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Software

Software: Chronobreak, ClipGrab, and Tracealyzer

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Software
  • Chronobreak – An Open-Source Pomodoro Timer Alternative

    Fitting in too many tasks within a short space of time could be daunting, but productivity timers make things a lot easier. These timers ensure users are focused by breaking up their tasks into scalable bits and fitting in resting periods at pre-determined intervals.

    We have written on such apps before including Gnome Pomodoro and Take a Break. So today, we bring you yet another and it goes by the name of Chronobreak.

    Chronobreak is new and is geared towards making timing tasks easier and more productive for its users. It is an open-source productivity timer created using Electron, and it uses the Pomodoro technique – a technique that allows users break down their tasks into time intervals so that they can take breaks in-between.

  • ClipGrab: Video Downloader and Converter Updated for Ubuntu/Linux Mint (PPA)

    ClipGrab is a free software to download and convert videos from different famous sites of Internet. You can easily save your favorite videos from sites like Dailymotion or Vimeo. And you can convert these videos into "usable" formats like WMV, MPEG or MP3. You can check here which sites are supported by this software.
    It can convert videos to WMV, MPEG4, OGG Theora, MP3 (audio only), OGG Vorbis (audio only) or simply download videos in their original format. However, downloading from some sites doesn't allow you to select other format from drop-down menu, it could be issue with site videos.

  • Tracealyzer 4.2 With New Trace View, Support for Linux

    Percepio, the leader in software trace visualization for embedded systems and IoT, today announced Tracealyzer version 4.2. The new release features a completely rewritten main trace view, and adds support for, among other things, Wittenstein SafeRTOS and tracing via STLINK debug probes. It also brings official support for running on Linux, so developers using Linux hosts are now able to upgrade to the new generation of Tracealyzer.

Nextcloud 14 and Video Verification

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Software

Today the Nextcloud community released Nextcloud 14. This release comes with a ton of improvements in the areas of User Experience, Accessibility, Speed, GDPR compliance, 2 Factor Authentication, Collaboration, Security and many other things. You can find an overview here

But there is one feature I want to highlight because I find it especially noteworthy and interesting. Some people ask us why we are doing more than the classic file sync and share. Why do we care about Calendar, Contacts, Email, Notes, RSS Reader, Deck, Chat, Video and audio calls and so on.

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Official press release: Nextcloud 14 now available with Video Verification, Signal/Telegram 2FA support, Improved Collaboration and GDPR compliance

Nano 3.0 Released! Reads Files 70% Faster

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GNU
Software

A new major release of open source text editor GNU nano is here. GNU nano 3.0 reads files 70% faster and brings several other features.s

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Open Hardware/Modding/Hacking

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Hardware
Software
OSS
  • Libre Computer's Tritium Is A Line Of Low-Cost Allwinner ARM Boards

    In addition to Le Potato and Renegade, another line-up of ARM boards being offered by Libre Computer is Tritium. The Libre Computer Tritium boards are Allwinner-based boards with options from the H2+ for IoT use-cases, the H3 as a mid-range offering, or H5 for a better-performing ARM board that is well supported by the open-source Linux community.

  • See Binary On Your Breadboard

    When you’re debugging a board which has an ESP32, Raspberry Pi, or Arduino, it’s easy to slap on a small LCD display or connect via WiFi to see what’s wrong. At least, that’s what the kids are doing. But what if you’re old-school or you don’t have one of those pimped-out, steroid-filled boards? A resistor and an LED will often suffice. Powering the LED means one thing and not powering it means another. And with seven more LEDs you can even display 0-256 in binary.

    [Miguel] is clearly in the latter camp. To make debugging-with-LEDs easy, he’s come up with an 8-LED board complete with resistors. He’s even included the Gerber files needed for you to make your own. One row of pins are all connected together and the other row are not. So whether you’re using common cathode or common anode depends on how you orient the LEDs when you solder them in place. You might perhaps have one board of each type at the ready.

  • Ancient Hardware I Have Hacked: Back to Basics!

    My return to the IBM mainframe was delayed by my high school's acquisition of a a teletype connected via a 110-baud serial line to a timesharing system featuring the BASIC language. I was quite impressed with this teletype because it could type quite a bit faster than I could. But this is not as good as it might sound, given that I came in dead last in every test of manual dexterity that the school ever ran us through. In fact, on a good day, I might have been able to type 20 words a minute, and it took decades of constant practice to eventually get above 70 words a minute. In contrast, one of the teachers could type 160 words a minute, more than half again faster than the teletype could!

    Aside from output speed, I remained unimpressed with computers compared to paper and pencil, let alone compared to my pocket calculator. And given that this was old-school BASIC, there was much to be unimpressed about. You could name your arrays anything you wanted, as long as that name was a single upper-case character. Similarly, you could name your scalar variables anything you wanted, as long as that name was either a single upper-case character or a single upper-case character followed by a single digit. This allowed you to use up to 286 variables, up to 26 of which could be arrays. If you felt that GOTO was harmful, too bad. If you wanted a while loop, you could make one out of IF statements. Not only did IF statements have no else clause, the only thing that could be in the THEN clause was the number of the line to which control would transfer when the IF condition evaluated to true. And each line had to be numbered, and the numbers had to be monotonically increasing, that is, in the absence of control-flow statements, the program would execute the lines of code in numerical order, regardless of the order in which you typed those lines of code. Definitely a step down, even from FORTRAN.

