Software

Software news or reviews with focus on GNU/Linux and Free/Open Source software

OpenELEC 4.2 Beta 1 Is Now Based on XBMC “Gotham” 13.2 Beta 1 and Linux Kernel 3.15

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

The OpenELEC developers have managed to quickly release a new version of their Linux distribution based on the XBMC Gotham 13.2 Beta 1, which is only a week old. This multimedia hub is used on its own, but it can also be implemented in an operating system.

The distribution is based on the latest XBMC version, which means that its developers are constantly implementing all the bleeding edge features and changes from that software.

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Firefox OS lands in Germany – with France, Asia, and more to come

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Linux
Moz/FF

Mozilla's Firefox OS continues its slow march across the globe, with carriers set to begin shipping devices running the open source, browser-based smartphone platform in additional developed markets this week.

Spanish telecoms giant Telefónica has previously sold Firefox OS phones in Spain, but the bulk of its efforts have been focused on its subsidiaries in Spanish-speaking emerging markets, including Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

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Snowden on Dropbox: It’s hostile to privacy

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Software
Security

Dropbox is a very popular Cloud storage services, but is it good for the privacy-conscious?

According to Edward Snowden, it’s not.

In an interviewed published on GuardianNews, Snowden described Dropbox as “hostile to privacy.”

So what are the better alternatives. Snowden recommended Cloud storage services with zero-knowledge as a key feature.

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Best Fitness Apps for Google Chrome and Chrome OS

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Google
Software

Having to keep track of your daily eating habits is quite a task. Oh, and there is those tedious workouts that you have to do. Being healthy is such a bore, isn't it? Don't worry, even the healthiest of people hate getting out of bed and going to the gym. Yep, that's true. Fitness isn't a pleasant experience, it's hard work and yes, hard work for some people is boring.

As prolonged tech junkies, we are used to having shortcuts or little apps here and there that help us cut our job in half, in other words, keep us lazy. We have apps for self-diagnosing, for reserving our table at a restaurant, and even ordering the menu. Just press a button and your job is done.

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Google Chrome 36 Brings Web Components to the Browser

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Google
Software

Google is out with a new version of its Chrome web browser, providing users with new features and security fixes for over two dozen vulnerabilities.

Among the user facing improvements in Chrome 36 is a new look for the Incognito mode. Chrome has had an incongito mode since Google first debuted the browser back in 2008. Incognito mode, which is sometime referred to as 'Porn Mode', enables a user to view websites without having those websites or cookies stored in the browser's history.

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Calibre 1.45 eBook Reader and Editor Brings Improvements for Kindle Books

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Software

Calibre is mostly used as an eBook converter and reader, but the developer added the option to edit books just a few months ago. Since then, numerous changes and improvements have been made to this particular feature and it looks like there is a lot of work left to do.

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OpenMW 0.31 Has A Ton Of Changes

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Software
Gaming

OpenMW 0.31 implements a large number of game features from saving fog of war state to implementing murder crime to follower fast travel. When it comes to bug fixes, there's over 135 reported bug-fixes.

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Firefox OS Ecosystem Shows Strong Momentum and Expands Across New Devices, Markets and Categories

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox OS has unlocked the mobile ecosystem and is quickly expanding across a broad range of devices and product categories in Europe, Latin America and Asia Pacific. Just one year after the first devices were launched, Firefox OS is now available on seven smartphones offered by five major operators in 15 countries, showing strong signs of ecosystem momentum and widespread industry adoption.

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LibreOffice-from-Collabora 4.2 released to the channel

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LibO

LibreOffice from Collabora is the enterprise-ready build of the widely used Open Source office suite. The newly announced LibreOffice-from-Collabora 4.2 provides an enterprise-hardened build which can be maintained by patch updates for many years.

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KDE Applications and Platform 4.13.3 Is the Last Update in the Series

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KDE

The KDE Project developers have released the third maintenance version for Applications, Platform and Plasma Workspaces, bringing some new, much needed fixes.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software

QEMU 2.1.0 RC2 Open Source Virtualization Software Is Ready for Testing

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Software

QEMU 2.1.0 RC2, a generic open source emulator and virtualizer that can run OSes and programs made for a different machine, has been released and is available for download.

