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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client

    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja

  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24

    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems.

    According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700.

    Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.

  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands

    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release.

    MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio.

    Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.

  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux

    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components.

    FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.

  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released

    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C.

    This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods.

    The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

Cost Effective Linux Server Software for Enterprises

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Server
Software

The advantages of a Linux server over expensive Windows systems are numerous with hardly any drawbacks. Since Linux is not dominant as Windows, there are some slight difficulties to find applications based on this platform to support the needs. While security stands as an important aspect for servers, the advantage over dominant operating systems is that security flaws are caught in Linux, even before they become an issue for the public.

Linux was one of the first open-source technologies in which you can download the source code and change it any way you like. Several Linux coders have developed software that’s completely open-source for any user, improving the security and usability at each core.

Read more

Also: Weigh the pros, cons of three Linux load balancer options

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • SDDM 0.14.0
  • Kodi v17 “Krypton” Beta 1
  • Top 10 Time Tracking Software for Linux

    Just a few days ago we were presenting software for one of the most popular mainstream Linux distribution – Ubuntu. Now let’s cover the progenitor of all free and open-source software. Its operating system was released on October 5, 1991. The creator of Linux, Linus Torvalds, was only 22 years old at that time!

    Linux is not very popular on the desktop computers (at least among regular users, software engineers, for example, prefer to work on it), but it is the leading operating system on servers, mainframe computers, and virtually all fastest supercomputers. It is also worth mentioning that without Linux there won’t be no Android as we know it now, no network routers, video game consoles, and smartwatches. We really owe a lot to Mr. Linus.

    According to Wikipedia, the development of Linux is one of the most prominent examples of free and open-source software collaboration. Its source code may be used, modified and distributed—commercially or non-commercially—by anyone under the terms of its respective licenses. Thanks to it we can use some great software like the already mentioned Ubuntu, but also Fedora, Gentoo Linux, Debian and more.

  • MPTCP v0.91 Release

    The MPTCP v0.91 release is based on the Linux Kernel Longterm Support release v4.1.x.

  • Quick Updates: Guake 0.8.7, WebTorrent Desktop 0.12.0, TLP 0.9

    Guake is a drop-down terminal emulator for GNOME (GTK2). The application is inspired from consoles in computer games, such as Quake, in which the console slides from the top of the screen when a key is pressed. In the same way, Guake can be invoked and hidden using a single key (though Guake can also automatically hide when it loses focus).

  • Switch Between Multiple Lists Of Apps Pinned To Unity Launcher With `Launcher List Indicator`
  • MATE Dock Applet Gets Unity-Like Progress Bar And Badge Support

    MATE Dock Applet is a MATE Panel applet that displays running application windows as icons. The applet features options to pin applications to the dock, supports multiple workspaces, and can be added to any MATE Panel, regardless of size and orientation.

  • AppImage – One app framework to distro them all

    Linux is highly portable. Fact. On the other hand, Linux software is the least portable technology in the world. Try running Firefox designed for Debian on Fedora. In fact, try running Firefox designed for one version of Fedora on another Fedora, perhaps a slightly older version. Godspeed, Captain Jack Sparrow.

    The fanatical rigor with which the Linux backward compatibility is maintained in the enterprise flavors, SUSE and Red Hat, is inversely proportional to all other incompatibilities that exist in the Linux space. This ain’t no news. I have most artfully elaborated on this problem in my illustrated Linux guide. But now, there’s a thing that promises to solve all these problems forever. AppImage.

  • Substance Designer 5.5 Is Here

    This version takes texture creation into the big leagues with MDL material authoring – opening up a whole new world of materials – plus Linux support, fbx camera import and support for VCA. This is a free upgrade for license holders and Substance Live subscribers, or you can get a free 30-day trial version.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • 5 Cool Unikernels Projects

    Unikernels are poised to become the next big thing in microservices after Docker containers. Here’s a look at some of the cool things you can do with unikernels.

