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digiKam 6.1.0 is released

Filed under
KDE
Software

Dear digiKam fans and users, after the first digiKam 6 release published in February 2019, we received lots of user feedback to consolidate this important stage of this project started 2 years ago. We are proud to quickly announce the new digiKam 6.1.0, with plenty of new features and fixes.

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4 of the Best Screen Recorders for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

There are plenty of reasons you might need to record your screen. Maybe you’re a developer looking to demonstrate an app you built. Perhaps you’re looking to do an instructional screencast. You might just want to show a family member how to do something.

You have plenty of choices when it comes to which screen recorder to use on Ubuntu. Some are simple to use, while others are more complicated but have additional features. It also depends on whether you prefer a GUI or the command line.

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Also: qt-fsarchiver

Best Free Clocks for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Digital clocks are an important utility to have because, without them, we wouldn’t be able to keep track of time without looking at our watch or analog clocks. And while we have covered several timer apps with the likes of Stretchly, Thomas, and Chronobreak, we haven’t reviewed any clock apps.

Today, I’ve decided to make up for that by bringing you a list of the best clock applications for Linux. They are listed in alphabetic order.

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7 Essential Linux Apps for Guitarists

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Software

If you have a digital audio device that can connect your guitar to your Linux computer, there’s a library of open-source software you can access for recording, editing, and processing the signal. These apps are especially well-suited to guitarists but can be useful for any musician.

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10 Best Linux Flashcard Software

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Software

A flashcard stores information on a set of cards, with the information being typically portrayed as words and numbers. The purpose of flashcards is to enable individuals to store verbal and visual information, often as a learning drill by way of spaced repetition. The Leitner system is a popular method of studying with flashcards using spaced repetition.

When you learn flashcards of new words each day for a number of days, this information is stored in your short-term memory. Flashcards also exercise the mental process of active recall. This is an efficient learning principle where an individual’s memory is stimulated during the learning process. Unlike a passive review (e.g. reading a book), active recall is designed to consolidate long-lasting memory of information. Transferring information from short-term to long-term memory is essential in studying for an examination.

Flashcards are one of the best tools for memorizing information. This is partly because of their versatility. They can help teach multiplication skills, learn a foreign language, recall facts, historical dates, in fact anything that can be learned in an intuitive way.

To provide an insight into the quality of software available, we have compiled a list of 10 excellent flashcard applications. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone who wants to memorize information. Here’s our verdict on each of the open source applications.

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QMPlay2 – Qt based video and audio player

Filed under
Software
Movies

I’ve been devoting the last year writing about a wide range of open source music players. Most of them I’ve been able to recommend, although I’ve encountered a few turkeys along the way. There’s a few readers who’ve suggested I branch out and review open source software that offers both video and audio playing capabilities.

QMPlay2 is one such player. It can play most video formats and audio formats. It plays all codecs supported by FFmpeg, and supports YouTube videos too. With internet radio, Audio CD, and a lot more besides, there’s lots of functionality on offer.

The software is written in the C++ programming language with the Qt 5 framework and uses FFmpeg.

Here’s my take on QMPlay2. I’ll look at the software’s widgets in some detail, and compare its memory usage with other video players. Your feedback is very important, so feel free to add your comments below.

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5 Command Line Tools to Break Your Dependence on the GUI

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Software

If you are a Linux sysadmin, you tend to spend a lot of time on the command line. Over the years I have learned to do much of my work without ever touching the mouse. Also, if I open a browser it is just too easy to be distracted. Social media, news articles, and funny cat videos all are designed to suck you in, and it works. In this countdown we will explore 5 things you can do from the command line to keep you productive and break your dependence on the GUI.

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9 Best Free Linux HDR Imaging Software

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Software

High dynamic range imaging (HDR) is an important technology for photographers. It is a collection of techniques that allow a wider dynamic range of luminances between the lightest and darkest areas of an image.

The human eye can adapt to luminances from 0.000,000,1 cd/m² up to 1,000,000 cd/m², and can cope with a luminance range of 1:1000. However, computer displays only offer a contrast of approximately 300:1. This means that the luminance offered by a computer monitor falls significantly short to what the human eye can actually process.

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Proprietary: AutoCAD and Expandrive on GNU/Linux

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Software
  • AutoCAD for Linux & Ubuntu – How to Install It

    Linux is a household name when it comes to the alluring world of open-source software. It offers a great deal of freedom for running software outside the Windows and Mac world. Under Linux, there are many different varieties, such as openSuse, Fedora, and the ever-popular Ubuntu. In this article, we will demonstrate how to install AutoCAD on an Ubuntu platform specifically, but the same steps can be followed for any other version of Linux.

    Running an open-source operating system (OS) has loads of benefits. Rather than being stuck to the platform specifications, you’re free to customize it exactly as you’d like. However, sometimes this can create a problem when you want to run software that isn’t available for your OS. When in comes to 3D modeling, this is specifically a concern for Autodesk’s AutoCAD, which is only available for Windows and Mac PCs.

