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Software

GNOME and Other Software

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Software
GNOME
  • Dash to Panel – A Cool Icon Taskbar for the GNOME Shell

    Dash to Panel is a customizable open source extension for the GNOME Shell that moves the dash into GNOME’s main panel; combining app launchers and the system tray into one panel like that of KDE Plasma and Windows 7+.

  • GNOME's Mutter Window Manager Now Supports Tablet Wheel Events on Wayland

    The Mutter composite and window manager of the widely-used GNOME desktop environment was updated recently both on the stable and devel channels with a bunch of new features and improvements.

    Mutter 3.24.4 is now the latest stable build of the application, and it's here to add a few important changes for tablets, including improved stability of tablet plugs and unplugs, working window moving and resizing via tablet tools, as well as the implementation of tablet rings/strips configuration.

    In addition, Mutter now no longer throttles motion events on tablet tools, it's capable of handling the left-handed mode on pen/eraser devices, and adds support for tablet wheel events when running under the Wayland display server. Talking about Wayland, the Wacom cursor offset should now work as expected in Mutter 3.24.4.

  • Terminus: A Great Modern And Highly Cutomizable Terminal For Linux

    Are you tired of your default terminal or looking for an alternative which can look cool as well as perform operation in your system? If yes, Terminus is for you which is modern terminal designed to be highly customizable, it will let you enjoy CLI. If you are using Linux since there were CRT monitors with Linux then check out Cool-Retro-Term, which is another great looking terminal application.
    Terminus is built using web technologies based on Electron, it is cross-platform modern age terminal available for (Linux, Windows and Mac), on Linux it is a full terminal which can spawn with a global hotkey, tabs persist after restart, Auto-dock to anyside of any screen, full Unicode and double-width character support. On Windows it supports Classic CMD, PowerShell and Bash on Windows. On Mac it just works.
    Multiple app themes and a myriad of community color schemes for the terminal. Color scheme editor included. Install plugins from the NPM repository, or create your own with Typescript and Angular framework.

  • Some Useful Indicators: Ayatana, Clipboard-Autoedit, Diskstat, Files, Bulletin and Udisks

    Panel Indicators always comes in handy when you have to do some productive work on your desktop computer, to access quick functions of different applications these indicators saves you a lot of time, some indicator give you information you want to receive, it all depends on your needs. Today presenting you some useful indicators which may help you and makes your desktop experience much better. Following all the indicators are developed by just one guy and available through his PPA.

Software and howtos

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Software
HowTos

Wine 2.13

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 2.13 is now available.

  • Wine 2.13 Released: Unicode 10.0, Better Mouse Cursors

    If Wine 2.0.2 with 60+ bug fixes doesn't interest you, perhaps the Wine 2.13 development update will get you more excited.

    Wine 2.13 is now available as the latest bi-weekly development release leading up to the eventual release of Wine 3.0 around year's end. Changes with Wine 2.13 include updating Unicode data to Unicode 10.0, nicer looking default mouse cursors are now used, support for persistent connections in WinHTTP, WebServices message framing protocol support, improved metafile support in GDI Plus, debug register support in x86-64 exception handling, and DirectWrite anti-aliasing improvements.

  • Wine 2.13 has been released with a few noteworthy changes, including fixes for The Witcher 3

    Another Wine development release is now available! Just today Wine 2.13 has released and features a few noteworthy changes.

Software: Emacs and Magit, KeePassXC, Weblate, Cockpit, Kate, AtCore, GNOME Builder, Undo, and WPS Office

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Software
  • Emacs and Magit

    The Git source-code management system is widely known for its flexibility and for the distributed development model that it supports. Its reputation for ease of use is ... less well established. There should, thus, be an opening for front-end systems that can make Git easier to use. One of the most comprehensive Git front ends, Magit, works within the Emacs editor and has a wide following. But Magit has run into some turbulence within the Emacs development community that is blocking its wider distribution.