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XBMC 13.2 Beta 1 “Gotham” Arrives with a Ton of Fixes

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Software

It's been several months since the release of the XBMC 13.0 “Gotham,” probably the best and most complete release in the history of this software. The developers implemented some remarkable new features, but it looks like there still are things to fix and changes to be made.

“About a month ago we released our 13.1 version which included several bug fixes compared to the 13.0 release. Because of the fact that not all fixes could be included in that point release, we now are happy to announce a 13.2 beta1 version. This includes an additional list of fixes, that should resolve some of the common problems reported by users. Unfortunately we cannot fix all things reported. Hopefully you will understand. Below you will find a list of most important fixes included in this release.”

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Cloud, open source power TransLink's Web presence

Filed under
OSS
Drupal

It was an aging bespoke application that drove TransLink to seek a new content management system, but it was the strength of the community surrounding the open source project that helped the Queensland public transport agency choose Drupal.

Prior to the switch to Drupal, which began last year, the former TransLink site was partly based on static files and partly on a "home-grown CMS that managed a lot of our custom content such as service disruption and events, so that we could do a little bit of distributed authoring within the organisation," said Natalie Gorring, manager, online products and services, at TransLink.

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KaOS Calms Down KDE

Filed under
KDE
Linux

In keeping with the best-fit-only policy, the KaOS community deliberately keeps this distro's software stores limited. The current inventory is about 2,000 packages. The size will not grow beyond 2,200 packages. KaOS uses Pacman 4.1.2 as the package manager, with Octopi 0.4.0 as graphical front end. This is a good combination, as it's simple and effortless to add or remove software.

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Detailed review of Plasma 5

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

The much awaited Plasma 5 has been announced today, which marks a new chapter in the story of KDE software. Plasma 5 is the next generation desktop by the KDE community; it’s the evolution of KDE’s desktop which started taking a new shape with the release of ‘revolutionary’ KDE 4.0.

Plasma desktop uses the time-tested UI optimized for WIMP (windows, icons, menus and pointer) interface and with 5 it further improved that experience. A lot of work has gone in the code-base which makes the desktop sleeker and more polished. If you are thinking just think oh it’s just a different theme and new icons, it’s not true. Plasma 5 uses the brand new Frameworks 5 and Qt5 which not only improves user-experience but also allows developers to use KDE software in a manner not possible before.

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Mozilla Advances JPEG Encoding with mozjpeg 2.0

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Moz/FF

We’re pleased to announce the release of mozjpeg 2.0. Early this year, we explained that we started this project to provide a production-quality JPEG encoder that improves compression while maintaining compatibility with the vast majority of deployed decoders. The end goal is to reduce page load times and ultimately create an enhanced user experience for sites hosting images.

With today’s release, mozjpeg 2.0 can reduce file sizes for both baseline and progressive JPEGs by 5% on average compared to those produced by libjpeg-turbo, the standard JPEG library upon which mozjpeg is based [1]. Many images will see further reductions.

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FFmpeg 2.2.5 Officially Released

Filed under
Software
Movies

FFmpeg is the leading multimedia framework able to decode, encode, transcode, mux, demux, stream, filter, and play pretty much any media that humans and machines have created.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

“To whom much has been given, much is expected in return” – Free Software economics

Filed under
LibO
OSS
OOo

When it comes to Free Software projects, there’s a profound, deep misunderstanding about who does what and how it’s being done. Using the now overused quote, developers write a code “because they have an itch to scratch”, means that there can be twenty different motivations to contribute to Free Software. No one needs to explain or justify his or her contribution. In the real world, one of the most common motivation is money, be it in the form of a salary, a fee, or a transaction involving the developers to fix whatever bug or develop a new feature. Most of the FOSS projects I know -excluding Firefox- do not pay developers directly for fixing bugs except in very specific circumstances and by definition not on a regular basis. The LibreOffice project is no different. The Document Foundation serves the LibreOffice project by financing its infrastructure, protecting its assets and improving LibreOffice in almost every way except paying for development on a regular basis. What this means, in other terms, is that the Document Foundation does not provide support; nor does it provide service to customers. In this sense, it is not a software vendor like Microsoft or Adobe. This is also one of the reasons why there is no “LTS” version of LibreOffice; because the Document Foundation will not provide a more or less mythical “bug-free version” of LibreOffice without ensuring the developers get paid for this. The healthiest way to do this is to grow an ecosystem of developers and service providers who are certified by the Document Foundation and are able to provide professionals with support, development, training and assistance.

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