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Linux 46% Market Share, Windows 43.5% Market Share

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blog.eracc.com: After a study of operating system usage of thousands of people I have discovered that Linux has a 46% market share. Linux now surpasses Windows which is shown to have a 43.5% market share. Overall GNU/Linux distributions have taken the lead from Microsoft based on this study. Honest.

Also: how many linux users are there

Desktop Cost: Linux vs. Windows

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earthweb.com: How much did your computer cost? $500? $1,000? $2,000? How much has it cost you since you bought it? The price of a computer is not a one-time expense — it is rather, an ongoing one. How much you pay for your computer over a year's time, or the entire lifetime of the computer, depends greatly on your choice of operating system.

Windows 7 Vs. Linux: Let's Get Real

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bmighty.com/blog: So, is Windows 7 really a Linux-killer? Does Linux finally have Microsoft on the ropes? Maybe both sides in this "debate" need to step off and get a grip.

Also: A Linux users review on windows 7

Windows 7 Vs. Linux: The Battle For Your Desktop

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informationweek.com: With the release of Windows 7's first public beta, there's a feeling in the air that Microsoft has finally created the Windows they've been promising for a long time. They've got little choice: the public and professional reaction to Vista, and mounting pressure from low-cost Linux on low-cost computing devices, means they've had to act fast.

Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha4 vs. Windows 7 Beta

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blog.ibeentoubuntu: What are you going to use this summer? Ubuntu 9.04 will be released at the end of April and Windows 7 is rumored to be out at the end of July. With the release dates so close together, which would you prefer to run?

Best Netbook OS: XP vs. Windows 7 vs. Ubuntu

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earthweb.com: What’s the best OS for use on the new ultra-portable netbook systems? I used a Samsung NC10 netbook and three operating systems to try to find out the answer.

Is OpenSolaris Ready for Admin Desktops?

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enterprisenetworkingplanet.com: OpenSolaris is essentially GNU-Solaris. When talking about the user experience, one could say that since the GNOME desktop is used, running OpenSolaris is no different from running Linux. For the casual Web, e-mail, and office applications user this may be true. For us network and systems administrators, however, we need to be more careful about jumping ships.

How do you beat free?

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blog.ibeentoubuntu: Linux activists state that the dropping cost of computers will force Microsoft into a corner and it will be unable to compete with low-cost alternatives on either the MS Office or the MS Windows front. Hardware with a Linux distro is often either more expensive or the same price as hardware with MS Windows. Why is that?

The incredible shrinking operating system

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infoworld.com: Windows, Mac OS, and Linux are all getting smaller. What does that mean for you?

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