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Top GitHub Alternatives to Host Your Open Source Project

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Software

If you are looking to migrate from GitHub, here are some of the best alternatives to GitHub for hosting the source code of your open source project.
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Wine Vulkan Preps For v1.1 Support With Licensing Issues Resolved

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Software
Legal

Now that Vulkan's code licensing issue with Wine has been resolved, the Winevulkan code for supporting Vulkan within Wine to pass onto the host Linux system's Vulkan driver is being updated.

The Wine Vulkan code had been limited to supporting Vulkan 1.0.51 as that was the last release of Vulkan to be under an MIT-style license before migrating to the Apache 2.0 license. Now that there is the exception in place with Vulkan's current license, Roderick Colenbrander has moved forward in updating the winevulkan code.

There's been a lot of changes in that time and Roderick is working on addressing what needs to be modified in the Wine Vulkan code. But for now Winevulkan isn't exposing Vulkan 1.1 support until some of the features can be implemented within the Wine code, so for now it's being advertised as v1.0.76 rather than the current upstream of 1.1.76.

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Free Video Editing Software Avidemux Is Now Available On Flathub

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Software

Avidemux, a popular free video editor, is now available on Flathub, making the latest version easy to install on most Linux distributions.

Flathub is a Linux app repository powered by Flatpak, which allows apps to run on almost any Linux distribution.

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Software: Ardour, Opus, GIMP, Pacman, LibreOffice, Launchpad

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Software
  • Ardour Development Update

        

    It's been a long time since the last release of Ardour, and there's still no schedule or even vague sense of when the next release might appear. I (Paul) felt that our users, and particularly our subscribers, deserved some information about what is and has been going on with development over the last 8 months. I had promised to do this back in December, and it is now long overdue.

  • Ardour Digital Audio Workstation Is Going Through An Architectural Overhaul

    For those wondering what's been going on with the Ardour digital audio workstation cross-platform, open-source software, their developers have posted a status update about their ongoing progress to the project.

    Ardour, for those that don't know, is one of the leading (if not the leading) open-source digital audio workstation software for audio recording, editing, and mixing. It's a mighty impressive piece of software currently, but the developers are working on making it even better.

  • libopus 1.3-rc
  • Opus 1.3 RC1 Released For Open-Source Audio Codec

    Nearly one year after the release of Opus 1.2, the Opus 1.3 release is happening quite soon with Friday marking the availability of the release candidate for this open-source and versatile audio codec implementation.

  • GIMP has moved to Gitlab

    Along with the GEGL and babl libraries, GIMP has moved to a new collaborative programming infrastructure based on Gitlab and hosted by GNOME.

  • GIMP Jumps Aboard The GitLab Bandwagon

    The 2018 trend of migrating open-source project infrastructure to GitLab continues.

    Following the GNOME project as well as FreeDesktop.org and other notable open-source projects migrating to GitLab for their project infrastructure with code hosting, bug management, etc, The GIMP has completed its migration too over to the popular alternative to GitHub.

  • Arch monthly May

    Finally! A new pacman release, this version adds some critical bits for reproducible builds and the pacman repository has been shed of misc tools which are now in pacman-contrib.

  • Best diagramming software: Top Microsoft Visio alternatives

     

    LibreOffice Draw is a vector graphics and flowcharts design tool that's part of the free and open source LibreOffice software suite.
     

    Draw uses smart connectors that make it diagramming simple. Users can define where these connectors adhere to and automatically calculate and display the linear dimensions of their designs to build a variety of different charts and diagrams regardless of skill level.

  • Launchpad news, May 2018

Software: Photo Funnel, ONLYOFFICE, Cachix

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Software
  • Photo Funnel: Easy Photo Import on Linux

    A while ago, I cobbled together Photo Funnel, a simple tool for importing photos and RAW files from storage cards to a Linux machine. Although it wasn’t meant to replace digiKam, I ended up using it as my primary import tool for two reasons: speed and simplicity. But just because it does the job, it doesn’t mean that it can’t be improved. So I’ve spent a couple of evenings tweaking Photo Funnel.

  • New ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors with completely reorganized interface and multiple updates

    Today we are proud to say that our desktop suite has received the new tabbed interface and caught up with multiple fresh features in the latest version. Read why the app is worth updating right now in the article below.

  • Announcing Cachix - Binary Cache as a Service

    The main motivation is to save you time and compute resources waiting for your packages to build. By using a shared cache of already built packages, you'll only have to build your project once.

    This should also speed up CI builds, as Nix can take use of granular caching of each package, rather than caching the whole build.

    Another one (which I personally consider even more important) is decentralization of work produced by Nix developers. Up until today, most devs pushed their software updates into the nixpkgs repository, which has the global binary cache at https://cache.nixos.org.

Software: HandBrake, Plex Media Player, zchunk, Qalculate! and Cherrytree

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Software
  • HandBrake FFmpeg, no more Nvidia 32 bit drivers

    HandBrake has been updated again to track the master branch, as it now uses FFMpeg 4 and no longer libAV 12. This could probably lead to other improvements, like NVENC/CUDA support, more formats, etc.

    Starting with the Nvidia drivers version 396.24 there will be no more 32 bit support, the driver will be 64 bit only. The 32 bit libraries are still included, so Steam and other applications will keep on being supported.

  • Plex Media Player is back!

    Just a small post to notify that Plex Media Player package is back. Now it does not require Conan or Python anymore for building, and you can just build it using standard tools, the dependency issues between the Plex binary packages have been resolved.

