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Updated Oracle Roadmap Points To Post-11.4 Solaris Release Around 2020

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OS

Oracle published a SPARC and Solaris road-map updated for March 2018.

By now you should know about Solaris 11.4 that is currently in public beta.

But their March 2018 road-map update now indicates a "Solaris11.Next" for H2'2018 or H1'2020. Note that it's a "11.Next" and no mention of Solaris 12. It's still not clear if a Solaris 12 will happen given all the rumors following the mass layoffs at Oracle over the past number of months, but at least for now it's looking like it might be a Solaris 11.5 release around the end of next year or in early 2020.

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Meet Endless OS, a lightweight Linux distro

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OS

I'm always on the lookout for open source software that works well in educational settings. Recently I decided to check out Endless OS, a lightweight, Linux-based operating system with a customized desktop environment forked from GNOME 3.

The operating system was developed by Endless Computer to power its inexpensive computers for developing countries where widespread internet availability isn't a given. In 2016, Endless made the OS available for anyone to use, rather than only on its hardware.

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elementary OS Juno Is All About Beauty, Will Offer an Enhanced User Experience

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OS

Last month, we reported that elementary OS Juno would sport a new versioning scheme, which means that it will be versioned 5.0 instead of 0.5 as many users might have expected, and will be based on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system.

And now, we're finally getting a sneak peek at elementary OS Juno's new features, which include animated system panel indicators, new installer and Initial Setup wizard, updated default apps, nearly full HiDPI support, and the long-anticipated Night Light feature so you won't have eye strain.

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Next Tails Anonymous OS Release Will Be Powered by Linux Kernel 4.15, Tor 3.2.9

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OS
Linux

Tails 3.6 recently entered development, and a first release candidate image is now ready for public testing, suggesting the upcoming release will be the first to be powered by the latest Linux 4.15 kernel and ship with the most recent TOR 3.2.9 client/server technologies for accessing the dark web.

The upcoming Tails OS release is also the first to ship with screen locking support, which apparently can be used even without the root (system administrator) password. Also, there are several upgraded components included, starting with the tails-additional-softwares package, which no longer blocks the desktop.

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Exton|OS Claims to Be First Distribution Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Linux 4.16

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OS
Ubuntu

Tagged as Build 180301, the new Exton|OS release is based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and features the lightweight and modern Budgie desktop environment created by the Solus devs. Budgie 10.4 is on-board this release, which comes with the renowned Calamares universal installer framework by default.

According to the developer, Exton|OS is now fully compatible with the software repositories of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, which means that users can install any upstream package they need. Also, Arne Exton claims Exton|OS would be the first GNU/Linux distro to be based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), due for release on April 26, 2018.

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What's New in Qubes 4

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OS
Security

I've been using Qubes as my primary desktop for more than two years, and I've written about it previously in my Linux Journal column, so I was pretty excited to hear that Qubes was doing a refactor of its own in the new 4.0 release. As with most refactors, this one caused some past features to disappear throughout the release candidates, but starting with 4.0-rc4, the release started to stabilize with a return of most of the features Qubes 3.2 users were used to. That's not to say everything is the same. In fact, a lot has changed both on the surface and under the hood.

Although Qubes goes over all of the significant changes in its Qubes 4 changelog, instead of rehashing every low-level change, I want to highlight just some of the surface changes in Qubes 4 and how they might impact you whether you've used Qubes in the past or are just now trying it out.

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AsteroidOS Is an Open-Source and Privacy-Focused OS for Android Smartwatches

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OS
Gadgets

We'd like to introduce you today to AsteroidOS, an open-source and privacy-focused operating system for Android-powered smartwatches, designed as an alternative to Google's Android Wear.

Developed by Florent Revest, AsteroidOS was first introduced three years ago as an embedded Linux distribution built using the OpenEmbedded build automation framework and cross-compile environment on top of the Linux kernel and the systemd init system.

The operating system is using various mobile Linux middleware technologies like machine check exception (MCE) and lipstick, which were originally developed for Nemo Mobile or Mer. Its graphical user interface is entirely written with the Qt5 application framework.

Apps are written in QML using the cross-platform Qt Creator IDE and the current release of AsteroidOS comes with a set of default apps including an agenda, an alarm clock, a timer, a stopwatch, a calculator, a music controller, a weather forecast app, as well as a settings app.

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Jolla announces Sailfish 3, with support for crypto-services and more

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OS

The Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2018 is at full swing in Barcelona and we’ve already seen a number of new devices being introduced. One that has caught our attention is probably Android 8 Oreo running Samsung flagship, the Galaxy S9. However, Android isn’t the only mobile OS catching some media buzz at the mega event. Finnish company Jolla also announced the third version of its mobile platform, Sailfish OS.

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Chrome OS to support running Linux software in virtual machines

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OS
Linux

The idea of a fusion of Android and Chrome OS might not be totally dead but is, instead, taking on a different form. And that form comes in Chrome OS’ ability to run almost any kind of software from any OS, officially or otherwise. A recently spotted change to the Chromium source seems to imply that, in just a few months, Chromebooks might officially support running Linux software, considerably expanding the number of possible uses these “cloud” machines can have.

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Endless OS Helps Tear Down Linux Wall

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OS
Reviews

The free version of Endless OS adheres to the free license policy. It includes preinstalled video and audio codecs that are free of patents. That can limit the types of files you can play. Non-included codecs are available for purchase at the Endless OS Store.

If you dislike managing frequent system updates and new release upgrades, you may have a special liking for Endless OS. As long as you have an Internet connection, the OS periodically checks for updates and automatically downloads and applies them in the background. You get a notification to restart.

Although this desktop design should be an ideal environment for touchscreens, Endless OS does not take to touch very well. This is a major feature weakness if you have a touchscreen laptop or desktop monitor.

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10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more