    While there are plenty of other CAD alternatives, sometimes there’s no avoiding AutoCAD. Or sometimes you simply want the best. Either way, we’re here to walk you through a couple of options on how to get the best of both worlds: AutoCAD on your Linux.

  • How to install ExpanDrive for Ubuntu, Mint, Debian, CentOS, RHEL Linux

    Expandrive is an application that allows users to mount the cloud storage drives directly on the Windows, MacOS and Linux just like the local drives under the Expandrive app. It helps to make us hassle free of opening browser and log in to cloud storage for downloading or uploading some file.

    The cloud providers it supports are Dropbox, Google Drive, Google Team Drives, Amazon Drive, Box, OneDrive, OneDrive for Business, Sharepoint, OOpenStackSwift, BackBlaze B2, Amazon S3 or your own SFTP, FTP or WebDAV server and SMB/Windows File Sharing.

    Installation of ExpanDrive is pretty easy on Windows and MacOS, however, for Ubuntu and RedHat, the company has recently publicized the Linux version of the same software. Here we are showing the installation on Ubuntu and Redhat which will the same for other Linux OS such as Linux Mint, Debian, Elementary OS, Centos, Fedora including older versions of Ubuntu such as 18.04, 17.04, 16.04, 15.04…

Ducktype 1.0

Filed under
Development
Software

Earlier this week, I released the final specification for Ducktype 1.0. If you’d like a quick primer on what Ducktype looks like, check out our Learn Ducktype tutorial.

Ducktype is a lightweight syntax designed to be able to do everything Mallard can do. It doesn’t sacrifice semantics. It doesn’t sacrifice metadata. It doesn’t sacrifice nesting and content model.

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More in Tux Machines

Nebra Anybeam turns your Raspberry Pi into a pocket home cinema projector

TVs are available to buy in truly huge sizes these days, and with 4K (and upwards) resolution, movies and TV shows really come to life. But there’s something even more magical about watching a film projected onto a screen or a wall. With the right setup, it can be like having a cinema in your home. You don’t necessarily need to spend a fortune on a projector though. Nebra Anybeam can turn your Raspberry Pi into a cinema projector that you can slip into your pocket and take anywhere. Read more Also: Nebra AnyBeam - world's smallest pocket cinema projectors

Back in the Day: UNIX, Minix and Linux

I don't remember my UCSD email address, but some years later, I was part of the admin team on the major UUCP hub hplabs, and my email address was simply hplabs!taylor. Somewhere along the way, networking leaped forward with TCP/IP (we had TCP/IP "Bake Offs" to test interoperability). Once we had many-to-many connectivity, it was clear that the "bang" notation was unusable and unnecessarily complicated. We didn't want to worry about routing, just destination. Enter the "@" sign. I became taylor@hplabs.com. Meanwhile, UNIX kept growing, and the X Window System from MIT gained popularity as a UI layer atop the UNIX command line. In fact, X is a public domain implementation of the windowing system my colleagues and I first saw at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. PARC had computers where multiple programs were on the screen simultaneously in "windows", and there was a pointer device used to control them—so cool. Doug Englebart was inspired too; he went back to Stanford Research Institute and invented the mouse to make control of those windows easier. At Apple, they also saw what was being created at PARC and were inspired to create the Macintosh with all its windowing goodness. Still, who doesn't love the command line, as Ritchie and Kernighan had originally designed it in the early days of UNIX? (UNIX, by the way, is a wordplay on a prior multiuser operating system called Multics, but that's another story.) Read more

Python Programming Leftovers

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • USB Support In Chrome OS 75 Will Make Linux Incredibly Versatile
    Chrome OS Linux instances are on the cusp of becoming immensely more useful and versatile based on a recent change spotted by Keith I Myers in the beta-specific Developer Channel following an update to version 75.0.3759.4. That's because while the update inevitably introduced some new bugs that will need to be squashed before a final release, it also included full support for USB devices on the Crostini side of the equation.
  • Old computer? Linux can give it a new lease on life
    The operating system is called Linux and was created in 1991 by Finnish student Linus Torvalds. He released Linux as open source which meant that any good programmer could tinker with it and improve upon the original. Today Linux is a popular free alternative for Windows and Mac computers and used by millions of people. The beauty is that Linux requires much less processing power and memory than Windows and is perfect for older computers.
  • At Least 27% Of Gentoo's Portage Can Be Easily LTO Optimized For Better Performance
    entooLTO is a configuration overlay for Gentoo's overlay to make it easy to enable Link Time Optimizations (LTO) and other compiler optimizations for enabling better performance out of the Gentoo packages. GentooLTO appears to be inspired in part by the likes of Clear Linux who employ LTO and other compiler optimization techniques like AutoFDO for yielding better performance than what is conventionally shipped by Linux distributions. The GentooLTO developers and users have wrapped up their survey looking at how practical this overlay configuration is on the massive Portage collection.  The initial GentooLTO survey has been going on since last October and they have collected data from more than 30 users. The survey found that of the Gentoo Portage 18,765 packages as of writing, at least 5,146 of them are working with the GentooLTO configuration.