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Software

Software: Wire, Shutter, Dimmer

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Software
  • Do You Use 'Wire' On Your Mobile? If Yes, Here Is Linux Client For You From Secure Repo

    Wire is a communication application mainly focused on privacy. Wire is available for almost every platform Linux, Windows, Mac and mobile devices, its applications across all platforms uniformly use state-of-the-art encryption mechanisms that are recognized as reliable by experts and the community.
    Wire offers end-to-end encrypted text messaging, video, voice calls and media, all conversation are private and secured, all conversations are available on multiple devices and platforms without weakening security.

  • Screenshot Tool ‘Shutter’ Gets First Update in Over 2 Years

    It’s been well over two and a half years since feature-rich screenshot tool Shutter was last updated — but a new release is finally here! Shutter’s last release was back in 2014, so this update has been a little overdue. But don’t get too excited; the wait doesn’t mean the app picks up any new features.

  • Desktop Dimmer Application Can Help Your Eyes To Stay Safe

    Well, you can adjust your screen brightness for your eyes but at some point. Dimmer lets you make your dark screen to darker. It is a free utility for setting the brightness of your main screen as well as external monitors. You can choose which screens will be set to the selected brightness level. Perfect for dark room, planetariums or anyone working in the dark with multiple monitors. For video presentations use dimmer to dim your laptop screen, while leaving the VGA output at full brightness on the projector. From the system tray you access Dimmer slider, the range from 0% (Means full brightness) to all the way to 100%.

Software: Enpass, Sublime Text, Renames, Clementine and GPMDP

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Software
  • Enpass Is The Free Cross-Platform Password Manager

    Previously we covered KeePassXC password manager which is also free application. Here comes another password manager called Enpass, it is free and cross-platform available for Linux, Windows, Mac, Android, Blackberry, Windows Phone and iOS.

  • Sublime Text: You May Love This Text/Code Editor

    If you are a developer then you must have your favorite text editor on your system, but it is always a good idea to give a try to new application. Sublime Text Editor is proprietary application and been around since 2008, it is written using C++ and Python programming language, it cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac.

  • These Rename Utilities Can Help You Rename Batch Files In Linux

    In Linux there are multiple ways to rename files and folders in batch but from command-line it can be difficult for some users. Lets checkout some useful rename utilities that are available for Linux.

  • Oh my darling, oh my darling Clementine

    Is there a perfect media player? Of course not. All right, then how about a reasonable one, combining a pleasant and intuitive interface plus a wide rage of great features? That sounds like a nice, ambitious idea, but I have yet to find the software that ticks all the relevant boxes.

    For the past decade and a half, I've mostly resorted to using whatever default program operating systems throw at me, slowly gravitating toward VideoLAN (VLC) as my app of choice, mostly because of its super-powerful codec backend. But then I've also played with many other software, with a sweet spot for Amarok. Now, I think I may have found my unicorn, and Clementine be its name. Onwards!

  • Do You Use Google Play Service? If Yes, Then Try Google Play Music Desktop Player (GPMDP)

    We don't know why Google do not develop applications for their services for Linux/Unix, there are Google Chrome and Google Earth applications available for Linux but not for all of Google services, many of us want Google Drive. Well, for Google Play service there is an 3rd party application available for all desktop platforms.

Software: Chat/IM Solution, Magit, GnuCash and LuaTeX

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Software
  • The Quest for a Common Chat/IM Solution

    A Free/ Open Source Software community usually uses several means of communication: Among them are email, forums, code review and bug tracking systems, nowadays also video chat systems, but one of the central communication channels is usually real-time text communication, also known as instant messaging or chat.

    Traditionally, IRC has been the cornerstone of chat in the FOSS world, as it is open, easy for everyone to join (no account needed) and not in control of any single organization. IRC still does what it was designed for perfectly well, but while it is still basically the same as it was 20 years ago, the world of chat and instant messaging around it has evolved significantly in the meantime: Instant messaging services such as WhatsApp or Telegram (or KakaoTalk, WeChat or Line in Asia) are used by pretty much everyone (and their parents, literally) and systems such as Slack are dominating company communication, and those systems have shaped how people expect a chat system to look and behave.

  • Magit for non-Emacs users

    Unfortunately most potential users are not aware of Magit. Others might be aware of its existence, but would not consider giving it a try because it is implemented as an extension to the Emacs text editor, and that’s not what they are using.

    That’s something I intend to change over the next year, beginning with this article, because I think that Magit can be an excellent Git interface even for users of other editors and IDEs. I am under the impression that many Git users want, or would at least appreciate, something like Magit. It seems worthwhile to invest some time to help some of those potential users get over the initial hurdles. And yes, I do hope that some of those people will support the fundraising campaign.

  • Business accounting with GnuCash

    The first stop in the search for a free accounting system that can replace QuickBooks is a familiar waypoint: the GnuCash application. GnuCash has been around for many years and is known primarily as a personal-finance tool, but it has acquired some business features as well. The question is: are those business features solid enough to allow the program to serve as a replacement for QuickBooks?