  • Guile-CV version 0.2.0

    This is a 'milestone' release, which introduces image texture measures. In addition (a) the default installation locations have changed; (Cool there is a new configure option; (c) some new interfaces; (d) matrix multiplication performances have been greatly improved; (d) a few interface (name) have changed.

    For a list of changes since the previous version, visit the NEWS file. For a complete description, consult the git summary and git log

Software: Xournal, Dat, and Google Chrome 69

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Software
  • Edit PDFs with Xournal

    Somehow, despite all the issues with proprietary clients and the history of security issues with Acrobat, PDFs have become the de facto standard for your average print-ready document shared around the office. Sure, people might use some kind of open document format or a cloud editor if they intend to edit a document, but if the goal is to print the document or lock its contents in place, most people these days will export it to a PDF.

    Reading PDFs is typically fine on Linux, because Linux has plenty of applications that can open PDFs for viewing, and you easily can print PDFs under Linux as well. Even Adobe supplied a proprietary (and somewhat outdated) port of its Acrobat Reader for Linux. Some distributions also offer the ability to create a special software printer that converts any print job sent to it into a local PDF file.

  • Sharing and archiving data sets with Dat

    Dat 2.0 was released in June 2017 with performance improvements and protocol changes. Dat Enhancement Proposals (DEPs) guide the project's future development; most work is currently geared toward implementing the draft "multi-writer proposal" in HyperDB. Without multi-writer support, only the original publisher of a Dat can modify it. According to Joe Hand, co-executive-director of Code for Science & Society (CSS) and Dat core developer, in an IRC chat, "supporting multiwriter is a big requirement for lots of folks". For example, while Dat might allow Alice to share her research results with Bob, he cannot modify or contribute back to those results. The multi-writer extension allows for Alice to assign trust to Bob so he can have write access to the data.

    Unfortunately, the current proposal doesn't solve the "hard problems" of "conflict merges and secure key distribution". The former will be worked out through user interface tweaks, but the latter is a classic problem that security projects have typically trouble finding solutions for—Dat is no exception. How will Alice securely trust Bob? The OpenPGP web of trust? Hexadecimal fingerprints read over the phone? Dat doesn't provide a magic solution to this problem.

    Another thing limiting adoption is that Dat is not packaged in any distribution that I could find (although I requested it in Debian) and, considering the speed of change of the JavaScript ecosystem, this is unlikely to change any time soon. A Rust implementation of the Dat protocol has started, however, which might be easier to package than the multitude of Node.js modules. In terms of mobile device support, there is an experimental Android web browser with Dat support called Bunsen, which somehow doesn't run on my phone. Some adventurous users have successfully run Dat in Termux. I haven't found an app running on iOS at this point.

  • Here’s What’s New in Google Chrome 69

    Chrome 69, which marks the browser’s 10-year anniversary, is a huge release. The slick new theme is the most visible change, but there are more new features. For example, you can now personalize Chrome’s New Tab page with background images and custom shortcuts.

    [...]

    While Chrome 69 offers a significant visual change, Google updates Chrome every six weeks with new features, security updates, and bug fixes. Previous versions of Chrome have had some big changes, too.

    The most important one you should know about is Chrome’s built-in adblocker. Chrome now automatically blocks ads on websites that use obnoxious ads like auto-playing videos with audio and huge banners that block your screen.

  • Chrome 70 Retrying For AV1 Decoding, Full Support For TLS 1.3 & Priority Hints

    With Chrome 69 out the door and that having marked Chrome's 10th birthday, Google developers have Chrome 70 in their dev channel fresh out of the oven.

    Google has promoted the latest Chrome 70 build to their dev channel. There are new features, security updates, and the never ending stream of bug fixes.

Desktop/Server Software: ANGRYsearch, Cockpit, SoftMaker and Mesa

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
  • ANGRYsearch – A Fast File Search Tool for Linux Desktops

    ANGRYsearch was created to fill the space that the famous Everything Search Engine did not fill in the Linux community. It functions as a system-wide search tool that instantly populates its results fields as you type. It is written in python 3 with its GUI created with PyQt5.

    ANGRYsearch can be configured to use either a Lite or Full mode. The lite mode displays only file names and paths while the full mode includes the size and modification date.

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 177

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 177.

  • SoftMaker Premium Office Suite is Now Free for Educational Institutes and Teachers [Ed: Proprietary is bad. Proprietary is to be avoided. When they try to get students 'addicted' to it (like Adobe and Microsoft do) they show just how malicious they are.]

    There are many great FOSS and even proprietary office suites available for the Linux desktop. Whether you use LibreOffice, WPS, OpenOffice, Calligra, or ONLYOFFICE, you can always find something that suits your needs.

