocks modular smartwatch.

Blocks’ head of engineering, Karl Taylor, said that the project is meant to “open up the smartwatch OS space to the open source community in a bid to loosen the stranglehold on the industry by other, essentially proprietary operating system.” He named Google’s Wear OS (formerly Android Wear) and Apple’s watchOS as the two major operating systems that currently dominate smartwatches. While there are a number of options for hardware companies to choose from, Taylor said none of them provided the flexibility companies need to truly customize a watch’s hardware.

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Qubes OS 4.0 has been released!

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OS

This release delivers on the features we promised in our announcement of Qubes 4.0-rc1, with some course corrections along the way, such as the switch from HVM to PVH for most VMs in response to Meltdown and Spectre. For more details, please see the full Release Notes. The Qubes 4.0 installation image is available on the Downloads page, along with the complete Installation Guide.

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System76 Adds Nvidia Titan V GPU Support to Its Ubuntu-Based Pop!_OS Linux OS

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OS
Ubuntu

The company is currently working hard on Pop!_OS Linux 18.04, a release that's based on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system and built around the GNOME desktop environment. One essential feature of the next Pop!_OS Linux release appears to be support for Nvidia's Titan V GPUs.

"We now have support for the NVIDIA Titan V, one of the most powerful GPUs on the market today! One of the value adds we do as a company is the ability to quickly incorporate support for new hardware. It’s available in our latest ISO if you want to check it out," said System76 in their latest blog announcement.

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Latest on webOS

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OS
Linux
OSS

LG releases webOS Open Source Edition, looks to expand webOS usage

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OS
OSS

LG’s smart TVs ship with an operating system called webOS, which is the latest version of an operating system that was developed by Palm to run on phones, acquired by HP to use with tablets, and eventually sold to LG, which is still using it today.

But now LG wants to expand the adoption of webOS and the company is working with the South Korean government to solicit business proposals from other companies interested in using webOS.

LG has also released a webOS Open Source Edition version of the operating system.

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Don't want Microsoft forcing Edge on you? Switch from Windows 10 to Linux with Zorin OS 12.3!

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OS
Linux

I am sick and tired of technology companies like Microsoft thinking they can impose their will on consumers. Just today, the company made a startling announcement -- it will now force links from the Windows Mail app to open in its own Edge web browser. In other words, whether you like it or not, even if Edge isn't your default browser, it will still be used for opening links from emails. This is unacceptable, and when combined with all of the other Windows 10 calamities, users should consider switching operating systems immediately.

Since macOS requires you to buy an entirely new computer from Apple, a Linux-based operating system is probably your best bet. By using Linux, you can finally reclaim your computer as your own -- not Microsoft's. Today, version 12.3 of Zorin OS is released, and it is the perfect OS to replace Windows 10. Hell, it can even run Windows programs (including Microsoft Office) with the help of the pre-installed and pre-configured Wine 3.

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Updated Oracle Roadmap Points To Post-11.4 Solaris Release Around 2020

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OS

Oracle published a SPARC and Solaris road-map updated for March 2018.

By now you should know about Solaris 11.4 that is currently in public beta.

But their March 2018 road-map update now indicates a "Solaris11.Next" for H2'2018 or H1'2020. Note that it's a "11.Next" and no mention of Solaris 12. It's still not clear if a Solaris 12 will happen given all the rumors following the mass layoffs at Oracle over the past number of months, but at least for now it's looking like it might be a Solaris 11.5 release around the end of next year or in early 2020.

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Meet Endless OS, a lightweight Linux distro

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OS

I'm always on the lookout for open source software that works well in educational settings. Recently I decided to check out Endless OS, a lightweight, Linux-based operating system with a customized desktop environment forked from GNOME 3.

The operating system was developed by Endless Computer to power its inexpensive computers for developing countries where widespread internet availability isn't a given. In 2016, Endless made the OS available for anyone to use, rather than only on its hardware.

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elementary OS Juno Is All About Beauty, Will Offer an Enhanced User Experience

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OS

Last month, we reported that elementary OS Juno would sport a new versioning scheme, which means that it will be versioned 5.0 instead of 0.5 as many users might have expected, and will be based on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system.

And now, we're finally getting a sneak peek at elementary OS Juno's new features, which include animated system panel indicators, new installer and Initial Setup wizard, updated default apps, nearly full HiDPI support, and the long-anticipated Night Light feature so you won't have eye strain.

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Mozilla: Rust, Security, Things Gateway, Firefox and More

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Fedora Workstation 28 Coming Soon

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Android Leftovers

Configuring local storage in Linux with Stratis

Configuring local storage is something desktop Linux users do very infrequently—maybe only once, during installation. Linux storage tech moves slowly, and many storage tools used 20 years ago are still used regularly today. But some things have improved since then. Why aren't people taking advantage of these new capabilities? This article is about Stratis, a new project that aims to bring storage advances to all Linux users, from the simple laptop single SSD to a hundred-disk array. Linux has the capabilities, but its lack of an easy-to-use solution has hindered widespread adoption. Stratis's goal is to make Linux's advanced storage features accessible. Read more