    The first order of business is importing existing data into the system. That is not a straightforward task, but it can be done; see this article for the gory details. The result was a 1.8MB XML file containing the company's accounting data since the beginning of 2016. Starting GnuCash with that file takes about 20 seconds on a reasonably modern laptop. It's amazing how long 20 seconds can seem sometimes.

  • LuaTeX comes of age

    TeX has been the tool of choice for the preparation of papers and documents for mathematicians, physicists, and other authors of technical material for many years. Although it takes some effort to learn how to use this venerable work of free software, its devotees become addicted to its ability to produce publication-quality manuscripts from a plain-text, version-control-friendly format.

    Most TeX users use LaTeX, which is a set of commands and macros built on top of TeX that allow automated cross-referencing, indexing, creation of a table of contents, and automatic formatting of many types of documents. TeX, LaTeX, a host of associated utilities, fonts, and related programs are assembled into a large package called TeX Live. It's available through the package managers of many Linux distributions, but to get an up-to-date version, one often needs to download it from its maintainers directly.

Wine 2.16

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 2.16 is now available.

  • Wine 2.16 Released

    Wine 2.16 is now available as the latest bi-weekly development release for running Windows games and applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    Wine 2.16 introduces support for pasting metafiles in RichEdit, better support for grayscale PNGs, support for safety features in library loading, better handling of GdiPlus transforms, DirectWrite rendering improvements, and 19 known bug fixes.

  • Wine 2.16 released with various improvements

Software and Games: Fotoxx, ClipGrab, Axis Football 2017, Nidhogg 2

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Software
Gaming
  • Fotoxx – A Photo Editor and Collection Manager for Linux

    Fotoxx is an open source image editing and collection manager robust and powerful enough for professional use.

    With a focus on editing images taken with a digital camera, it is excellent at managing large photo collections while packing alongside a thumbnail browser, image search using any meta data and (partial) file names, support for batch operations, RAW file import, and a comprehensive set of edit functions including crop, red-eye removal, among other operations.

  • ClipGrab – Download Video from YouTube, Facebook and Other Sites

    ClipGrab is an open source download application with which you can search for and download videos from several famous websites like YouTube, Facebook, Vimeo, Dailymotion, etc. It also has an inbuilt video converter to handle formats like MPEG, WMV, and MP3, among others. It features a fairly simple User Interface with a panel to display results of link searches alongside related videos.

    You can grab videos either by searching for them within the application or by pasting the video URL into the URL field. You can also download videos in their original format or convert them to other supported formats using the file format drop-down menu (depending on whether the website you’re downloading from allows the option or not).

  • Some thoughts on Axis Football 2017

    Touting much gridiron action, Axis Football 2017 [Official Site] is the latest installment in the American Football franchise. I took the game for a spin and have a few thoughts to share.

  • The developer behind Nidhogg 2 has detailed some reasons why it may not come to Linux

    Nidhogg 2 [Steam, Official Site], the sequel to the indie hit of 2014 may not come to Linux and the developer has listed reasons why. Hopefully people can help get this going.

Software: LibreOffice 5.4.1, Upterm, QEMU 2.10, Cloud Explorer 11, Neofetch, YouTube-DLG

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Software
  • LibreOffice 5.4.1 Released with Over 100 Bug Fixes

    This is the first minor update since the LibreOffice 5.4 release earlier this month and offers a number of bug fixes and stability improvements.

  • Upterm is Part Terminal Emulator, Part IDE

    Upterm is billed as a ‘terminal emulator for the 21st century’ — a fairly bold claim.

    “An IDE in the world of terminals,” claims the Github project page; “Strictly speaking, it’s both a terminal emulator and an interactive shell based on Electron.”

    I spent some time playing with the app see if it offered anything new. And I’m happy to say it does.

  • QEMU 2.10 Released With Xen 9pfs Support, QCOW2 LUKS Encryption

    QEMU 2.10 is now available as the latest release for this important piece of the open-source Linux virtualization stack.

    QEMU 2.10 adds support for the Xen 9pfs back-end, a few new sub-commands, support for building QEMU without the TCG tiny code generator, support for the VXHS network protocol, QCOW2 now supports LUKS as an encryption format, various architecture-specific improvements, and more. Some of the arch-specific work includes support for enhanced virtual addressing (EVA) on MIPS, shadow registers and migration on OpenRISC, multi-threaded TCG is enabled for PowerPC, support for POWER9 guests with KVM, many s390 TCG code generation improvements, and some x86 enhancements. Those wanting to learn more about Xen 9pfs can do so here.

  • Cloud Explorer 11 is out!

    Cloud Explorer is a powerful Amazon S3 client with unique features. In case you missed it, I was able to talk about it briefly on Coder Radio. One thing that I forgot to mention is that a new release is coming! I am pleased to announce version 11 of Cloud Explorer! This release contains a lot of bug fixes and enhancements. I am always looking for feedback. If you have suggestions, please file an issue on the GitHub page.

  • Neofetch – Shows Linux System Information With ASCII Distribution Logo

    Neofetch is a cross-platform and easy-to-use command line (CLI) script that collects your Linux system information and display it on the terminal next to an image, either your distributions logo or any ascii art of your choice.