    In fact, as Linux users, we are spoiled. Apart from native Microsoft Office support, we pretty much have access to all of the best office suites there are. We can even stick to Microsoft’s ecosystem via Microsoft Online if we so choose, and on top of that, we obviously have access to Google’s office suite.

    [...]

    Since SoftMaker is not FOSS, I prefer to use LibreOffice. 

    [...]

    The only issue I have come across in my time using SoftMaker is the fact that it is proprietary.

  • mesa 18.2.0-rc6

    Hello list,

    The sixth release candidate for the Mesa 18.2.0 is now available. This is the final planned RC.

  • Mesa 18.2-RC6 Released, Final Expected On Friday

    Mesa 18.2 as the third-quarter feature update for this collection of primarily Vulkan/OpenGL drivers is expected to make its official debut on Friday.

    After being delayed by a short time due to open blocker bugs, those bugs were addressed. A sixth and final release candidate is now out there for those wishing to engage in last minute testing of the driver stack.

Essential LaTeX Tools – typeset beautifully (Updated 2018)

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Software

LaTeX is a document preparation system and document markup language for high-quality typesetting. The system was originally developed by Leslie Lamport in the early 1980s. LaTeX is based on Donald E. Knuth’s TeX typesetting language. Lamport says that LaTeX “represents a balance between functionality and ease of use”.

LaTeX is often used for technical or scientific documentation, particularly because it generates well formatted papers with beautifully crafted formulae, but the system can be used for any form of publishing. It employs beautifully crafted typesetting algorithms. Academic journals will often accept submission in this format.

Using the LaTeX system leads the author to concentrate on the structure of the document rather than its appearance. The author therefore focuses on what he/she wants to say, instead of fretting over page borders, font attributes, or formatting. Moreover, the author will be guided in the organisation, structure, and flow within the document.

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Also: curl 7.61.1 comes with only bug-fixes

Software: Rclone, Stellarium Web, Kiwi TCMS 5.3.1

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Software
  • Cloud Storage Sync Tool Rclone 1.43 Includes New Jottacloud Backend, Reworked Configuration

    Rclone is a command line program used to synchronize files and folders to and from multiple cloud storage services, including Amazon Drive, Amazon S3, Google Drive, Google Cloud Storage, Dropbox, Microsoft oneDrive, Microsoft Azure Blob Storage, ownCloud, Nextcloud, DigitalOcean Spaces, and many others (WebDAV and SFTP are also supported). The tool is free and open source software, and is available on multiple platforms, including Linux, Windows, macOS, *BSD, and Solaris.

  • Track the Stars From Your Browser With Stellarium Web

    Like stargazing? Stellarium, the open source astronomy software used by universities all over the world, now runs in your browser.

    Head to stellarium-web.org right now to check out what’s in the sky above you. This is a stripped down version of the desktop and mobile version, but you don’t need to install anything. This means you can quickly reference it on any device, even one you’re borrowing.

  • Kiwi TCMS 5.3.1

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 5.3.1! This release brings lots of UI updates and removal of unused and/or duplicated functionality and source code. Many pages have been redesigned with the Patternfly library to have a modern look and feel which you can experience at https://demo.kiwitcms.org.

Proprietary: VMware Workstation 14 and Victory At Sea Pacific

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Software

6 Most Awesome Quick File Searching Tools for Linux Desktop

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Software

Over the years we have covered some of the best file searching tools for the Linux desktop and till date, the titles that we covered remain the most sought out for by users.

Today, we bring you a compiled list of the 6 most awesome so that you don’t have to do all that work yourself any longer.

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Linux firewalls: What you need to know about iptables and firewalld

A firewall is a set of rules. When a data packet moves into or out of a protected network space, its contents (in particular, information about its origin, target, and the protocol it plans to use) are tested against the firewall rules to see if it should be allowed through. Here’s a simple example... Read more

Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

  • Fedora Firefox – GCC/CLANG dilemma
    After reading Mike’s blog post about official Mozilla Firefox switch to LLVM Clang, I was wondering if we should also use that setup for official Fedora Firefox binaries. The numbers look strong but as Honza Hubicka mentioned, Mozilla uses pretty ancient GCC6 to create binaries and it’s not very fair to compare it with up-to date LLVM Clang 6. Also if I’m reading the mozilla bug correctly the PGO/LTO is not yet enabled for Linux, only plain optimized builds are used for now…which means the transition at Mozilla is not so far than I expected.
  • September 2018 CA Communication
    Mozilla has sent a CA Communication to inform Certification Authorities (CAs) who have root certificates included in Mozilla’s program about current events relevant to their membership in our program and to remind them of upcoming deadlines. This CA Communication has been emailed to the Primary Point of Contact (POC) and an email alias for each CA in Mozilla’s program, and they have been asked to respond to the following 7 action items:
  • Emily Dunham: CFP tricks 1
    Some strategies I’ve recommended in the past for dealing with this include looking at the conference’s marketing materials to imagine who they would interest, and examining the abstracts of past years’ talks.

today's howtos

Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
  • This New CSS Attack Restarts iPhones & Freezes Macs
  • Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Containers After Package Manager Patch
  • GrrCon 2018 Augusta15 Automation and Open Source Turning the Tide on Attackers John Grigg