    First, though, here’s a quick primer on what unikernels are, for the uninitiated. Unikernels are similar to containers in that they let you run an app inside a portable, software-defined environment. But they go a step further than containers by packaging all of the libraries required to run the app directly into the unikernel.

  • Cedrus Is Making Progress On Open-Source Allwinner Video Encode/Decode

    The developers within the Sunxi camp working on better Allwinner SoC support under Linux have been reverse-engineering Allwinner's "Cedar" video engine. Their project is being called Cedrus with a goal of "100% libre and open-source" video decode/encode for the relevant Cedar hardware.

    The developers have been making progress and yesterday they published their initial patches that add a V4L2 decoder driver for the VPU found on Allwinner's A13 SoC.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.6 Milestone 3 Released For Linux Benchmarking
  • Calibre 2.65.1 eBook Viewer Adds Driver for Kobo Aura One and Aura 2 Readers

    Kovid Goyal released today, August 26, 2016, a new maintenance update of his popular, cross-platform, and open-source Calibre e-book viewer, converter and library management tool.

    Calibre 2.65 was announced earlier, and it looks like it's both a feature and bugfix release that adds drivers for the Kobo Aura One and Kobo Aura Edition 2 ebook readers, along with a new option to the Kobo driver to allow users to ignore certain collections on their ebook reader.

    The list of new features continues with support for right-to-left text and tables to the DOCX Input feature, as well as the implementation of a new option to allow users to make searching case-sensitive. This option can be found and enabled in the "Searching" configuration section under Preferences.

  • Calamares 2.4 Universal Installer Framework Polishes Existing Functionality

    A new stable version of the Calamares universal installer framework used by various GNU/Linux distributions as default graphical installer has been released with various improvements and bug fixes.

    Calamares 2.4 is now the latest build, coming two months after the release of the previous version, Calamares 2.3, which introduced full-disk encryption support. However, Calamares 2.4 is not as big as the previous update as it only polished existing functionality and address various annoying issues reported by users.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.400.2.0

    Another Armadillo 7.* release -- now at 7.400. We skipped the 7.300.* serie release as it came too soon after our most recent CRAN release. Releasing RcppArmadillo 0.7.400.2.0 now keeps us at the (roughly monthly) cadence which works as a good compromise between getting updates out at Conrad's sometimes frantic pace, while keeping CRAN (and Debian) uploads to about once per month.

    So we may continue the pattern of helping Conrad with thorough regression tests by building against all (by now 253 (!!)) CRAN dependencies, but keeping release at the GitHub repo and only uploading to CRAN at most once a month.

  • Spotio Is A Light Skin for Spotify’s Desktop App — And Its Coming To Linux

    Spotify’s dark design is very much of its identity. No-matter the platform you use it on, the dark theme is there staring back at you. Until now. A bunch of ace websites, blogs and people I follow have spent the past 24 hours waxing lyrical over a new Spotify skin called Spotio.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • GNOME Music 3.22 to Offer Better Sorting of Songs in Albums and Artists Views

    GNOME Music 3.22 is on its way, as well as the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, due for release next month on September 21, and it looks like we're now able to get an early taste of what's coming in GNOME's default music playback app.

    GNOME Music 3.22 Beta has been released, distributed as part of the first Beta development milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, and it promises to offer better sorting of tracks in the Artists and Albums views, a "new playlist" entry to the Playlist dialog, and new keyboard shortcuts.

  • bitmath-1.3.1 released

    bitmath is a Python module I wrote which simplifies many facets of interacting with file sizes in various units as python objects. A few weeks ago version 1.3.1 was released with a few small updates.

  • NetworkManager 1.4 Released
  • NetworkManager 1.4: with better privacy and easier to use

    After we released version 1.0 of NetworkManager, it took us sixteen months to reach the 1.2 milestone. This means that it took over a year for some newly added features to reach the user base. Now we are releasing the next major release after just four months.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • MKVToolNix 9.4 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Polishes Existing Functionality

    MKVToolNix creator Moritz Bunkus proudly announced the release of MKVToolNix 9.4.0, the latest stable and most advanced build of the open-source and free MKV (Matroska) manipulation software for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows OSes.

