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Software

Nintendo Sings Browser Duet With Opera

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Software

Opera Software on Wednesday announced plans to bring a Web revolution to the living room. The Norway-based browser developer intends to do this through a partnership with Nintendo.

Linux Antivirus and Firewall Beta from Panda

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Software

Panda Software released a new public beta today for DesktopSecure, their antivirus and firewall program for Linux. It's available as a free download from their Web site. No, there isn't any huge new influx of Linux malware to be addressed: CTO Patrick Hinojosa says it's meant more to help Linux users be good neighbors.

Nine things you should know about Nautilus

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Software

The Nautilus program in GNOME is not only the default file manager, it creates and manages the desktop. While it looks simple on the surface, there is a lot of hidden power under the shell. The latest version of Nautilus is 2.14.0, which is included in Fedora Core 5. That's the one I poked with a stick.

Bettering the Linux desktop -- Portland progress

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Software

Six months ago, architects from two dozen desktop-oriented Linux projects came together in Portland, Ore. to work together on creating the best possible Linux desktop. Thus was born the Portland Project. Now, in Mainz, Germany, the expanded group is meeting again to see how far it's come and to look at what's ahead.

The Rise of Independent Media

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Software

What would happen if anybody could produce radio or TV programming as easily as they consume it? What would happen if the natural limits to broadcasting went away?

Those questions only had sci-fi answers when I was a kid growing up in New Jersey.

Window management and the power of scripting

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Software

In the last edition of Linux.Ars, I wrote a review of GNOME 2.14 in which I criticized the Metacity window manager and expressed dissatisfaction with its lack of functionality. In response to my arguments, I received e-mail from several readers with comments about window management.

Mambo lead developer quits due to conscience

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Software

Mambo lead developer Martin Brampton today announced he was severing all ties with the Open Source project. His departure — which is eerily similar to the departure of an entire development team last year — comes in the wake of him finding himself unable to continue due to matters of conscience, a statement said today.

OpenOffice makes the most of Microsoft privacy clampdown

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Software

The OpenOffice.org productivity project is looking to take advantage of Microsoft Corp's latest piracy crackdown to promote its open source Office alternative, pointing out that it could be the quickest and cheapest way to get legal.

Next NVIDIA Linux Driver

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Software

With NVIDIA's 1.0-8756 Linux display driver having come out exactly one month ago, it should be about time for another driver release. For a while now, NVIDIA has been on the approximate 4 month/3~4 week release cycle for their Linux display drivers. This time around it seems that NVIDIA's Linux display driver launch may be pushed back a bit.

More Xgl Stuff: Desktop Hexagon

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Software

Beta 11 features a couple cool things in Xgl. First, the cube plugin is no longer constrained to four faces. Full Blurb Here.

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More in Tux Machines

'We expect this is the bottom' in enterprise growth: Red Hat CEO

OSS Leftovers

  • AxonIQ Launches New Open Source Server
    AxonIQ, the company behind the open source Axon Framework, launches Axon 4.0 the open, integrated development and operations tool for Microservices and Event Sourcing on the JVM.
  • L10N Report: September Edition
  • Tidelift surpasses $1M to pay open source software maintainers
    Tidelift announced that it has surpassed one million dollars committed via its platform to pay open source software maintainers to provide professional assurances for their projects, as momentum behind this new approach to professional open source continues to build. Over 100 packages are already on the Tidelift platform, with maintainers getting paid to provide support for their packages through the Tidelift Subscription. Top packages featured include Vue, Material-UI, Babel, Gulp, Fabric, Active Admin, Doctrine, and StandardJS. With Tidelift, software development teams receive assurances around maintenance, security, and licensing from a single source. By bringing together maintainers with a global market of customers, Tidelift is helping make open source work better for everyone.
  • Artifex and First National Title Insurance Company Reach Settlement Over MuPDF Open Source Dispute
    Artifex Software, Inc. and First National Title Insurance Company announced today a confidential agreement to settle their legal dispute. Case No. 4: 18-cv-00503-SBA, filed by Artifex in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, concerned the use of Artifex's open source software MuPDF under the GNU Affero General Public License and the GNU General Public License. While the parties had their differences in the interpretation of the open source licenses, the companies were able to reach an amicable resolution based on their mutual respect for and recognition of copyright protection and the open source philosophy. Terms of the settlement remain confidential.

EEE, Entryism and Openwashing

  • New Linux distro specifically designed for Windows comes to the Microsoft Store [Ed: WLinux or Whitewater Foundry not the first time people exploit Microsoft to put a price tag on FOSS such as LibreOffice. Microsoft is doing a fine job sabotaging the GNU/Linux 'ecosystem'.]
    WLinux is based on Debian, and the developer, Whitewater Foundry, claims their custom distro will also allow faster patching of security and compatibility issues that appear from time to time between upstream distros and WSL. [...] In return for saving developers time Whitewater Foundry is charging $19.99 (though the app is currently 50% off and the distribution can be downloaded from Github for free).
  • Open source dev gets Win32 apps running on Xbox One [Ed: Running blobs on two DRM platforms does not make you "Open source dev"]
  • Building Blocks of Secure Development: How to Make Open Source Work for You [Ed: Veracode self-promotion in "webinar" form, badmouthing FOSS to push their proprietary things. They work with Microsoft.]
  • SD Times open source project of the week: TonY [Ed: Openwashing of a surveillance operation at Microsoft]
    Unsatisfied with the available solutions for connecting the analytics-generating power of their TensorFlow machine learning implementations with the scalable data computation and storage capabilities of their Apache Hadoop clusters, developers at LinkedIn decided that they’d take matters into their own hands with the development of this week’s highlighted project, TonY.
  • Open Source: Automating Release Notes in Github [Ed: The New York Times is still propping up Microsoft hosting]
  • Opendesk launches augmented-reality shopping for its open-source furniture [Ed: Calling furniture "open"]
    Opendesk customers can now use augmented reality to see how the furniture brand's pieces look in their homes before ordering them from local makers. The augmented-reality (AR) experience launched with the arrival of Apple's iOS 12 operating system this week. It enables customers to use their smartphones to view some of Opendesk's furniture superimposed on the room in front of them.
  • Open Source Testing Startup Cypress Leaves Beta With Thousands of Users, Launches Paid Plans [Ed: This is not Open Source; they misuse the label and even put dashes ("open-source") because they know they're faking it.]
    Cypress.io‘s CEO Drew Lanham explains that the startup’s tool is software created by developers, for developers. The company was founded in 2014 by technologist Brian Mann, after observing that while computing and application development had changed drastically over the past decade, software testing had not. Large companies now release thousands of software updates a year, often on a daily basis across their organization. Technology teams aim to move rapidly, iterating on an agile basis and working in parallel so they can sync their code together even faster. But, as Lanham explains, the testing software out there was far outdated for these agile processes.
  • Kindred Introduces SenseAct, the First Reinforcement Learning Open-Source Toolkit for Physical Robots [Ed: Kindred or SenseAct not actually FOSS; but they sure try to make it seem that way, by focusing on a toolkit.]

Top Linux Distros for Software Developers

A major factor in the choice of Linux distro is your personal preference. You may try one of the most popular Linux distros but find that you prefer one that’s less often used. Your experience with Linux will also factor into which distro is suited to you. With the benefits Linux can offer — including flexibility, stability, and support — it’s worth evaluating your options. Read more