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Software

Software: Nightingale, Crello, Lightworks

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Software

Software: YakYak, SentinelOne, GStreamer, Chrome, SQLite

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Software
  • YakYak is an Open Source Google Hangouts Desktop App

    Meet YakYak, a Google Hangouts desktop app for Linux, Windows and Mac. It supports most Hangout features and has a couple bonus features of its own.

  • SentinelOne Now Supports the Broadest Set of Linux Distributions on the Market
  • Multi-threaded raw video conversion and scaling in GStreamer

    As a small helper object for this kind of processing model, I wrote GstParallelizedTaskRunner which might also be useful for other pieces of code that want to do the same.

    In the end it was not much work, but the results were satisfying. For example the conversion of 1080p to 4k video in the v210 color format with 4 threads gave a speedup of 3.2x. At that point it looks like the main bottleneck was memory bandwidth, but I didn’t look closer as this is already more than enough for the use cases I was interested in.

  • Chrome 62 for Android Brings Accelerated Downloads, Viewing/Copying of Passwords

    A few moments ago, Google promoted its latest Chrome 62 release to Android devices, giving users a heads up of what to expect the next time they update their favorite web browser.

    Google Chrome 62 was promoted last week to the stable channel for Mac, GNU/Linux, and Windows devices, a rather smaller update that introduces a more aggressive "Not secure" warning for websites that are still using the HTTP protocol instead of the more secure HTTPS one, along with support for OpenType Variable Fonts.

  • SQLite Release 3.21.0 On 2017-10-24
  • SQLite 3.21 Picks Up F2FS Atomic Write Support

    SQLite 3.21 is now out as the newest feature release for this widely-used embedded database library.

    The first feature up for SQLite 3.21 when running atop the Flash-Friendly File-System and with SQLite built with batch atomic write enabled, it now supports the atomic-write capabilities of F2FS. This mode should yield "greatly reduced" transaction overhead. F2FS is the first file-system supporting batch atomic write behavior for SQLite and then doesn't write to the rollback journal for making transactions up to twice as fast while reducing SSD wear and tear.

Kodi 17.5 Media Center Released with Support for FFmpeg 3.1.11, Retina Devices

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Movies

Two months after the 17.4 point release, the Kodi team announced today the release and immediate availability for download of the Kodi 17.5 maintenance update with a handful of bug fixes.

While not a major update, Kodi 17.5 adds support for the FFMpeg 3.1.11 open-source multimedia backend, as well as Retina support for Apple's devices, improves power message handling for CEC, enables playback of DVD files over network on GNU/Linux systems, and fixes the up/download buttons of IR remotes for Apple's macOS High Sierra 10.13.

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Software and howtos

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Software
HowTos

Wine Staging 2.19

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Software

3 Tools to Help You Remember Linux Commands

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Software

The Linux desktop has come a very long way from its humble beginnings. Back in my early days of using Linux, knowledge of the command line was essential—even for the desktop. That’s no longer true. Many users might never touch the command line. For Linux system administrators, however, that’s not the case. In fact, for any Linux admin (be it server or desktop), the command line is a requirement. From managing networks, to security, to application and server settings—there’s nothing like the power of the good ol’ command line.

But, the thing is… there are a lot of commands to be found on a Linux system. Consider /usr/bin alone and you’ll find quite a lot of commands (you can issue ls /usr/bin/ | wc -l to find out exactly how many you have). Of course, these aren’t all user-facing executables, but it gives you a good idea of the scope of Linux commands. On my Elementary OS system, there are 2029 executables within /usr/bin. Even though I will use only a fraction of those commands, how am I supposed to remember even that amount?

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Software: Narabu, ucaresystem, Telegram Messenger

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  • Introducing Narabu, part 2: Meet the GPU

    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec. You may or may not want to read part 1 first.

    The GPU, despite being extremely more flexible than it was fifteen years ago, is still a very different beast from your CPU, and not all problems map well to it performance-wise. Thus, before designing a codec, it's useful to know what our platform looks like.

  • ucaresystem Core v4.0 : Added option to upgrade Ubuntu to the next release

    Since Ubuntu 17.10 has just been released, I have added new feature to the ucaresystem Core that can be used by the user to upgrade his distribution to the next stable version or optionally to the next development version of Ubuntu.

    For those who are not familiar with the ucaresystem app it is an automation script that automatically and without asking for your intervention performs some crucial Ubuntu maintenance processes, which otherwise would be done one by one and pressing Y / N each time.