    Dubbed Knurl, MKVToolNix 9.4.0 is not a major release, and there aren't many improvements added to its core components. Instead, this maintenance update tries to polish existing functionality and address a few of the issues reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.3.1. Also, it comes with a warning for package maintainers who reported issues when compiling the app against libEBML 1.3.4 and libMatroska 1.4.5.

  • 4 Cloud-based Applications that Work Perfectly on Linux

    As far as cloud-based applications go, the market seems to be very competitive. With the recent OneDrive controversy, users are becoming much more conscious about how and where they invest their valuable data. Pricing changes or changes in business models have started to backfire against companies pretty quickly. In other words, cloud-based applications are no longer second-class citizens on the desktop. In fact, they have become a solid business model that big companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple heavily rely on.

    Now that the cloud has become an end-user commodity rather than a product that was meant for data giants, companies are trying hard to increase the outreach of their cloud services to clients across all platforms. One such attempt is to bring more Linux users to the party by treating Linux-based desktops at the same level as their Windows and Mac counterparts. Many cloud-focused companies have already made available well-supported Linux clients for their services. This, in turn, has made Linux as a lucrative platform for people who dual boot or switch their computers a lot. That way, they can enjoy all their important files on Windows at work and Linux at home. It's a win-win situation for both parties.

    Today, we will be focusing on a few such cloud-based applications that work natively on Linux without any major glitches or bugs.

  • The Forecast Isn’t Looking Bright For GNOME Weather

    GNOME Weather is no longer able to display weather forecasts.

  • This App Lets You Set-Up And Configure Razer Keyboards on Linux

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Summary

    And so, GSoC has come to an end. In this post, I'm going to describe what I have done in the past 13 weeks.

  • The State of Wayland's GSoC Project For Improved Output Handling

    Google's annual Summer of Code 2016 (GSoC) is now officially over and we're starting to see the final reports issued by the many student developers involved. One of the reports worth mentioning is the Wayland project around getting Weston to start without any outputs and improved output handling.

    Student developer Armin Krezović was getting his feet wet with Wayland this summer and was led b

  • GSoC with Pitivi
  • GUADEC Experience

    In this blog post, I will be sharing my GUADEC experience which recently held from 11-Aug-2015 to 17-Aug-2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany. I actually got to see the faces behind IRC nicks, met most of developers and people from GNOME community and also most importantly, GUADEC helped me to meet my Google Summer of Code mentor Debarshi Ray in person which was just great.

  • GNOME Usability Test Results (Part 1)

    This is the first part of analysis for the usability test I recently conducted, with the purpose to uncover usability flaws of two GNOME applications: Photos and Calendar.
    For this part I am focusing on visualizing the results, demographics and talk more about the methodology I used for testing. We will take a closer look on how testers performed on every task given, using a heat map. Hopefully this will create a clear picture of the testing process and help to “get to know” the participants and understand them better!

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/33

    Week 33 brought us again 5 snapshots (0812, 0813, 0815, 0816 and 0817). There were some smaller and bigger updates, as usual.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Powerful Rhythmbox 3.4 Music Player Arrives with New Web Remote Control Plugin

    Rhythmbox developer Jonathan Matthew announced the release of the Rhythmbox 3.4 open-source music player and organizer software for GNU/Linux operating systems, a version that introduces several enhancements and a bunch of bugfixes.

    The biggest new features of Rhythmbox 3.4 are a new plugin that promises to let users remotely control the application via a web browser, a much-improved SoundCloud plugin that now fetches more search results and supports pausing, and the playback keyboard shortcuts were slightly improved.

  • How to organize your scholarly research with Docear

    The Docear academic literature suite blends Freeplane and JabRef to make a comprehensive academic paper-writing application, with support for mind-mapping, citations, notes, and many other features.

