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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • RetroShare Release notes for v0.6.2

    This release brings a few good things, including a new differential file lists sytem and end-to-end encryption for file transfer (thanks Mr.Alice for that!), and a greatly improved GUI.

  • Free software archive system Nikita now able to store documents
  • Sponge – A Linux tool which makes you feel you missed it for years

    How often do you come across a situation where you need to parse a file, change some value and write the content back to the file? This mostly occurs when you are dealing with configuration files, which requires some script automated editing. More often than not you will involve a temperory file to do the intermediate changes and then later overwrite the original file. The reason you use temporary file is because if you use pipes and redirections then the output content stream starts flowing before the input stream gets completed. To understand lets look at this example

  • Todo Indicator Fork Adds Context Filtering [Quick Update]

    The original Todo Indicator was last updated back in May, 2014, so WebUpd8 reader William decided to fork it and add a new feature: filtering based on a specific context or project. Furthermore, indicator was updated to work with either Python 2 or Python 3.

  • Shell Scripts Matter

    The shell is an odd beast. Although it goes against every current trend in software engineering (strong typing, compile checks over runtime checks, ...), shell scripts are here to stay, and still constitute an important part of every developer's life.

    The weird thing about shell scripts is that even strong advocates of good practices gladly forget all they know when it comes to shell scripting.

  • Beginners Guide To The Bash Terminal

    BASH also offers the ability to write scripts. A script can be anything from just a few commands to a very complex program. Basically, anything you can type at a command line can be put into a script and run as a program. This is very useful when you find yourself typing in a series of commands to get something done over and over again. Just throw it into script and then it happens with just one command. Now, are you begging to see just how powerful the terminal can be?

  • 6 Alternative Linux Shells for Power Users

    Bash, or the Bourne Again Shell, is what comes pre-installed on most Linux distros. However, it’s not the only shell out there. There are several others to try. Here are six alternative shells that can replace bash. Each of them has its pros and cons, so you have to try them out and see which is the best for you.

  • What's a point to switch from bash to another shell?

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 6 Best PDF Page Cropping Tools For Linux

    Portable Document Format (PDF) is a well known and possibly the most used file format today, specifically for presenting and sharing documents reliably, independent of software, hardware, or more so, operating system.

    It has become the De Facto Standard for electronic documents, especially on the Internet. Because of this reason, and increased electronic information sharing, many people today get useful information in PDF documents.

  • Kgif – A Simple Shell Script to Create a Gif File from Active Window

    Kgif is a simple shell script which create a Gif file from active window. I felt this app especially designed to capture the terminal activity. I personally used, very often for that purpose.

    It captures activity as a series of PNG images, then combines all together to create a animated GIF. The script taking a screenshot of the active window at 0.5s intervals. If you feel, its not matching your requirement, straight away you can modify the script as per your need.

  • Some Firefox 52 Users on Linux Left Without Sound

    Many Firefox users on Linux were left without the ability to play sound in their browser after updating to Firefox 52, released last week.

    The issue at the heart of this problem is that Mozilla dropped support for ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture) and is now requiring Linux users to have installed the PulseAudio library to support audio playback inside Firefox.

    ALSA is a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers. On the other hand, PulseAudio is a more modern sound server that's already supported on most Linux distros, but also on FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and even macOS.

  • Modern software development is cancer

    Somewhere in the past 15 years, it all went wrong.

  • Gna! Software Hosting Will Shut Down

    Do you know Gna! Software Project Hosting? It's something today similar to SourceForge, GitHub, or Savannah, a place that host many free software projects. You find many projects source codes there, along with all development stuffs (SCM, bugtrack, forum, etc.). The important thing is Gna! supports and hosts only free software projects. Yesterday (Thursday, March 17th) I came across a sad reminder that Gna! will shut down soon. Actually this plan was announced in November 2016, it said "6-months notice before saying goodbye", so it could be this April or May 2017. I show my support to Gna! by this article and I humbly encourage you to support them too by any way you can. Big thanks and respect for Gna! for this 13 years supporting free software.