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  • KeePassXC: A Great Way to Manage Passwords In Linux

    Do you always forget your password or want to have strongest password which can be hard to remember? If yes, then here is an application for you which will keep your passwords safe, strongest and encrypted. KeePassXC is an open-source forked from KeePassX by community released under GNU GPL license, it is cross-platform and all features works perfectly on every platform (Linux, Mac and Windows), as it is mentioned on KeePassXC website they have thoroughly tested features on multiple systems to provide user with the same look and feel on every supported operating system. This includes the beloved Auto-Type feature. KeePassXC, on the other hand, is developed in C++ and runs natively on all platforms giving you the best-possible platform integration.

  • Making Weblate more secure and robust

    Having publicly running web application always brings challenges in terms of security and in generally in handling untrusted data. Security wise Weblate has been always quite good (mostly thanks to using Django which comes with built in protection against many vulnerabilities), but there were always things to improve in input validation or possible information leaks.

  • Cockpit 146

    The Available Updates and Restart recommended pages now show the packages from the previous update run. This makes it easier to see which services to check or to decide whether a restart is really necessary...

  • Kate is now translated also on Windows!
  • AtCore officially moved to KDE Extragear

    It’s with all the joy in my heart that I share with you this amazing notice: AtCore was officially moved today to KDE Extragear by my favorite sysadmin Ben Cooksley after more than a month on KDE Review.

    This is the first huge milestone that we achieve on this 11 months of team work made by me, Patrick, Chris and sometimes Tomaz.

    Particularly I thanks, Luigui Toscano and Albert Cid for all the attention and review on AtCore code, that allowed us to make this move to Extragear. =D

  • Builder 3.25.5

    Like every year, GUADEC has snuck up on me. I’ll be heading out to Manchester in a handful of days which means things are going to get hectic any moment now.

    We just reached another milestone in our development phase towards 3.26. I’ve landed two important components which will have important roles in Builder’s future. The new visual layout, and the new shortcut engine. Neither are complete yet, but they are good enough to land on master and allow us to iterate without giant branches.

  • What I do at Undo

    In October, I started working for Undo and, now that I understand our technology better, it’s time to explain what I do.

    Undo produces a (closed source) technology which allows to record, rewind and replay Linux programs (on x86 and ARM).
    One of our products using this technology is UndoDB, a debugger built on top of gdb which allows you to do everything you do with gdb, but also to go back in time.

  • WPS Office Is An Alternative To Microsoft Office for Linux

    WPS Office is a slang for Writer, Presentation ad Spreadsheets, formerly known as Kingsoft Office. It is free (basic version) Office suite available for all platforms Linux, Windows, Mac, Android and iOS. A fully featured professional-grade version is also available for a subscription fee.

Wine 2.0.2

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Software
  • Wine 2.0.2 Released With 62 Bug Fixes

    The Wine project has today announced Wine 2.0.2 as the newest stable update for running Windows programs on Linux, macOS, and other operating systems.

    If you aren't using the Wine 2.x bi-weekly development releases for the bleeding-edge experience to culminate with the stable Wine 3.0 release in a few months, Wine 2.0.2 is the newest and best for the time being.

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine maintenance release 2.0.2 is now available.

Software: VirtualBox 5.1.24, Wireshark, Code::Blocks, Minuet, MPV, Cronopete, Darkstat, Krita 3.2, QdirStat

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Software
  • VirtualBox 5.1.24 Adds Initial Support for Linux 4.13, Improves Fedora Support

    Oracle announced the release and immediate availability of VirtualBox 5.1.24 as the latest and most advanced version of the open-source and cross-platform virtualization software.

    Nearly three months in development, VirtualBox 5.1.24 comes with a lot of improvements and bug fixes, in particular for users of GNU/Linux distributions. First off, it introduces initial support for the upcoming Linux 4.13 kernel series, whose development was kicked off last Saturday by Linus Torvalds.