    Writing a major scholarly paper can be a daunting undertaking. Turning a collection of scholarly research into a coherent paper requires a great deal of organizing and planning. To simplify that task, there are many tools available to assist a researcher with keeping track of their bibliographic citations, and there are also plenty of tools to help a user organize their thoughts. Often those programs are distinct pieces of software that do not always work well together. One exception to this Docear, a single, well integrated, tool that handles mind-mapping, works as a citation manager, and does even more.

    Docear describes itself as "The Academic Literature Suite," and works by combining the Freeplane mind-mapping software and the JabRef reference manager into a single cohesive tool. By leveraging the power of these two open source applications, Docear creates something that is greater than the sum of its parts. Researchers can keep track of their citations and notes, and easily include them when mapping the structure of their paper. Docear provides a single platform that can support almost every aspect of the research process.

  • AppRecommender - Last GSoC Report

    My work on Google Summer of Code is to create a new strategy on AppRecommender, where this strategy should be able to get a referenced package, or a list of referenced packages, then analyze the packages that the user has already installed and make a recommendation using the referenced packages as a base, for example: if the user runs "$ sudo apt install vim", the AppRecommender uses "vim" as the referenced package, and should recommend packages with relation between "vim" and the other packages that the user has installed. This work is done and added to the official AppRecommender repository.

  • Simple Weather Indicator Adds Hide Location, Temperature Rounding Options

    Another month, another update to the simple weather indicator we first featured back in July.

Wine 1.8.4 Released

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Software
  • Wine 1.8.4 Released With Bug Fixes, Updated GPU Table

    For those using the Wine 1.8 stable series until the Wine 2.0 release this fall/winter and not opting to use the bi-weekly Wine 1.9 development releases, Wine 1.8.4 was released today.

    Wine 1.8.4 ships with a total of 50 known bug fixes for this stable release update. There are also more graphics cards added to their GPU description table for identifying a GPU's capabilities under Wine.

  • Wine 1.8.4 Adds Support for More GPUs, Fixes 64-bit Mortal Kombat X Crash

    Last week we told you all about the new improvements and fixes implemented in the Wine 1.9.17 development release, and now it's time to inform our readers about the latest stable Wine release, version 1.8.4.

  • Wine 1.8.4 Released

    The Wine maintenance release 1.8.4 is now available.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • mutt 1.7.0 released
  • Vim 8 pre-announcement

    Work on Vim 8.0 is coming close to an end. I hope version 8.0 can be released in about two weeks.

    This is a last chance to modify new features in a way that is not backwards compatible. Once 8.0 is out we can’t make changes that would break plugins.

  • digiKam 5.x Photography Application Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    digiKam is digital photo management application for specially designed for KDE desktop environment. Digital photo management program designed to import, organize, enhance, search and export your digital images to and from your computer. It provides a simple interface which makes importing and organizing digital photographs a "snap". The photos are organized in albums which can be sorted chronologically, by folder layout or by custom collections. digiKam enables you to manage large numbers of digital photographs in albums and to organize these photographs for easy retrieval using tags (keywords), captions, collections, dates, geolocation and searches. It has many features for viewing, organizing, processing and sharing your images. Thus, digiKam is a formidable digital asset management (DAM) software including powerful image editing functions. An easy-to-use camera interface is provided, that will connect to your digital camera and download photographs directly into digiKam albums. More than 1000 digital cameras are supported by the gphoto2 library. Of course, any media or card reader supported by your operating system will interface with digiKam.

  • 5 Tools for Monitoring Disk Activity in Linux
  • What is BPF and why is it taking over Linux Performance Analysis?

    The newest tool for observing the Linux operating system is the “Berkeley Packet Filter” (BPF). BPF allows users to run a small piece of code quickly and safely inside the operating system. Originally used for packet filtering, it has since been enhanced from its eponymous use-case to support dynamic tracing of the Linux operating system. For example, it is possible to write a small BPF program that prints every time a particular file was accessed by a user.

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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more