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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • systemd 233 about to be released, please help testing

    systemd 233 is scheduled to be released next week, and there is only a handful of small issues left. As usual there are tons of improvements and fixes, but the most intrusive one probably is another attempt to move from legacy cgroup v1 to a “hybrid” setup where the new unified (cgroup v2) hierarchy is mounted at /sys/fs/cgroup/unified/ and the legacy one stays at /sys/fs/cgroup/ as usual. This should provide an easier path for software like Docker or LXC to migrate to the unified hiearchy, but even that hybrid mode broke some bits.

  • Keep : A personal shell command keeper

    Introducing a new command line tool which solves the issue of memorizing commands or storing them somewhere which is difficult to find. With the grep and run commands, one can easily find their long forgotten commands and use them them right away.

  • qutebrowser v0.10.0 released

    I'm happy to annouce the release of qutebrowser v0.10.0!

    qutebrowser is a keyboard driven browser with a vim-like, minimalistic interface. It's written using PyQt and cross-platform.

    I haven't announced the v0.9.0 release in this blog (or any patch releases), but for v0.10.0 it definitely makes sense to do so, as it's mostly centered on QtWebEngine!

  • GNOME Pomodoro: A Pomodoro Timer With AppIndicator And GNOME Shell Support

    GNOME Pomodoro is, like the name suggests, a Pomodoro timer for GNOME. The application website mentions that it's currently only for GNOME Shell, however, an AppIndicator is also available.

  • 7 Awesome Open Source Build Automation Tools For Sysadmin/DevOps/Developers

    Build automation is a vital tool for devops, sysadmins, and developers. It is nothing but scripting or automating the process of compiling source code into binary. Sysadmins can use build tools to manage and update config files. Following is a list of awesome open source and popular tools associated with automating build processes on Linux or Unix-like system.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • systemd 233 Is Around The Corner With More Additions, Changes
  • Peek – A Simple Animated Gif Screen Recorder for Linux

    Peek Gif Recorder is the perfect screen capture tool for short and sharp video clips.

    It was designed to use ffmpeg and imagemagick to take screencasts of your desktop and animate them to make them Gifs.

    It’s that nifty tool for those who might want to demo a bug or a brief gameplay session quickly.

  • Git v2.12.0

    The latest feature release Git v2.12.0 is now available at the usual places. It is comprised of 517 non-merge commits since v2.11.0, contributed by 80 people, 24 of which are new faces.

  • Git 2.12 Ships With A Variety Of Changes

    Looking through the release log, Git 2.12 doesn't bring any big breakthrough feature, but has a variety of improvements throughout. Git 2.12 brings updates for its p4 sub-command, finer-grained controls for what transport protocols can be used for clone/fetch/push can now be setup via the configuration file, a variety of updates to other sub-commands, several performance improvements, build updates for Cygwin, and quite a number of fixes too.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Machine Learning Speech Recognition

    Keeping up my yearly blogging cadence, it’s about time I wrote to let people know what I’ve been up to for the last year or so at Mozilla. People keeping up would have heard of the sad news regarding the Connected Devices team here. While I’m sad for my colleagues and quite disappointed in how this transition period has been handled as a whole, thankfully this hasn’t adversely affected the Vaani project. We recently moved to the Emerging Technologies team and have refocused on the technical side of things, a side that I think most would agree is far more interesting, and also far more suited to Mozilla and our core competence.

  • Nuclear is a Multi-Source Desktop Music Player

    If you feel there’s a gap in your life for an Electron-based, cross-platform music player capable of streaming from multiple online sources, I’ve a plug for you.

    Nuclear is a (rather naughty) music streaming app that “pulls in content from free sources all over the internet”. In aim it’s somewhat similar to Tomahawk, but visually owes more to an ultra camp Spotify channeling its inner radioactive diva.

  • Qt 5.9 Alpha Released

    The Qt Company today announced the much-anticipated release of the Qt 5.9 Alpha.

  • Peruse Is a Neat Comic Book Reader for KDE Desktops

    Mcomix is my go-to comic book reader for Ubuntu, but for my KDE desktop I wanted something that feels more at home in the Plasma experience.

    After a bit of digging I came across Peruse.

  • The new Online Accounts & Printer panels (and other related news!)

    Greetings, GNOMErs!

    If you’re watching closely the GNOME Control Center iterations, you probably noticed it already has a bunch of new panels: Keyboard, Mouse & Touchpad, and other panels like Sharing, Privacy and Search that don’t need to be ported.

  • A new journey – GNOME Foundation Executive Director

    For those who haven’t heard, I’ve been appointed as the new Executive Director of the GNOME Foundation, and I started last week on the 15th February.

    It’s been an interesting week so far, mainly meeting lots of people and trying to get up to speed with what looks like an enormous job! However, I’m thoroughly excited by the opportunity and am very grateful for everyone’s warm words of welcome so far.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • 3 mind mapping tools in Fedora

    In a previous Magazine article, we covered tracking your time and tasks. In that article we mentioned some mind mapping tools. Now we’ll cover three mind mapping apps you can use in Fedora. You can use these tools to generate and manipulate maps that show your thoughts. Mind maps can help you to improve your creativity and effectiveness. You can use them for time management, to organize tasks, to overview complex contexts, to sort your ideas, and more.

  • 10 command-line tools for data analysis in Linux

    So you've landed on some data you want to analyze. Where do you begin?

    Many people used to working in a graphical environment might default to using a spreadsheet tool, but there's another way that might prove to be faster and more efficient, with just a little more effort. And you don't need to become an expert in a statistical modeling language or a big data toolset to take advantage of these tools.

    I'm talking about the Linux command line. Just using some tools that you've probably already got installed on your computer, you can learn a lot about a dataset without ever leaving your terminal. Long-time Linux users will of course laugh—they've been using many of these tools for years to parse logs and understand configuration tools. But for the Linux newcomer, the revelation that you've got a whole data analysis toolkit already at your fingertips can be a welcomed surprise.

  • Trojita Is a Super Fast Desktop Email Client for Linux

    If you’re looking for a fast, IMAP compatible email client for Linux, why not try Trojita?

    Trojita aims to fetch and display email as quickly, and as efficiently, as possible. The open-source email app adheres to ‘open standards and modern technologies’, and is built around ‘the vendor-neutrality that IMAP provides’.

  • gparted 0.28.1

    A new version of gparted was released recently and I have updated the Fedora package to the latest version - 0.28.1.

    This version brings a rather exciting (at least, to me) update - ability to copy and resize already open LUKS filesystems.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Tips for tpp and patat

    You might be surprised to learn that there are programs for running presentations in a terminal.

    No, I don't mean opening PowerPoint or Impress slides one after the other, as images in a frame-buffered console. I mean presenting slides coded for the terminal, in a terminal.

  • Introduction to LaTeXila - a multi-language LaTeX editor for Linux

    LaTeXila is a multi-language LaTeX editor for Linux users who prefer the GTK+ looks. The software is simple, easy to use, adequately powerful and customizable, so if you’re interested in LaTeX you should give this tool a try. In the following quick guide, I will showcase how to get started with LaTeXila and what its main features are. But first...

  • Nautilus 3.24 to Bring Desktop Support for Wayland Sessions, Easy Root Browsing

    The GNOME 3.24 desktop environment is coming in only one month from today, on March 22, and it will bring with it a lot of new features for many of its core components and applications, including the Nautilus (Files) file manager.

    GNOME developer Carlos Soriano is sharing with us today the upcoming features of Nautilus 3.24, as well all the improvements and bug fixes that landed so far, and what didn't make it in the release, which will be available for all users as part of the GNOME 3.24 Stack.

Wine Staging Release 2.2

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Software
  • [Wine Staging] Release 2.2

    Since the last release, we tested various games with the CSMT (command stream multithreading) feature enabled to identify remaining bugs and possible ways to improve performance. As a result, this release includes various speed optimizations, especially for DX10/11 games. Some functions, for example updating subresources, which previously required synchronization with the command stream thread, can now be done asynchronously. There might still be differences compared to Wine Staging 2.0, since some of the speed improvements from the original CSMT patchset contained bugs and have not been fixed / added back yet.

  • Wine-Staging 2.2 released with CSMT speed optimizations

    The Wine team has put out another Wine-Staging release based on Wine 2.2, this new development release has some CSMT speed optimizations.

    For those that don't know what CSMT is, it stands for "Commandstream multithreading" which should give you better performance in Wine.

  • Wine-Staging 2.2 Offers CSMT Speed Optimizations

    Wine-Staging 2.2 is now available as the latest version of Wine that carries various testing/experimental patches re-based atop the latest Wine bi-weekly development snapshot.

Digital audio and video editing in GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software
Movies
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstation Roundup

    In the world of home studio recording, the digital audio workstation is one of the most important tools of the trade. Digital audio workstations are used to record audio and MIDI data into patterns or tracks. This information is then typically mixed down into songs or albums. In the Linux ecosystem, there is no shortage of Digital audio workstations to chose from. Whether you wish to create minimalist techno or full orchestral pieces, chances are there is an application that has you covered.

    In this article, we will take a brief look into several of these applications and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. I will try to provide a fair evaluation of the DAWs presented here but at the end of the day, I urge you to try a few of these applications and to form an opinion of your own.

  • Shotcut Video Editor Available As A Snap Package [Quick Update]

    Shotcut is a free, open source Qt5 video editor developed on the MLT Multimedia Framework (it's developed by the same author as MLT), available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Under the hood, Shotcut uses FFmpeg, so it supports many audio, video and image formats, along with screen, webcam and audio capture.

    The application doesn't require importing files, thanks to its native timeline editing. Other features worth mentioning are multitrack timeline with thumbnails and waveforms, 4k resolution support, video effects, as well as a flexible UI with dockable panels.

  • Simple Screen Recorder Is Now Available as a Snap App

    Simple Screen Recorder, a popular screen recording app for Linux desktops, is now available to install as a Snap app from the Ubuntu Store.

GNOME and Other Software

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Software
GNOME
  • Nautilus 3.24 – The changes

    Since Nautilus was created, if a user wanted to open a folder where the user didn’t have permissions, for example a system folder where only root has access, it was required to start Nautilus with sudo.

    However running UI apps under root is strongly discouraged, and to be honest, quite inconvenient. Running any UI app with sudo is actually not even supported in Wayland by design due to the security issues that that conveys.

  • GNOME hackaton in Brno

    Last week, we had a presentation on Google Summer of Code and Outreachy at Brno University of Technology. Around 80 students attended which was a pretty good success considering it was not part of any course. It was a surprise for the uni people as well because the room they booked was only for 60 ppl.

  • Peek Gif Recorder Gets Updated, Now Available from a PPA

    Peek, the nifty animated gif screen capture app for Linux desktops, has been updated.

    Peek 0.9 reduces the size of temporary files, adds a resolution downsampling option (to help the app use fewer resources when rendering your gif), and introduces fallback support for avconf should ffmpeg be unavailable.

  • Cerebro is an Open Source OS X Spotlight Equivalent for Linux

    Billed as an ‘open-source productivity booster with a brain’, Cerebro is an Electron app able to run across multiple platforms. It’s an extendable, open-source alternative to Spotlight and Alfred on macOS, and Synapse, Kupfer, Ulauncher, GNOME Do, and others on Linux.

  • JBoss Fuse 6.3 integration services for Red Hat OpenShift released

    Red Hat announced the latest update to the Red Hat JBoss Fuse-based integration service on Red Hat OpenShift. With the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud-based SaaS systems, and new data streams, organizations can face increasing pressure to more quickly deliver innovative new services. Traditional centralized, monolithic ESB-style integration approaches are often ill-suited to support the business in responding to this pressure.

  • Fedora 25: The perf linux tool.
  • Meet the chap open-sourcing US govt code – Paul, an ex-Microsoft anti-piracy engineer [Ed: Used to work for Microsoft and now spreads the GPL ("cancer" according to Microsoft) in the US government]

    The manager of the project, Berg said, really wanted to release MOOSE as open source, but didn't know how to do so. As a result it took 18 months to traverse government bureaucracy and to obtain the necessary permissions. It's now available under the GPL 2.1 license.

Security Leftovers

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Software
  • Atom Installer

    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage.

    In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.

  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More

    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More

    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution.

    Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.9.13

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.13 kernel. All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.4.52 Linux 4.10.1

OSS Leftovers

  • What motivates the open-source community?
    Many of us will have been involved in a free-software community that ran out of steam, and either ended up moribund or just plain died. Some of us will have gone through such cycles more than once; it's never nice to watch something that used to be a vibrant community in its death throes. Knowing what motivates the sort of people who get heavily involved in free software projects is really useful when trying to keep them motivated, and a systematic approach to understanding this is what Rina Jensen, Strategist at Mozilla, talked about at FOSDEM 2017. Mozilla talks a lot about promoting innovation and opportunity on the web, and the organization does care a lot about those objectives, but the realities of day-to-day life can interfere and make working toward them tedious. The thinking was that if Mozilla could help make the experience for contributors better, then the contributors could make Mozilla better — but doing that required understanding how things could be better for contributors.
  • Shuttle Music Player is now Open Source
    Music is a major part of everyone’s life, and our smartphones allow us to truly enjoy our music anywhere. Over the years, Android has received a fair share of excellent music player apps, and Shuttle Music Player has managed to stand out. Shuttle is a music player following Google’s Material Design guidelines, and its listing is nearing 4 Million downloads. Currently, the app offers two versions: free and paid. The paid version is priced at $0.99 and has received over 50 thousand downloads on the Play Store already.
  • OpenStack isn’t dead. It’s boring. That’s a good thing.
    The first OpenStack Project Teams Gathering (PTG) event was held this week in Atlanta. The week was broken into two parts: cross-project work on Monday and Tuesday, and individual projects Wednesday through Friday. I was there for the first two days and heard a few discussions that started the same way.
  • NetBSD 7.1_RC2 available
  • NetBSD 7.1 RC2 Released
    The second release candidate to the upcoming NetBSD 7.1 is now available for testing. NetBSD 7.1 RC2 is primarily comprised of fixes since 7.1 RC1, and in particular, security fixes. The raw list of NetBSD 7.1 changes can be found here.
  • Pentagon Launches Open-Source Experiment
    With a new website showcasing federal software code, the Pentagon is the latest government entity to join the open-source movement. The Defense Department this week launched Code.mil, a public site that will eventually showcase unclassified code written by federal employees. Citizens will be able to use that code for personal and public projects. Code written by government employees can be shared with the public because that material usually isn't covered by copyright protections in the U.S., according to the Pentagon.
  • Coder Dojo: Kids Teaching Themselves Programming
    Despite not much advertising, word has gotten around and we typically have 5-7 kids on Dojo nights, enough that all the makerspace's Raspberry Pi workstations are filled and we sometimes have to scrounge for more machines for the kids who don't bring their own laptops. A fun moment early on came when we had a mentor meeting, and Neil, our head organizer (who deserves most of the credit for making this program work so well), looked around and said "One thing that might be good at some point is to get more men involved." Sure enough -- he was the only man in the room! For whatever reason, most of the programmers who have gotten involved have been women. A refreshing change from the usual programming group. (Come to think of it, the PEEC web development team is three women. A girl could get a skewed idea of gender demographics, living here.) The kids who come to program are about 40% girls.
  • Microsoft hasn't turned a phone into a PC just yet [Ed: copying GNU/Linux again]
    Using the Lapdock wired to the X3 charges the phone and provides the most reliable connection for Continuum. I found the wireless connection made things a little unreliable and choppy on some more graphically intense things like full-screen video playback. Connecting the phone is as simple as just plugging it in and watching a Windows 10 desktop burst to life on the Lapdock. While the Windows 10 desktop looks familiar, this is exactly when I realized just how limited Continuum really is. There’s a Start Menu that’s basically the home screen of a Windows phone, and access to Cortana, but there’s a lot missing. Things like putting apps side by side simply don’t exist in this Continuum world, nor do a lot of the typical places you’d right-click on apps or use keyboard shortcuts to get to the desktop. If you’re a Windows power user like me, or even if you’re just used to a standard window management system, it’s immediately frustrating.

today's howtos

UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel

Several years back we wrote about Ultra Kernel Samepage Merging (UKSM) for data de-duplication within the Linux kernel for transparently scanning all application memory and de-duping it where possible. While the original developer is no longer active, a new developer has been maintaining the work and continues to support it on the latest Linux kernel releases. Read more