    Neofetch is a fast, highly customizable system info script through command line flags or the user config file. There are over 50 config options to play around with. Also it’s allow you to add your own custom info.

  • YouTube-DLG – A GUI App for YouTube-DL Video Downloader

    I am damn sure that a good number of you must be familiar with youtube-dl by now. It’s an open- source cross-platform CLI app for downloading videos from YouTube and a host of many other sites. It is written in Python and released to the public domain for interested parties to use and modify it however they like.

    Famous as it is, one cannot deny that it will be more convenient to have a GUI for it and that’s where YouTube-DL GUI comes in handy.

Software: Bookworm, Allo, Selene Media Converter, and Falkon

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Software
  • Bookworm: A Simple yet Magnificent eBook Reader for Linux

    Bookworm is an open source eBook reader with an easy and simple layout supporting different file formats like epub, pdf, mobi, cbr and cbz. Supporting cbr and cbz files mean that you can also use it for reading comics on Linux.

  • Unofficial Open-Source Allo Desktop Client Bypasses Chrome

    There is a brand new open-source native desktop client for Google’s Allo that solves at least one of the problems users might have with the web application. Namely, it bypasses the Allo for Web app’s reliance on Google’s Chrome browser which has been a problem for some users since the official web client was first released. Allo for Desktop may solve that problem, though it’s not affiliated with Google in any way, meaning there is some risk associated with installing it. Nonetheless, the source code itself has also been made available on GitHub, making the solution relatively transparent.

  • Looking For Media Converter Then Give A Try To Selene Media Converter

    There are various multimedia converters available for Linux, there is no harm to try new application, well this application is not new and been around from quite sometime. Selene media converter lets you convert audio and video files, this software is an ultimate multimedia converting tool, that can solve virtually all your video/audio converting needs. It supports almost every file format that you are likely to come across and can encode them to popular output formats like WAV/MP3/AAC/FLAC/OPUS/MP4/MKV/OGG/OGV/WEBM etc. It aims to provide a simple GUI for converting files to popular formats along with powerful command-line options for automated/unattended encoding.

  • That was quick: Falkon web browser is now available as a Snap app

    The newly-named Falkon web browser is now available for testing on Ubuntu and KDE Neon.

    KDE Neon is adopting Snap packages as its containerised packaging format of choice (sorry Flatpak fans) and with Falkon now under the auspices of KDE its arrival as a Snap app was always a matter of when and not if.

Software: Turtl, Laverna, Tusk, Corebird, FFmpeg, and Handy Backup

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Software
  • Turtl Is An Great Open-Source and Secure Advanced Note Taking Application

    You may have your favorite note taking application on your system but it is good idea to try new applications, you may like it. Turtl is free, open-source and an advanced note taking application which lets you take notes, store sensitive files, bookmark websites, and save passwords securely. It is released under GNU GPL v3 and source code is available on the GitHub, meaning anybody can download and run their own version personally or in their company's intranet. You can use it from sharing passwords to tracking research on an article you are writing, Turtl keeps it all safe from everyone but you and those you share with.

  • Laverna privacy focused note taking app with sync

    The application is open source, and versions of Mac, Windows and Linux are provided currently. These versions use Electron as their base which means that they are quite heavy when it comes to memory usage for instance.

  • Tusk Adds Much Needed Features to Evernote Web App

    Tusk is a new unofficial and open-source Evernote app for Linux, Mac and Windows.

    Built using Electron, Tusk wraps the regular Evernote web app in a traditional desktop window and adds some useful new features to it, like app menus, keyboard shortcuts and optional dark themes.

  • Corebird 1.6 Released with Minor Tweaks

    A modest update to Linux twitter app Corebird is now available. It includes some minor interface tweaks and improves image uploading.

  • FFmpeg Has Seen Some AVX2 Optimizations For VP9 Decoding

    Another GSoC 2017 project worth highlighting now that Google's annual Summer of Code has finished is the AVX2 optimizations being done to the VP9 decoder within FFmpeg.

    Student developer Ilia Valiakhmetov set out to speed-up the VP9 decoder in FFmpeg this summer by writing some hand-tuned Assembly instructions around AVX2. Advanced Vector Extensions 2 instrunctions have been supported since Intel Haswell CPUs and on the AMD side are present with the Excavator and Zen cores.

  • Handy Backup for Linux: Multi-User Operations and Proof-testing with Ubuntu 16.04

    To satisfy this need, Novosoft LLC continues developing a new Handy Backup branch for Linux, creating and testing a newest solution to backup Ubuntu 16.04 server or workstation data. This Linux backup program has a complete compatibility with a Windows backup tool, Handy Backup 7.9.3, and supports some specific Linux backup features, including multi-user operations.

New Free Software for GNU/Linux: Audacious 3.9, Calamares 3.1.3, Weblate

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GNU
Linux
Software

Krita 3.2.1, Updates Vision and More

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KDE
Software
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Openwashing and Microsoft FUD

BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS