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Software

Proprietary Software and DRM

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Software
  • Beware the looming Google Chrome HTTPS certificate apocalypse!

    Thanks to a decision in September by Google to stop trusting Symantec-issued SSL/TLS certs, from mid-April Chrome browser users visiting websites using a certificate from the security biz issued before June 1, 2016 or after December 1, 2017 will be warned that their connection is not private and someone may be trying to steal their information. They will have to click past the warning to get to the website.

    This will also affect certs that use Symantec as their root of trust even if they were issued by an intermediate organization. For example, certificates handed out by Thawte, GeoTrust, and RapidSSL that rely on Symantec will be hit by Google's crackdown. If in doubt, check your cert's root certificate authority to see if it's Symantec or not.

  • Watch Netflix in 1080p on Linux and unsupported browsers

    In fact, the only browsers that support 1080p playback on Netflix officially are Safari on Mac OS X, Internet Explorer on Windows, and Google Chrome on Chrome OS. That's bad news if you don't use any of the operating systems or prefer to use a different browser.

  • Station – A Smart Workstation for All Your Apps

    Today, we bring you a similar app and this one is bold enough to tag itself the “first smart workstation for busy people“. It goes by the name of Station, a free web app that combines all your web apps in one neat & productive User Interface.

  • Skype Now Easier To Install On Linux Desktop

Software: Kodi, MPV, Comparison of Software, Elisa and Auryo

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Software
  • Kodi v18 Leia - The story so far

    Around November 2017 the team decided that v17 Krypton was mature enough to start with the release steps and as such it was branched off from our main development tree. This basically means it received its own place in our development repository and would only receive bug fixes and small improvements. This is also the moment that frees up the possibility for several core developers to start another cleanup and improvement spree that was also done when just starting with v17. This usually entails to take a more evasive steps on cleaning up code and less taking in account that certain parts will be broken for a certain time. Having a good foundation to build on is key in anything and that also includes a software application.

  • The Current State Of Kodi 18 Development

    Kodi developers have written a blog post outlining their work so far on Kodi 18 "Leia", which should be out at some point this year but with no formal release schedule yet.

  • MPV, the Command Line Video Player, is Considering a GUI

    Command line video player MPV may soon have an official GUI. 

    Vincent Lang, the lead developer of the MPV media player project, has suggested the tool adopts one of the community-made MPV GUI front-ends available.

    The reason?

    To make MPV more accessible.

  • Comparison of Software in Ubuntu and Windows

    This is a list of software for Ubuntu user switching from MS Windows. This list compares free software in Ubuntu with nonfree software in Windows for everyone. This list translates what people commonly use in Windows to Ubuntu, for example, you install LibreOffice in Ubuntu to replace MS Office in Windows. All programs for Ubuntu here are available in Ubuntu repository and can be installed easily. Although this list is designed for Ubuntu, anyone can use this for another GNU/Linux distros such as Trisquel and Kubuntu.

  • Last Weeks Activity in Elisa

    Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

    We focus on a very good integration with the Plasma desktop of the KDE community without compromising the support for other platforms (other Linux desktop environments, Windows and Android).

  • Auryo – A Cross-Platform Desktop Client for SoundCloud

    For the longest time, it seemed that those of us who are both Linux & SoundCloud users would be forever cursed with having to use a Web browser on our desktops in order to enjoy the application. But I bring you great news!

    There is now an unofficial desktop client for SoundCloud and it goes by the name of Auryo. Gone are the days when you were forced to use a browser to stream Soundcloud content. Now it is a scroll and a click away.

Software: VLC 3, Proxmox, Screenshots, Qvisqve

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Software
  • Finally: VLC 3

    It took the VideoLAN developers several years of development to leave the ageing v2 releases of their VLC player behind and release a shiny new version ‘3’. This is also the first version which unifies the releases for all platforms the player can run on.
    Lots of changes went under the hood and I encourage you to read the release notes. The new release contains working ChromeCast support using a software stack the developers wrote from scratch, where the video’s you cast are transcoded on the fly if necessary. The UPnP support which was broken for many years, has been re-written and finally works again, so that you can watch the movies you make available on your LAN using for instance Plex or Universal Media Server.

  • Proxmox virtualization manage

    A strange trend has surfaced in which everyone suddenly wants to use OpenStack, even if it is only to manage a few virtual machines (VMs). OpenStack projects that are launched without any other motivation typically disappear again very quickly, especially when the company realizes the overhead it is taking on with OpenStack.

