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OS

CoreOS, OCI Unveil Controversial Open Container Industry Standard

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OS
Server

CoreOS and the Open Container Initiative on Wednesday introduced image and runtime specifications largely based on Docker's image format technology.

However, OCI's decision to model the standard on Docker's de facto platform has raised questions. Some critics have argued for other options.

Version 1.0 provides a stable standard for application containers, according to Brandon Philips, CTO at CoreOS and chair of the OCI Technical Oversight Board.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - NeptuneOS

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OS
Reviews

We want a nice looking distro, don’t we? We want a distro that does the best work when it comes to stability. Don’t we? Here we come across NeptuneOS, a Linux distro based on Debian with KDE desktop environment. As we all know when it comes to stability, there are a lot of fewer distros that can match Debian. Also being based on Debian, the number of compatible software increase a lot.

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Endless OS 3.2 Adds Exciting Changes, a Refreshed Desktop, and More Offline Apps

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OS

Endless OS, the user-friendly, powerful, easy-to-use, and fast Linux-based operating system that comes preloaded with over 100 applications and tools, some of which work offline, has been updated to version 3.2.

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SolydXK 9 Linux OS Debuts Based on Debian 9 Stretch, Drops Raspberry Pi Support

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OS
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Debian-based SolydXK GNU/Linux distribution announced today the release and immediate availability for download of the SolydXK 9 operating system series.

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Open-source world resurrects Oracle-free Solaris project OmniOS

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OS
OSS

The open-source community has fought back and resurrected the development of OmniOS – an Oracle-free non-proprietary variant of Solaris, which had been shelved in April.

The development of OmniOS, a distribution of Illumos derived from Sun's open-source flavor of Solaris, was killed after five years of work by web applications biz OmniTI.

It was hoped OmniOS would be community-driven, simple to use, and fast to install and operate. However, the project was axed, as the project failed to make any cash out of the development and a community failed to emerge. Consequently all work stopped and support contracts were not renewed.

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How to Switch Between Chrome OS Stable, Beta, and Dev Channels on a Chromebook

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OS
HowTos

Google, like many other software developers, offers multiple development channels for their Chrome and Chrome OS products, and we'd like to show you today how easy is to switch between the Stable, Beta, and Dev channels.

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Parrot Security OS Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Now Based on Debian 10 "Buster"

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OS
Linux

The developers of the Parrot Security OS ethical hacking and penetration testing distro announced today the release and immediate availability for download of Parrot Security OS 3.7.

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Multics resurrected: proto-Unix now runs on Raspberry Pi or x86

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OS

Seminal time-sharing OS Multics - the Multiplexed Information and Computing Service - has been resurrected in a new simulator.

As The Register reported in 2011, Multics' sprang from MIT's decision to eschew an IBM mainframe, buy one from GE instead and write an OS for the machine. The operating system's source code was released in 2007, when we noted Multics' place in history as one of the first OSes “...to introduce concepts such as a hierarchical file system and dynamic linking. It was also the first to use the modern standard of per-process stacks in the kernal, with a separate stack for each security ring.”

As our own Liam Proven wrote back in 2011, “Unix was conceived as a sort of anti-Multics – 'Uni' versus 'multi', geddit? Unix was meant to be small and simple, as opposed to the large, complicated Multics. Consider the labyrinthine complexity of modern Unix and ponder what Multics must have been like.”

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Endless OS 3.2 Released, Rebases From GNOME Shell 3.8 To 3.22

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OS

Endless OS 3.2 is now available as the newest feature release for this GNOME-based Linux operating system that ships on the budget-friendly Endless Computers and is also available for free to all users.

Endless OS 3.2 has a number of underlying system updates including to its Linux kernel and Flatpak. On the UI side, there are big updates to its desktop with the re-basing process from GNOME Shell 3.8 to GNOME Shell 3.22. Moving forward, they intend to re-base their desktop changes much more often to allow for a smoother transition to using the newer GNOME code in their operating system.

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Also: Endless OS 3.2 released!

Ars spends too much time trying to work in Haiku, the BeOS successor

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OS

And it started with such promise, too. Haiku, the open-source successor to the late and lamented BeOS—that late, lamented operating system of the 1990s developed at Apple refugee Jean-Louis Gassée's Be Inc. BeOS was intended to compete with the "classic" Apple MacOS and with Microsoft Windows; by 1996, Gassée was jockeying to get Apple to acquire his company and make BeOS the basis of the next-generation Macintosh operating system. But then along came some guy named Steve Jobs, with a company called NeXT. And the rest, as they say, is history. Be Inc. was eventually acquired by another doomed company (Palm) and dissolved.

Haiku (initially "OpenBeOS," but changed because of copyright assertions by Palm) was launched in 2001 to create an operating system that was binary-compatible with applications written for the ill-fated BeOS. It uses the same C++ API as BeOS, but it is a re-implementation of that API, so it shares virtually none of the code of the original BeOS. As it has evolved, Haiku has taken two diverging roads: a 32-bit version that retains backward compatibility, and a 64-bit version that is more forward-looking but breaks backward compatibility because of compiler issues. That's because the 32-bit version, (like BeOS before it, is based on Gnu Compiler Collection (GCC) 2.

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More in Tux Machines

Total War: WARHAMMER

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important. So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal. Read more

Android Leftovers

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.7 Brings More Mitigations Against Spectre Flaws

Powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.14.50 kernel, Porteus Kiosk 4.7.0 is the second release of the operating system in 2018 and comes five months after version 4.6 to introduce more mitigations against the Spectre security vulnerabilities, though the next-gen Spectre flaws require microcode firmware updates for Intel CPUs. "Newly discovered "Spectre Next Generation" vulnerabilities require updated microcode from Intel which is not available yet. Please consider enabling automatic updates service for your kiosks to receive latest fixes and patches as soon as they become available," reads today's announcement. Read more