  • Wireshark, World’s Most Popular Network Protocol Analyzer, Gets New Release

    Wireshark, the world’s most popular network protocol analyzer, an open-source and cross-platform network tool used for troubleshooting, development, analysis, and education purposes, has been updated today to version 2.2.8.

  • Code::Blocks IDE Review

    ​Codeblocks is an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for programmers and developers. It comes with predefined tools to develop Qt applications, plugins, console applications, etc. considering one has installed the required tools independently (eg- Qt development tools). Most IDEs come with “project” feature and that’s the turning point because some of them requires user to create one before proceeding any further, where in some cases programming (in schools and colleges) exercise don’t really need tedious task of creating and setting up “projects” (More to this later).

  • Minuet – plugin architecture

    As the title of this blog post suggests, the first evaluation has been successfully passed, the project accomplishing all the proposed goals. Thus, let me present you the progress I’ve done for the first evaluation.

  • Terminal and shell performance

     

    Most terminals have enough latency that the user experience could be improved if the terminals concentrated more on latency and less on other features or other aspects of performance. However, when I search for terminal benchmarks, I find that terminal authors, if they benchmark anything, benchmark the speed of sinking stdout or memory usage at startup.

  • MPV 0.26 0 Open-Source MPlayer-Based Video Player Released with New Features

    MPV developer Martin Herkt released a new stable update of the MPV open-source and cross-platform video player software based on the MPlayer project, version 0.26.0.

    Coming approximately three months after the 0.25.0 update, the MPV 0.26.0 release is here to upgrade the VA-API/VDPAU hardware decoding code, which now requires the FFmpeg 3.2 multimedia framework or a higher version, as well as to enable support for C plugins by default.

  • Cronopete – An Apple’s Time Machine Clone For Linux

    If you use Mac OS, you certainly have known about or used Time machine. It is a backup software application distributed with the Apple’s Mac OS X. It is used to backup your data to an external drive, so that you can restore them later from the backup. If you are a fan boy/girl of Time Machine, you need to check out “Cronopete”. It is the clone of Time Machine for Linux operating systems. Using Cronopete, we can easily create periodic backups of a Linux system. It supports popular Linux distributions, including Arch Linux, Debian, Fedora, and Ubuntu.

  • Darkstat – A Web Based Linux Network Traffic Analyzer

    Darkstat is a cross-platform, lightweight, simple, real-time network statistics tool that captures network traffic, computes statistics concerning usage, and serves the reports over HTTP.

  • Krita 3.2 Open-Source Digital Painting App Promises Some Very Cool New Features

    Development of the major Krita 3.2 open-source and cross-platform digital painting software kicked off yesterday with the release of the first Beta milestone, giving the community a first glimpse of the new features and improvements.

    Compared to Krita 3.1.4, which appears to be the last point release in the current stable Krita 3.1 series of the application, Krita 3.2 promises some very cool new features, such as the use the gmic-qt plugin, which completely replaces the older G'MIC plugin, and the addition of Radian’s brush set to create a strong, painterly look.

  • QdirStat Linux Disk Management

    QDirStat is an open source utility Linux disk management utility with GUI. Tree-map displays directories and files in rectangular areas. The larger a file the larger is the rectangle which represents it. All files in one directory are painted within the rectangle of that directory. It offers a great visual way of managing network and local file space.

  • Handy Backup – The Linux Compatible Software Solution

Software: Netutils, Heimdall, Nageru, stress-ng, casync, MPV

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Software

Software: clspv, Pale Moon, LibreOffice

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Software
  • Codeplay Release “clspv”, an OpenCL Tool for Vulkan Enabled Devices

    In collaboration with Google, Codeplay is proud to announce the release of a new open-source tool allowing the compilation of OpenCL C language kernels to run on the Vulkan API.

  • Pale Moon browser new release, better media support

    I have updated my palemoon.SlackBuild and have uploaded fresh Slackware packages for this new Pale Moon 27.4.0. As previously shared with you, I diverge from the official developers’ recommendations about how to compile this browser on Linux. For instance the gcc compiler I used on Slackware 14.2 is gcc-5.3.0 (which is part of this distro release). On -current I failed compiling with the gcc-7.1.0 compiler which is the default there and I had to create a “gcc5” package for gcc-5.4.0 (which was an earlier gcc version in slackware-current). I wrote an article on this very blog about that gcc5 package if you are interested, it can be installed in parallel with Slackware’s own gcc-7. There are some other differences, mainly in the way I optimize my build.

  • LibreOffice 5.3.4 Released and Available via PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    LibreOffice is the power-packed free, libre and open source personal productivity suite for Windows, Macintosh and GNU/Linux, that gives you six feature-rich applications for all your document production and data processing needs: Writer, the word processor, Calc, the spreadsheet application, Impress, the presentation engine, Draw, our drawing and flowcharting application, Base, our database and database frontend, and Math for editing mathematics. Its clean interface and powerful tools let you unleash your creativity and grow your productivity. Support and documentation is free from our large, dedicated community of users, contributors and developers.

Software and Games: Calibre, Tooth And Tail, KDE Components Not Yet Ported to KF5, and TeX Live

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Software
Gaming
  • Calibre 3.4 Open-Source eBook Manager Makes Exporting of Books a Lot Easier

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal released today a new stable version of his popular, open-source and cross-platform Calibre ebook library management software, Calibre 3.4.

    Calibre 3.4 is here only one week after the release of the 3.3 update, which means that it's not a major version and it only adds a few user interface improvements, along with the usual bug fixes. The most important thing introduced in Calibre 3.4 is the a new method of exporting books to your computer.

  • Tooth And Tail, a new RTS game from Pocketwatch Games looks awesome, confirmed for Linux

    Pocketwatch Games (Monaco: What's Yours Is Mine) have announced their new strategy game Tooth and Tail [Steam, GOG, Official Site]. Not only does it look awesome and unique, but I've also got confirmation that it will be on Linux.

  • The KDE Components Not Yet Ported To KDE Frameworks 5

    With the beta of KDE Applications 17.08 due next week, which is the last cycle where Qt4/kdelibs4-dependent components are still permitted, KDE developer Christoph Feck has generated a list of KDE software not yet ported over to Qt5/KF5.

    It's with KDE Applications 17.12 where only Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 applications will be bundled with finally closing the door to Qt4/KDE4 programs that have yet to be ported.

  • TeX Live contrib repository (re)new(ed)

    It is my pleasure to announce the renewal/rework/restart of the TeX Live contrib repository service. The repository is collecting packages that cannot enter TeX Live directly (mostly due to license reasons), but are free to distribute. The basic idea is to provide a repository mimicking Debian’s nonfree branch.

Software: BleachBit, IBus-UniEmoji, systemd

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Software
  • BleachBit – A Quick And Best Way to Clean Up Your Linux System (Best CCleaner Alternative)

    When you are running out of disk space on system, instantly you might use DU (Disk Usage) command to check the system disk usage but it wont give you about cached data, internet history, and junk files usage.

    To accomplish this, i would advise you to install BleachBit System cleaner utility. Its best CCleaner Alternatives for Linux and clean everything in your system in depth way.

  • IBus-UniEmoji – Type Emoji Directly into Your Linux Desktop

    I don’t know how often you type Emoji using your Linux desktop but none of the Ubuntu distros ships with that feature. The normal way to go about entering Emoji is to copy it and paste it into your desired location. It is thanks to IBUs-UniEmoji that you no longer need to do that.