  • 10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger

    Whatsapp may be the best player in the game when it comes to instant messaging apps, but Telegram Messenger is the entire game itself.

    Because Telegram is not just an app, it is an entire communication platform. It is not bound by restrictions or limitations like other apps.

Software: Narabu, Network Monitors, Mailutils, Rubik’s Cube, VirtualBox

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Software
  • Introducing Narabu, part 1: Introduction

    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec, from the Japanese verb narabu, which means to line up or be parallel.

    Let me first state straight up that Narabu isn't where I hoped it would be at this stage; the encoder isn't fast enough, and I have to turn my attention to other projects for a while. Nevertheless, I think it is interesting as a research project in its own right, and I don't think it should stop me from trying to write up a small series. Smile

  • 3 Simple, Excellent Linux Network Monitors
  • Mailutils Version 3.3 available

    Mailutils version 3.3 is available for download. See the NEWS file, for information about changes in this version.

  • Now You Can Play Rubik’s Cube Puzzle In Terminal

    Rubik’s Cube game needs no introduction, right? It is a 3-D combination puzzle game invented by Ernő Rubik, a Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture, in 1974. It is one of the best puzzle game invented so far to enhance the problem-solving skills of the kids and adults. If you’re one Rubik’s Cube lover, you don’t need to buy it online or from a shop. You can play it right from the Terminal. A fellow Developer has created an utility called “NRubik”. It is an N-Curses based, virtual Rubik’s Cube written in Python. If you’re a hardcore CLI user who lives on Terminal all day, NRubik will certainly make your time useful.

  • VirtualBox 5.2 Debuts Officially with Support for Exporting VMs to Oracle Cloud

    To everyone's surprise, Oracle announced today the final release of the VirtualBox 5.2 open-source and cross-platform virtualization software for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, Windows, and Solaris.

    VirtualBox 5.2 is a massive update bringing a revamped and more modern graphical user interface (GUI) based on recent Qt5 technologies, as well as powerful new features that will help you with all of your virtualization tasks. One of these new features is the ability to finally export and store virtual machines into the cloud.

    Oracle has made it possible to export VMs to its Oracle Cloud (OPC) public cloud service, allowing users to easily deploy virtual machines across multiple VirtualBox installations. Imagine you no longer have to export a VM to an external drive to import it on another computer, just download it from the Oracle Cloud.

Software: VirtualBox, Franz, ClipGrab, Gammu, AppArmor, Xfce4, GTK+

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  • Oracle Releases VM VirtualBox 5.2

    It was more than one year ago that VirtualBox 5.1 was released while today it's finally been succeeded by a new feature release.

  • Franz Combines all Your Messaging Apps in a Single Application

    Franz is a free to use application that combines different messaging services like WhatsApp, WeChat, Facebook Messenger, Gmail, Telegram, Skype, Slack and other chat applications in one application.

  • ClipGrab: Video Downloader and Converter Updated for Ubuntu/Linux Mint (PPA)

    ClipGrab is a free software to download and convert videos from different famous sites of Internet. You can easily save your favorite videos from sites like Dailymotion or Vimeo. And you can convert these videos into "usable" formats like WMV, MPEG or MP3. You can check here which sites are supported by this software.

  • Gammu 1.38.5

    Today, Gammu 1.38.5 has been released. After long period of bugfix only releases, this comes with several new noteworthy features.

  • Watch Out Upgrading To Linux 4.14 If You Use AppArmor

    Just a quick public service announcement if you rely upon AppArmor for security on your Linux distribution like Ubuntu/Debian and plan to soon upgrade to the Linux 4.14 kernel...

  • New hotness: xfce4-notifyd 0.4.0

    After quite some development time I have decided to push out xfce4-notifyd 0.4.0 today. This is not just a bugfix, but a feature-packed release.

  • Xfce Gets Notification Improvements With xfce4-notifyd 0.4

    For users of the Xfce4 desktop environment, a new release of xfce4-notifyd 0.4 is now available as the project's newest feature release.

  • GTK+ 3.92 Released With Many Improvements & New Features

    Matthias Clasen has today released GTK+ 3.92 as the latest test release in the long road towards the major GTK4 tool-kit update.