    Without a doubt, if you only want to manage a few VMs, you are significantly better off with a typical virtualization manager than with a tool designed to support the operation of a public cloud platform. Although classic VM managers are wallflowers compared with the popular cloud solutions, they still exist and are very successful. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) enjoys a popularity similar to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 12, to which you can add extensions for high availability (HA) and which supports alternative storage solutions.

  • Tools for GNU/Linux: Third party screenshot utilities

    I take screenshots more than I do real photos, and I’m a reporter for my college newspaper, as well as have my portfolio etc. That said, I’ve had my share of ups and downs with different software, and have come to find two programs that adore, when using a GNU/Linux system; Shutter and Gyazo.

    Both of these programs take screenshots, and do various things with them, but they are drastically different and therefore serve quite different purpose in why I use them.

    Shutter, I tend to use when writing articles, or any work that requires me to need the screenshot on my local drive, perhaps to be emailed off or uploaded somewhere. Gyazo, I use when I need to quickly send a screenshot of a funny thing that happened in a game, or of something I found on a website, or anything where it’s just “Hey take a look at this!”

  • Qvisqve - an authorisation server, first alpha release

    My company, QvarnLabs Ab, has today released the first alpha version of our new product, Qvisqve. Below is the press release. I wrote pretty much all the code, and it's free software (AGPL+).

Software: Nautilus, Python IDEs, Persepolis, Signal

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Software
  • Nautilus team grown – It’s my pleasure to welcome Ernestas Kulik as co-maintainer

    Becoming a maintainer of a FOSS project is not easy. It requires much more than just code skills. It’s about responsibility, product management, vision, community and hard work in long-term.

    Becoming a maintainer of a FOSS project like Nautilus is even harder, it requires a sense of what being used by millions of people and delivering to business entitles. It also requires understanding the complexity of a file manager, and the old code that lies behind.

    Now, becoming maintainer of a project that already has a maintainer working full time on it… that’s a different level.

  • 8 Best Python IDEs for Linux Programmers

    Python is a general-purpose programming language for building anything; from backend web development, data analysis, artificial intelligence to scientific computing. It can also be used for developing productivity software, games, desktop apps and beyond.

    It’s easy to learn, has a clean syntax and indentation structure. And an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) can, to some extend, determine ones programming experience when it comes to learning or developing using any language.

  • A Short Guide to Persepolis Download Manager

    Persepolis is a very good replacement to Internet Download Manager (IDM) for GNU/Linux. Persepolis Download manager (PDM) is free software, with high-speed downloading, with nice user interface similar to IDM, and integration to web browser. Persepolis supports scheduling and bulk downloading as well. This guide is a short tutorial covering how to install Persepolis, downloading files and videos with it, and finally bulk downloading, basically things everyone needs the most out of a download manager. So, give it a try and be happy!

  • Signal – Fast, Simple and Secure Multi-Platform Instant Messaging App

    Signal is a well encrypted and open-source instant messaging application and it is available for Android, iOS, Windows, GNU/Linux, and macOS.

    It features a clean and modern design (which is either mostly minimalist or flat design these days). Its controls are easy to access and it has a familiar working environment across platforms so users will not find it difficult to use.

Software: Audacity, Cryptomator, VLC, Corydalis, RcppEigen, Cockpit, Flowblade

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Software
  • Audacity – An Ideal App for Multi-Track Recording & Editing

    Great history is always made whenever the greats rub minds together. In some cases, it is a groundbreaking finding in chemistry or biology. In some others, it is the solution to problems that impeded our technological advancements using computers.

    In this case, it is the release of a free open-source digital audio and recording computer software application for Windows, GNU/Linux, and OS X – Audacity. It was built by Roger Dannenberg and Dominic Mazzoni at Carnie Mellon university, around fall, in the years 1999-2000.

  • Cryptomator - Encrypt your Cloud Data Files on Linux

    Figuring out a good path to security for your cloud data can be quite a challenge. Normally, the cloud is a very safe place for data, despite Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD) from those who might want to access their data everywhere anytime. But the security is a very problem so we need to use some tools or methods in other to prevent the risks. This is why you can use some tools like cryptomator to encrypt your data files.

  • VLC 3.0 Should Be Out By The End Of The Week

    The long sought after VLC 3.0 multimedia player release will be here anytime now.

    VLC 3.0.0 was already tagged in Git and the final preparations are underway in putting out this major update to the open-source, cross-platform media player.

    The VLC project expects to officially announce v3.0 by the end of the week, but considering how long this release cycle has been drawn out, it wouldn't surprise me if it becomes a few extra days.