  • systemd 234 Released with Support for the Meson Build System, Some Improvements

    systemd developer Lennart Poettering announced the release and immediate availability for download of a new update to the widely-used init system for Linux-based operating systems, versioned 234.

    systemd 234 has been in development for the past four and a half months, which is a lot of time, but it doesn't look it's a major release or anything, bringing only a few new features and several under-the-hood improvements, along with a bunch of bug fixes and security enhancements.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE's Plasma 5.10.4 in Chakra GNU/Linux

15 ways to empower students with open source tools

Recently I read the fascinating book Empower: What Happens When Students Own Their Own Learning, by John Spencer and A.J. Juliani. The book led me to think more deeply about my teaching methods and how I like to learn. I think learning should be exciting, and I'm happiest when I'm actively engaged in what I'm doing. Why wouldn't students in our schools want anything different than that? And why aren't we doing more to give that experience to them? While many schools today have a 1:1 ratio of computers/tablets to students, most of them use platforms and software that allow little (if any) modification. Students can't tinker with the software or hardware. Yet tinkering and experimenting are at the heart of learning. The authors of Empower say that students in environments that foster "making" take ownership of their learning more readily and tend to be deeper thinkers who are more at home with frustration. Ultimately, they wrote, "makers are better equipped for life." Read more

Red Hat Upgrade and Insider Selling

OSS: Yandex, The Open Source Way, Machine Learning, and BSD

  • In Other API Economy News: Yandex Open Source Machine Learning Library and More
    We start your weekend off with a review of the stories we couldn’t cover with a look at what what going on in the world of APIs. We start off with news that Yandex, the Russian search engine company, has announced that they are open-sourcing CatBoost, a machine learning library. The library is based on gradient boosting, a machine learning technique described by TechCrunch as being “designed to help “teach” systems when you have a very sparse amount of data, and especially when the data may not all be sensorial (such as audio, text or imagery), but includes transactional or historical data, too.” Yandex is freely releasing CatBoost for anyone to use under an Apache License. This move is similar to what we saw from Google when they open sourced TensorFlow in late 2015. As the demand for artificial intelligence solutions backed by machine learning platforms continues to grow, moves like this serve to help a wide range of developers take advantage of the technology.
  • CatBoost: Yandex's machine learning algorithm is available free of charge
  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community. Additionally, as organizations, especially government, continue to emerge from the technology funding embargo of the Great (2008) Recession - an economic force that froze IT purchases and programs and forced many into strict “keep the lights on” operational mode, IT managers and CIO’s are carefully expending their still relatively measly budgets. [...] For IT organizations, especially government, with limited budgets and long procurement processes, time and increased experience with open source products will lead to a growing understanding and acceptance. And as this understanding progresses and becomes more accepted, open source will become a “go to” option to keep up with the fast moving technical environment, and perhaps eventually, as a standard first option, realizing the broader set of open source values by relying on the collective work and minds of a virtual community of IT “hackers”, “geeks” and “nerds”, working globally, 24x7/365 to explore, develop and showcase whatever tech that sparks their individual interest.
  • Top 5 open-source tools for machine learning

    Given the paradigmatic shifts that a true revolution in machine learning could bring, it’s important to maintain tech’s devotion to open-source. These kinds of scientific advancement don’t belong to any one company or corporation, but to the whole world. Making ML open and evenly distributed means everyone can join in this revolution.

  • Release of TinySegmenter 0.3
    Today I released version 0.3 of TinySegmenter, a Japanese Tokenizer in pure Python (released in New BSD license), with a single minor fix for proper install on systems not-using UTF-8 (apparently that still exists! :P). Thanks to Mišo Belica for the patch. Apparently some of his Japanese users are using it for Sumy, his software to extract summary from texts.
  • BSDTW 2017 CFP
     

    BSDTW 2017 will be held on the 11th and 12th of November 2017 (Sat/Sun), in Taipei. We are now requesting proposals for talks. We do not require academic or formal papers. If you wish to submit a formal paper, you are welcome to, but it is not required.

    The talks should be written with strong technical content. Presentations on the use of BSD in products and companies are strongly encouraged but marketing proposals are not appropriate for this venue.