  • The GNU Toolchain Has Made Much Progress So Far In 2017

    GNU tooling updates we have seen recently include GLIBC 2.25, GDB 7.12.1, Newlib 2.5, GCC 6.3, GCC 7 nearing release, and Binutils 2.28.

Wine 2.4 Has Fixes for Aliens vs. Predator, The Next BIG Thing, and Nvidia GPUs

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Software

The Wine 2.4 development release is now available for download continuing the road to the next major update of the free and open source implementation of Windows on Unix.

Read more

Also: Wine 2.4 Released, Still Working Towards Direct3D CSMT

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Gnome Encfs Manager – An Ease way to Create a Encrypted Directory in Linux

    Gnome Encfs Manager (short name is GEncfsM) is a tool to manage EncFS filesystems in Linux whihc is best alternative for Cryptkeeper and has lots of unique features. It’s very useful when you use EncFS with cloud sync / storage services such as Dropbox, etc.,

    GEncfsM is an easy to use manager and mounter for encfs stashes featuring per-stash configuration, Gnome Keyring support (standard authentication mechanism). Tray menu is inspired by Cryptkeeper. You have a option to mount the directory automatically on login.

  • `PB For Desktop`: Cross-Platform Desktop App For Pushbullet (Supports Android Notification Mirroring On Linux Desktops)

    KDE Connect (with KDE Connect Indicator for Unity and other desktops that support AppIndicators) is great for integrating Android devices with your desktop. However, KDE Connect depends on quite a few KDE packages, which some users don't want to install on their GTK-based desktops.

    An alternative to KDE Connect is Pushbullet. While the free version has some limitations and it doesn't offer all the features available with KDE Connect, it does provide options to send files up to 25MB, send messages from your desktop (limited to 100/month in the free version, and a storage cap of 2GB) and most importantly, it can mirror your phone's notifications on the desktop.

  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.1.18 & 5.0.36 with Improvements for Shared Folders

    Oracle announced the availability of two new maintenance updates for the 5.1 and 5.0 stable branches of the open-source and cross-platform Virtualbox virtualization software for all supported platforms.

    VirtualBox 5.1.18 is now the newest and most advanced version of the 5.1 series, bringing improvements for Shared Folders by addressing two regressions discovered in the previous point release. Specifically, it fixes an issue with access to long paths and case-insensitive filename access, but only for Windows guests.

  • PC Building Simulator for Windows and Linux

    PC Building Simulator is a game for Windows and Linux devices in which you simulate the building of desktop computer systems.

  • PC Building Simulator pre-alpha game released (free)

    This week a new Sim game has been released in alpha testing stage and free to donwload for those interested in the topic. The PC Building Simulator v0.01 is available to download now for Windows and Linux users.

  • Chrome Could Start Using Native Notifications on Linux

    Google Chrome could soon use native notifications on Linux desktops. A bug report asking for the browser to use a Linux desktop environment’s notification system was filed late last year but recently become active again. Google Chrome (and Chromium) currently use the Chrome Notification API to show alerts from websites, extensions and Chrome Apps on Windows, macOS and Linux.

  • Firefox Goes PulseAudio Only, Leaves ALSA Users With No Sound

    If you’re a Linux user who upgraded to Firefox 52 only to find that the browser no longer plays sound, you’re not alone.

    Firefox 52 saw release last week and it makes PulseAudio a hard dependency — meaning ALSA only desktops are no longer supported.

    Ubuntu uses PulseAudio by default (as most modern Linux distributions do) so the switch won’t affect most — but some Linux users and distros do prefer, for various reasons, to use ALSA, which is part of the Linux kernel.

  • GNU Guile 2.2.0 released

    We are pleased to announce GNU Guile 2.2.0, the first of a new stable release series. More than 6 years in the making, Guile 2.2 includes a new optimizing compiler and high-performance register virtual machine. Compared to the old 2.0 series, real-world programs often show a speedup of 30% or more with Guile 2.2.

    Besides bringing the compiler and virtual machine, Guile 2.2 removes limitations on you and your programs by lowering memory usage, speeding up the "eval" interpreter, providing better support for multi-core programming, and last but not least, removing any fixed stack size limit. With Guile 2.2, you can recurse to your heart's content!