  • Releasing Corydalis

    So, without further ado, … wait, I already said everything! Corydalis v0.2.0 (a rather arbitrarily chosen version number) is up on GitHub.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.3.4.0

    A new minor release 0.3.3.4.0 of RcppEigen hit CRAN earlier today, and just went to Debian as well. It brings Eigen 3.3.4 to R.

  • Cockpit 161

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 161.

  • Screencasts on Linux, part 2

    Well, no more, it seems. I seem to have missed a beautiful, functional, easy to use, and relatively fast one, called Flowblade.

    I had never heard of it, and I haven’t seen it mentioned on any of the sites I looked for video editing software reviews on. I only ran into it while browsing the available Flatpaks on Flathub. However, it has been in development for a couple of years, and it’s development seems active, though a bit dependent on a single coder.

    Having said that, I tip my hat to that single coder, who goes by the name of jliljebl, because this software is A-MA-ZING!

11 Excellent Free Scorewriters – Compose, arrange, print, and publish music

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Software

A scorewriter (often known as notation software or music notation processor) is software used with a computer for creating, editing and printing sheet music.

For a musician to be able to read, understand, and play music, a composition needs to be in written form. A system of notation is essential for musicians to be able to play music as intended by the composer.

In the field of music composition, Sibelius and Finale are held in high esteem. These scorewriters are widely used by composers, songwriters, and arrangers for creating sheet music, including the score for an ensemble and parts for individual musicians. Unfortunately, both Sibelius and Finale are proprietary software. They are very expensive applications; the cheapest perpetual license for Sibelius sets you back a princely £500. And neither application is available for Linux.

Fortunately, there is a wide range of open source scorewriters which are supported in Linux. This article recommends cost-effective alternatives to Sibelius and Finale. The software featured here is released under freely distributable licenses, all are available to download at no charge, and generate music scores which are engraved with traditional layout rules.

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3 command-line tools for feigning productivity

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Software

If you ever spent time growing up watching spy thrillers, action flicks, or crime movies, you developed a clear picture in your mind of what a hacker's computer screen looked like. Rows upon rows of rapidly moving code, streams of grouped hexadecimal numbers flying past like raining code in The Matrix.

Perhaps there's a world map with flashing points of light and a few rapidly updating charts thrown in there for good measure. And probably a 3D rotating geometric shape, because why not? If possible, this is all shown on a ridiculous number of monitors in an ergonomically uncomfortable configuration. I think Swordfish sported seven.

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New Linux User? Try These 8 Great Essential Linux Apps

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GNU
Linux
Software

When you are new to Linux, even if you are not new to computers in general, one of the problems you will face is which apps to use. With millions of Linux apps, the choice is certainly not easy. Below you will find eight (out of millions) essential Linux apps to get you settled in quickly.

Most of these apps are not exclusive to Linux. If you have used Windows/Mac before, chances are you are familiar with some of them. Depending on what your needs and interests are, you might not need all these apps, but in my opinion, most or all of the apps on this list are useful for newbies who are just starting out on Linux.

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Also: Missing Microsoft Office? Try SoftMaker Office 2018 for Linux

Software: Papyrus, Gnocchi, MenuLibre

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Software
  • Papyrus – A Different Note Manager with Better Security

    Papyrus is an open-source and multi-platform base note manager with a primary focus on social features and privacy. It is developed by Aseman, the same company behind Cutegram, an excellent alternative to Telegram’s desktop client for Linux.

    It prides itself on being smart, easy, secure, modern, and different; with a User Interface that is user-friendly and will be intuitive enough for anybody to install the app and get on with creating, syncing, and sharing notes.

  • Gnocchi 4.2 release

    The time of the release arrived. A little more than three months have passed since the latest minor version, 4.1, has been released. There are tons of improvement and a few nice significant features in this release!

  • MenuLibre 2.1.5 Released

    With improved support for Budgie, KDE, and MATE desktop environments, MenuLibre 2.1.5 continues to provide one of the best menu editing experiences for the Linux desktop.

  • MenuLibre 2.1.5 Menu Editor Adds Budgie & KDE Plasma Support

    MenuLibre is the menu editor program supporting FreeDesktop.org's Desktop Entry Specification and supports most desktop environments out there for customizations of their menus.

    Today's MenuLibre 2.1.5 release notably adds support for menu editing on the Budgie and KDE Plasma desktop environments. This adds to MenuLibre officially supporting GNOME, LXDE, LXQt, Pantheon, Unity, and Xfce.

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Software and Games: XenServer Clone, Rancher, GRV, Flatpak, Steam and Godot

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Software
Gaming
  • New Open Source Project Takes Aim at XenServer

    An initial Kickstarter campaign to raise $7,500 to begin development of a XenServer clone has already pulled in over $32,000.

  • Rancher – A Complete Container Management Platform For Production Environment

    Docker is a cutting-edge software used for containerization, that is used in most of IT companies to reduce infrastructure cost.

    By default docker comes without any GUI, which is easy for Linux administrator to manage it and it’s very difficult for developers to manage. When it’s come to production then it’s very difficult for Linux admin too. So, what would be the best solution to manage the docker without any trouble.

  • GRV - A Tool to View Git Repo from Linux Terminal

    GRV is an opensource tool to display git repository on Linux terminal. This tool provides screens to view refs, branches and diffs in separate tabs. The behaviour and style can be customized through configuration. A query language can be used to filter refs and commits. In this article, I will show GRV features and installation steps on Ubuntu 16.04.

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  • Flatpak, Steam Cloud, and XDG Base Directories

    If you’ve installed Steam on Linux through Flathub, chances are that Steam Auto-Cloud — Steam’s free game progress synchronization service — won’t work for many of your games that are built with the markets most popular game engines. I have dug into why it isn’t working, and discuss two possible solutions to fix the problem.

    Disclaimer: The Steam for Flatpak package on Flathub is a third-party community effort and isn’t endorsed nor supported by Valve Corporation.

    I’ll need to establish quite a bit of context regarding where games and applications store their configuration files and user data, and how they decide on where to store it. If you’re already familiar with the XDG Base Directory specification, you can glance at the tables and skip straight to the third section.

  • Open-source game dev tool Godot Engine adds VR support
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • State of Linux Containers
    In this video from the Stanford HPC Conference, Christian Kniep from Docker Inc. presents: State of Containers. “This talk will recap the history of and what constitutes Linux Containers, before laying out how the technology is employed by various engines and what problems these engines have to solve. Afterward, Christian will elaborate on why the advent of standards for images and runtimes moved the discussion from building and distributing containers to orchestrating containerized applications at scale. In conclusion, attendees will get an update on what problems still hinder the adoption of containers for distributed high performance workloads and how Docker is addressing these issues.”
  • ONS 2018: Networking Reimagined
    For the past seven years, Open Networking Summit (ONS) has brought together the networking industry’s ecosystem of network operators, vendors, open source projects, leading researchers, and investors to discuss the latest SDN and NFV developments that will shape the future of the networking industry. With this year’s event, taking place March 26-29, 2018 in Los Angeles, ONS will evolve its approach as the premier open source networking event. We’re excited to share three new aspects of this year’s ONS that you won’t want to miss:
  • AT&T contributes code to Linux open source edge computing project
    The Linux Foundation recently announced a new project, dubbed Akraino, to develop an open source software stack capable of supporting high-availability cloud services for edge computing systems and applications. To kick off the project, AT&T will contribute code made for carrier-scale edge computing applications running in virtual machines and containers.
  • AT&T Brings Akraino Networking Project to Edge of the Linux Foundation
    The Linux Foundation has been particularly busy in 2018 thus far consolidating its existing networking project under a single umbrella, known as LF Networking. That umbrella might need to get a bit larger, as on Feb. 20 the Linux Foundation announced the new Akraino project, with code coming initially from AT&T.
  • FreeOffice 2016 – An Efficient Alternative to Microsoft Office
    FreeOffice 2016 is the latest version of the Office software from SoftMaker. In fact, you wouldn’t be wrong if you called it the free version of SoftMaker Office 2018 seeing as it features the same suite of applications.
  • Stellaris 2.0 'Cherryh' patch & Stellaris: Apocalypse expansion released, over 1.5 million copies sold
    Stellaris: Apocalypse [Steam], the latest expansion for the grand space strategy game from Paradox Development Studio is out. The big 2.0 'Cherryh' patch is also now available. Paradox has also announced today, that Stellaris has officially passed 1.5 million copies sold making it one of their most popular games ever made. I'm not surprised by this, as I consider Stellaris their most accessible game.
  • Action-packed platformer with local and online co-op 'Vagante' has left Early Access
    After being in Early Access for quite some time, the action-packed platformer 'Vagante' [Steam, Official Site] has now officially left Early Access.
  • Gentoo has been accepted as a Google Summer of Code 2018 mentoring organization
  • Getting Debian booting on a Lenovo Yoga 720
    I recently got a new work laptop, a 13” Yoga 720. It proved difficult to install Debian on; pressing F12 would get a boot menu allowing me to select a USB stick I have EFI GRUB on, but after GRUB loaded the kernel and the initrd it would just sit there never outputting anything else that indicated the kernel was even starting. I found instructions about Ubuntu 17.10 which helped but weren’t the complete picture. What seems to be the situation is that the kernel won’t happily boot if “Legacy Support” is not enabled - enabling this (and still booting as EFI) results in a happier experience.
  • Dell PowerEdge T30
    I just did a Debian install on a Dell PowerEdge T30 for a client. The Dell web site is a bit broken at the moment, it didn’t list the price of that server or give useful specs when I was ordering it. I was under the impression that the server was limited to 8G of RAM, that’s unusually small but it wouldn’t be the first time a vendor crippled a low end model to drive sales of more expensive systems. It turned out that the T30 model I got has 4*DDR4 sockets with only one used for an 8G DIMM. It apparently can handle up to 64G of RAM.
  • Quad-Ethernet SBC and controller tap new Renesas RZ/N1D SoC
    Emtrion’s Linux-ready “SBC-RZN1D” SBC, which will soon power a “Flex2COM” controller, features a Renesas dual-core -A7 RZ/N1D SoC and 4x LAN ports, and is designed for multi-protocol fieldbus communications. Emtrion, which recently announced its emCON-RZ/G1H module based on an octa-core Renesas RZ/G1H SoC, has unveiled a Renesas based, quad-LAN port SBC-RZN1D SBC focused on industrial communication. The SBC-RZN1D taps the Renesas RZ/N1D (R9006G032), one of a new line of RZ/N1D SoCs launched last year by Renesas for industrial multi-protocol communications. Renesas recently collaborated with Avnet to ship its own dual-Ethernet Renesas RZ/N1D Solution Kit (see farther below).
  • Postage-Stamp Linux
    There was a time when big operating systems ran on big iron. IBM, Data General, Burroughs, DEC, and other computer makers built big machines with big, blinking lights, and big price tags. They ran grown-up software and they supported multiuser operating systems. If you wanted a toy, you built a microcomputer. If you wanted a real machine for serious work, you bought a mainframe. Maybe a minicomputer, if it were for lesser tasks.
  • Most Popular Android Versions In February 2018 (Always Updated List)
    Android is the most used operating system on the planet. In fact, it’s almost omnipresent in the mobile ecosystem. Even the Android versions, like Nougat, Marshmallow, Lollipop, etc. have been able to build their individual fan following.

Red Hat and Fedora: David Egts, Radcom, Google Summer of Code 2018, FOSS Wave

  • Red Hat’s David Egts: Microservices Tech Could Help Simplify App Deployment
    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat’s public sector, told MeriTalk in an interview published Wednesday that the microservices technology works to help the developer split complex, large applications into small components and share them with other members of the DevOps team.
  • Radcom partners with Red Hat for NFV management
    Radcom announced it is collaborating with Red Hat to provide operators with a fully virtualized network visibility solution running on Red Hat OpenStack Platform. As operators transition to NFV, a critical first step is gaining end-to-end network visibility. This collaboration enables operators to attain cloud-native network visibility without the hassle of building their own private cloud infrastructure, the vendor said. Once the operator's transition to NFV matures, integration efforts with the NFV and MANO infrastructure can be simplified.
  • The Markets Are Undervaluing these stock’s: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Xerox Corporation (XRX)
  • Meeder Asset Management Inc. Has $1.75 Million Holdings in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Justin W. Flory: Humanitarian open source work: My internship at UNICEF
    In December, I received the happy news of an offer for a internship position at UNICEF in the Office of Innovation. The Office of Innovation drives rapid technological innovation by rapid prototyping of new ideas and building full-stack products to make a positive impact in the lives of children. This is a simple answer, but a more detailed description is on our website. My internship at UNICEF is unique: I support open source community engagement and research as my primary task for the MagicBox project. For years, I’ve done this in open source communities in my free time (namely SpigotMC and Fedora), but never in a professional role. As I navigate my way through this exciting opportunity, I plan to document some of the experience as I go through blogging. My intent is that my observations and notes will be useful to someone else in the humanitarian open source space (or maybe to a future me).
  • Fedora participating in Google Summer of Code 2018
    GSoC is a summer program aiming to bring more student developers into open source software development. It enables students to spend their summer break working with open source organizations on projects proposed by participating organizations and supported by mentors.
  • FOSS Wave with Fedora at KGISL, Coimbatore
    Recently, I was invited by Prem to NASSCOM to give a brief talk on FOSS and Technology as part of the FOSS Wave community. Prem is doing a great job there by putting his effort in helping students from Tier2 and Tier3 cities. Around twenty enthusiastic students were selected and invited to Bengaluru to take part in such events. Mine was one of them. I conducted a GitHub session after Intro to FOSS and a brief intro about Fedora Project.

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
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  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]