    GTK+ 3.92 features Vulkan improvements, more widget reworking, continued Emoji support, and more. Highlights of changes found in this GTK+ 3.92 update include:

  • SteelCloud Expands Linux STIG Support to Ubuntu, SUSE, and Oracle Linux

    SteelCloud LLC announced today that it has enhanced ConfigOS, its patented STIG remediation software, to support the newly released Ubuntu, SUSE, and Oracle Linux STIGs. These new supported platforms bolster the product's existing Red Hat Linux automated STIG remediation capabilities. The expanded ConfigOS Linux security content will be provided to new and existing customers at no additional charge.

So the 'Year of Linux' never happened. When is it Chrome OS's turn?

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The year of Linux desktop was a running joke. The concept of Linux being ready for the mainstream with users confidently running it on their desktops, sadly, never happened.

Some bravely pushed the idea: the latest being Canonical with a more macOS-like desktop, easier to configure and use than the standard Linux distro. It came with an app-store concept too.

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Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."

Review: Fedora 27 Workstation

On the whole there are several things to like about Fedora 27. The operating system was stable during my trial and I like that there are several session options, depending on whether we want to use Wayland or the X display server or even a more traditional-looking version of GNOME. I am happy to see Wayland is coming along to the point where it is close to on par with the X session. There are some corner cases to address, but GNOME on Wayland has improved a lot in the past year. I like the new LibreOffice feature which lets us sign and verify documents and I like GNOME's new settings panel. These are all small, but notable steps forward for GNOME, LibreOffice and Fedora. Most of the complaints I had this week had more to do with GNOME specifically than Fedora as an operating system. GNOME on Fedora is sluggish on my systems, both on the desktop computer and in VirtualBox, especially the Wayland session. This surprised me as when I ran GNOME's Wayland session on Ubuntu last month, the desktop performed quite a bit better. Ubuntu's GNOME on Wayland session was smooth and responsive, but Fedora's was too slow for me to use comfortably and I switched over to using the X session for most of my trial. Two other big differences I felt keenly between Ubuntu and Fedora were with regards to how these two leading projects set up GNOME. On Ubuntu we have a dock that acts as a task switcher, making it a suitable environment for multitasking. Fedora's GNOME has no equivalent. This means Fedora's GNOME is okay for running one or two programs at a time, but I tend to run eight or nine applications at any given moment. This becomes very awkward when using Fedora's default GNOME configuration as it is hard to switch between open windows quickly, at least without installing an extension. In a similar vein, Ubuntu's GNOME has window control buttons and Fedora's version does not, which again adds a few steps to what are usually very simple, quick actions. What it comes down to is I feel like Ubuntu takes GNOME and turns it into a full featured desktop environment, while Fedora provides us with just plain GNOME which feels more like a framework for a desktop we can then shape with extensions rather than a complete desktop environment. In fact, I think that describes Fedora's approach in general - the distribution feels more like a collection of open source utilities rather than an integrated whole. Earlier I mentioned LibreOffice can work with signed documents, but Fedora has no key manager, meaning we need to find and download one. Fedora ships with Totem, which is a fine video player, but it doesn't work with Wayland, making it an odd default choice. These little gaps or missed connections show up occasionally and it sets the distribution apart from other projects like openSUSE or Linux Mint where there is a stronger sense the pieces of the operating system working together with a unified vision. The big puzzle for me this week was with software updates. Linux effectively solved updating software and being able to keep running without a pause, reboot or lock-up decades ago. Other mainstream distributions have fast updates - some even have atomic, on-line updates. openSUSE has software snapshots through the file system, Ubuntu has live kernel updates that do away with rebooting entirely and NixOS has atomic, versioned updates via the package manager, to name just three examples. But Fedora has taken a big step backward in making updates require an immediate reboot, and taking an unusually long time to complete the update process, neither of which benefits the user. Fedora has some interesting features and I like that it showcases new technologies. It's a good place to see what new items are going to be landing in other projects next year. However, Fedora feels more and more like a testing ground for developers and less like a polished experience for people to use as their day-to-day operating system. Read more

6 Reasons Why Linux is Better than Windows For Servers

A server is a computer software or a machine that offers services to other programs or devices, referred to as “clients“. There are different types of servers: web servers, database servers, application servers, cloud computing servers, file servers, mail servers, DNS servers and much more. The usage share for Unix-like operating systems has over the years greatly improved, predominantly on servers, with Linux distributions at the forefront. Today a bigger percentage of servers on the Internet and data centers around the world are running a Linux-based operating system. Read more Also: All the supercomputers in the world moved to Linux operating systems

Android Leftovers