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • QEMU 2.9 Is Being Prepped With New Functionality

    QEMU 2.9-rc0 was tagged yesterday as this important piece of the open-source Linux virtualization stack prepares for its next major release

  • Flatpak 0.9.1 Introduces New, Ninja-Based Build System, Flatpak-Builder Changes

    Less than a week since the launch of the fourth maintenance update to the Flatpak 0.8 series of the open-source Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework (formerly XGD-App), Alex Larsson announced today Flatpak 0.9.1.

    Flatpak 0.9.1 appears to the be the first point release to the major Flatpak 0.9 series, and we say major because this milestone adds numerous improvements compared to the 0.8 branch, especially to the build system. The biggest change appearing to be a new Ninja-based build system called "cmake-ninja".

  • GCC 7.1 Will Likely Be Released In Mid-April

    Richard Biener has issued a new status report concerning the state of GCC 7 and that it should be released the middle of next month.

    GCC 7 remains in regression and documentation fixing mode with trying to nail down the rest of the P1 (highest priority) regressions. As of yesterday there are 17 P1 regressions remaining. For the other regressions there are 108 P2 regressions, 19 regressions of P3 level, 138 regressions of P4, and 30 of P5.

  • guile 2.2 omg!!!

    Oh, good evening my hackfriends! I am just chuffed to share a thing with yall: tomorrow we release Guile 2.2.0. Yaaaay!

    I know in these days of version number inflation that this seems like a very incremental, point-release kind of a thing, but it's a big deal to me. This is a project I have been working on since soon after the release of Guile 2.0 some 6 years ago. It wasn't always clear that this project would work, but now it's here, going into production.

  • IBus 1.5.15 is released

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • MariaDB 10.1.22 now available

    The MariaDB project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of MariaDB 10.1.22. This is a stable (GA) release. See the Release Notes and Changelogs for details.

  • man-pages-4.10 is released

    I've released man-pages-4.10. The release tarball is available on kernel.org. The browsable online pages can be found on man7.org. The Git repository for man-pages is available on kernel.org.

    This release resulted from patches, bug reports, reviews, and comments from over 40 contributors. This release sees a large number of changes: a record 600 commits changing around 160 pages. The changes include the addition 11 pages, significant rewrites of 3 other pages, and enhancements to many other pages.

  • MATE 1.18 Desktop Released, Finished Porting To GTK3

    MATE 1.18 is now available as the latest version of this GNOME2-forked open-source desktop environment.

    The MATE 1.18 development cycle focused on finishing the conversion from GTK2 to GTK3. With MATE 1.18, GTK3 is the only tool-kit API supported and needs at least GTK+ 3.14.

  • MATE 1.18 released

    After 6 months of development the MATE Desktop team are proud to announce the release of MATE Desktop 1.18. We’d like to thank every MATE contributor for their help making this release possible.

  • New GtkTester project

    There are plenty of efforts to provide automated GUI testing, this is another one working in my case, I would like to share. It is written in Vala, is a GTK+ library with just one top window, you can attach your widget to test, can add test cases, check status and finish by calling asserts. Feel free to ask any thing you need or add issues, in order to improve it.

  • How I became a GNOME contributor

    Recently, I was asked by my fellow GNOME friends to write how did I transitioned from nothing to a GNOME contributor. The intention is to motivate people to engage. I don’t think my story is that exciting, but, well, why not? If someone gets motivated and start contributing, goal achieved. But beware: there ain’t any TL;DR here. it’s just a long story.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • Rambox – A Messaging and Emailing App That Combines 73 Apps Into One

    Rambox is a free messaging and emailing app created using Electron which is composed of various popular web applications to provide users with the ability to add as many web services as are supported in the same place and to use multiple accounts by way of duplicate apps.

  • digiKam 5.5.0 is released

    Following the 5th release 5.4.0 published in January 2017, the digiKam team is proud to announce the new release 5.5.0 of digiKam Software Collection. As 5.4.0, this version introduces again several improvements in database interface.

    This time, Mario Frank has significantly improved the threads management done in background to prevent an overload of the computer under intensive workload by batch processing of items. The maintenance now does not generate massive amounts of threads anymore. Instead, we use a queue based approach to level the load on the CPUs more appropriately. This should improve the re-activeness during maintenance.

  • KDE digiKam 5.5.0 Released

    Open-source photographers can now enjoy digiKam 5.5 as the latest version of this high-quality free software photo manager application.

  • Flatpak 0.8.4 Continues Backporting of Features to Make OpenGL Support Work Well

    Alex Larsson from the Flatpak project, an open-source initiative to offer a universal binary format for all GNU/Linux distributions, announced the availability of Flatpak 0.8.4.

    Coming about three weeks after the release of Flatpak 0.8.4, this update includes fixes for various crashes reported by users since Flatpak 0.8.3 or a previous version, as well as documentation improvements. It also addresses the xauth propagation, which some users reported broken.

  • GNOME Wayland Gets Last Minute Drag-n-Drop Improvements

    GNOME's Mutter is getting ready for next week's planned GNOME 3.24.0 debut by overnight releasing Mutter 3.23.92.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Indicator Bulletin is a Searchable Clipboard Manager for Ubuntu
  • Peek Screen Recorder Hits 1.0, Adds Stacks of New Features

    Open source animated screen recorder app Peek has hit version 1.0 — and added major new features to celebrate. Screen captures can be exported as animated GIFs, but Peek 1.0 adds WebM and MP4 exporting to the mix, making it a fully-fledged rival to other desktop screen recording apps like Green Recorder and Simple Screen Recorder.

  • 'Jarvis' brings AI to the Linux command line, without Iron Man

    Welcome again to Repo Roundup, in which The Reg trawls online code repositories to let you know about the fun, the useful or the inexplicable.

    This week, let's start with DevSkim from Microsoft, which quietly landed in public preview in mid-December.

  • [Quick Tips] Notepadqq, An Alternative to NotePad++ on Ubuntu/Debian/Linux?

    If You have migrated from Windows and you are missing your Notepad++ Text Editor, then here we have the best alternative for you.

  • SpiderOak – A Secure Cloud-Storage That is all About Privacy

    In our day and age, local storage options are gradually becoming a thing of the past and there’s been an ever-growing presence of cloud backup companies offering varying backup services.

    The one huge caveat, however, is the fact that most of these cloud-related backup options are not the greatest in terms of maintaining their promise of privacy.

  • [Older] New and improved Samba file server released

    Do you have a network-attached storage (NAS) device holding your accounts payable, document archives, or just your baby photos? If so, you're running Samba, the open-source file and print server.

  • Pidgin 2.12 Released, Drops Yahoo, Facebook Messaging Support
  • Pidgin 2.12 Instant Messenger Client Released

    The Pidgin instant messenger client has seen its first release in nine months.

    Pidgin 2.12 has done away with a number of protocols that are no longer supported upstream, including Facebook XMPP, MSN, MySpace, Mxit, and Yahoo. Pidgin 2.12 has also restored support for AIM.

  • Weblate users survey

    Weblate is growing quite well in last months, but sometimes its development is really driven by people who complain instead of following some roadmap with higher goals. I think it's time to change it at least a little bit. In order to get broader feedback I've sent out short survey to active project owners in Hosted Weblate week ago.

    I've decided to target at smaller audience for now, though publicly open survey might follow later (but it's always harder to evaluate feedback across different user groups).

  • Email and RSS and their readers and writers

    I’ve been using claws-mail to both read/compose emails and to read all the vast pile of RSS feeds I try and keep up with for quite a while now and it’s for the most part been fine. I never liked claws-mail use of mh folders instead of something more standard like Maildir, and it’s calendar integration is… not there, but it did a pretty good job.

    Unfortunately, claws-mail uses a plugin called ‘fancy’ to render html (which sees heavy use when loading rss feeds). This plugin uses the old old webkit1 (webkitgtk package in Fedora). This package hasn’t been maintained upstream in quite a long while and the number of vulnerabilities in it has just grown and grown. Other distros have dropped it entirely, and Fedora is finally following suit very soon. This has caused the Fedora claws-mail maintainers to drop the fancy plugin to prevent dropping claws-mail entirely. However, without that plugin, RSS reading is… not very pretty.

  • New life in Simon speech recognition

    As my blog as FSFE Fellow No. 1 is temporarily not aggregated on planet.kde.org and my private blog about woodwork (German only) currently only tells about a wooden staircase (but soon again about wooden jewelry) I'm building I found a new place for my KDE (non-Randa) related stuff: KDE Blogs. Thanks to the KDE Sysadmin team for the quick setup!

  • KDE "Simon" Speech Recognition Being Revived

    Mario Fux is looking to drive some new life into Simon speech recognition for KDE. For getting things going, Mario is looking at doing a final release of Simon that uses kdelibs4 and Qt4, following that the development focus will shift to making use of KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt5. There are already commits since 2013 to the KDE4/Qt4 version of Simon, warranting a release.

Leftovers: Software and Development

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Software
  • Feed the Monkey is an Open-Source TinyTinyRSS Desktop Client

    FeedTheMonkey is an open-source desktop feed reader for the open-source Tiny Tiny RSS service.

    The apps uses the official Tiny Tiny RSS API to fetch ‘normalized feeds and to synchronize the “article read” marks’.

  • Scripting an arithmeticker

    OK, you're probably thinking "WHY? There are plenty of perfectly good GUI calculators for Linux. Why build another one?" And my answer is "Because the available calculators are way too powerful and don't do what I want on-screen."

    I manage my screen's real estate pretty carefully. I run Debian Xfce, and the screenshot below shows a typical workspace on my 1920 x 1080 px monitor. Applications (like the GIMP screen pictured) open maximised, but are restricted in size and position because I've set my workspace margins to left 10 px, bottom 10 px, top 60 px and right 400 px. The top margin leaves room for the 50 px panel at top right, and the right margin leaves plenty of room for me to read the keyboard shortcuts I've written on the desktop background image.

  • The KDE project has 54 ideas for Google Summer of Code

    Google’s “Summer of Code” (GSoC) will be happening for the thirtheenth time this year, and the KDE project is yet again one of the 201 participating open source organizations. The project’s list of ideas students may tackle has currently grown to 54 entries.

  • Favored Swift hits the charts: Now in top 10 programming languages

    In March, the Swift programming language rose to became the 10th most popular, at least by the measure of TIOBE Software.

    Open-sourced by Apple in 2015, Swift has been touted as an appealing alternative to better-established programming languages because of its safety, speed, and approachable syntax. It combines modern language features like garbage collection and type safety with readability, not to mention decent documentation.

    Swift is also ranked 10 in the PYPL Index, which derives its data from Google Trends. RedMonk's ranking from 2016 shows Swift a bit further back in the pack.

    [...]

    Swift also happens to top GitHub's list of programming languages being actively developed on the site (which of course omits development activity elsewhere).

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack
    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.
  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF
    Containers have become a critical component of modern cloud, and Docker Inc. controls the heart of containers, the container runtime. There has been a growing demand that this critical piece of technology should be under control of a neutral, third party so that the community can invest in it freely.
  • How Blockchain Is Helping China Go Greener
    Blockchain has near-universal applicability as a distributed transaction platform for securely authenticating exchanges of data, goods, and services. IBM and the Beijing-based Energy-Blockchain Labs are even using it to help reduce carbon emissions in air-polluted China.
  • An efficient approach to continuous documentation
  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project
    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. :) It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.
  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor
    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.
  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune
    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.
  • Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source [Ed: Microsoft Peter is openwashing a patent trap with back doors]
  • Simulate the Internet with Flashback, a New WebDev Test Tool from LinkedIn
  • Mashape Raises $18M for API Gateway Tech
    Casado sees Mashape's Kong API gateway in particular as being a particularly well positioned technology. Kong is an open-source API gateway and microservice management technology.
  • PrismTech to Demonstrate Open Source FACE 2.1 Transport Services Segment (TSS) Reference Implementation at Air Force FACE Technical Interchange Meeting
    PrismTech’s TSS reference implementation is being made available under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v3 open source license terms.
  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.