  • What is zchunk?

    Over the past few months, I’ve been working on zchunk, a compression format that is designed to allow for good compression, but, more importantly, the ability to download only the differences between an old version of the file and a new version.

    The concept is similar to both zsync and casync, but it has some important differences. Let’s first look at how downloading a zchunk file works.

  • Qalculate! – The Best Calculator Application in The Entire Universe

    I have been a GNU-Linux user and a Debian user for more than a decade. As I started using the desktop more and more, it seemed to me that apart from few web-based services most of my needs were being met with desktop applications within Debian itself.

    One of such applications was the need for me to calculate between different measurements of units. While there are and were many web-services which can do the same, I wanted something which could do all this and more on my desktop for both privacy reasons as well as not having to hunt for a web service for doing one thing or the other. My search ended when I found Qalculate!.

  • Cherrytree – A Feature-Rich Wiki-Style Note-Taking App

    I recently wrote on Thetapad and Zim – both are excellent note-taking applications with their specialty geared towards different users. Today, thanks to suggestions from FossMint readers, I introduce to you Cherrytree.

    Cherrytree is a free and open source note-taking application with wiki-style text formatting, syntax highlighting, and advanced customizability settings.

    Its advanced search function allows you to locate files across the file tree irrespective of their location. It supports keyboard shortcuts, importing and exporting notes, syncing with cloud services like Dropbox, rich text formatting, and password protection to keep your notes secure.

Software: Qikipedia, Code Editors, Cutelyst, Tor, Cockpit, Chrome

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Software
  • Qikipedia – A Browser Extension To Display Wikipedia Summary

    A while ago, we have written a guide that described how to display the summary of any Wikipedia article in Terminal using a command line utility named “Wikit”. Using this utility, we can get the wikipedia summary of the given text right from the terminal window. Today, we are going to discuss about a similar utility named “Qikipedia”. It is a google browser extension that allows you to highlight text from any website, and shows you a summary of the corresponding Wikipedia article, if one exists.

  • 6 Best Vi/Vim-Inspired Code Editors for Linux

    Vim (short for Vi Improved) is a free, open source, powerful, highly configurable and extensible text editor. It has a large and dedicated community of users that are constantly creating useful new scripts and updates to the text editor. Vim supports hundreds of programming languages and file formats making it one of the best cross-platform code editor.

  • Cutelyst 2.4.0 released

    Cutelyst, the C++/Qt web framework got another up.

  • Tor Browser and Selenium

    Many of us use Python Selenium to do functional testing of our websites or web applications. We generally test against Firefox and Google Chrome browser on the desktop. But, there is also a lot of people who uses Tor Browser (from Tor Project) to browse the internet and access the web applications.

    In this post we will see how can we use the Tor Browser along with Selenium for our testing.

  • Cockpit 169

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 169.

  • Chrome 67 Now Available For Linux Users
  • Google Chrome 67 Rolls Out to Linux, Mac, and Windows with 34 Security Fixes

    Google has promoted today the Chrome 67 web browser for Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms to the stable channel, a release that will be available to users in coming days or weeks.

  • Chrome 67 Released, New Version of RaspAnd, SEGA Mega Drive and Genesis Classics Now Available for Linux and More

    Chrome 67 has been released, and it includes several security fixes as well as default support for WebAuthn, which provides "a way to sign up to websites using biometrics like fingerprints or facial images stored in a smartphone, or USB hardware like Yubikey's authentication device", ZDNet reports. Chrome 67 also features new APIs for augmented and virtual reality.

Semi-Automatic LaTeX: KDE’s Kile

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KDE
Software

One reason that I appreciate KDE is that I am always discovering new applications. In fact, I make a point of regularly searching for them. My most recent discovery is Kile, a graphic editor for LaTeX. Kile is not the first of its kind, but, unlike the better known LyX, whose interface resembles a word processor, it makes no attempt to hide the structure that shapes the output. Instead, like the Bluefish editor, it is what I think of as a semi-automatic editor. Instead, users add markup from a list of options in a display in which tags are visible. With this approach, Kile eliminates the drudgery of typing markup while making both troubleshooting and the learning of LaTeX easier.

LaTeX, of course, is one of free software’s legendary applications, with a history that predates Linux. Before the code for OpenOffice.org was released, it was the most sophisticated tool on Linux for complex formatting of text. It remains popular today in academia, largely because of its ability to layout formulas. Despite the fact that the principle behind it is similar to any markup language like XML or HTML,X has a reputation for being difficult to learn. The main difficulty, though, is not so much in the basic concept, or even the fact that tags are not in pairs so much as finding the right markup or extension libraries among the dozens that are available. One advantage of Kile is that it displays a thorough (although possibly not exhaustive) list of tags that are always available in the interface, so that users do not have to remember all the available choices.

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Also: Last Month in AtCore / Atelier

Software: LAN Share, MIXXX, and Chrome 67

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Software

Software Boutique - Linux stuff, 100% discount

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Software

If we judge the Linux GUI package management saga from a purely energy state perspective, we have come a full circle. There was a great GUI tool, it got axed, half a dozen efforts came and went, and we now once again have a program that does what USC did (well almost) five or six years ago. Everything in between was a complete waste of time and effort. But the important thing, from the user perspective, is that we DO have a GUI software manager that actually works. And it's called Software Boutique.

As I've noted in the MATE Beaver review, this is by far the best program of its kind currently on the market, hands down. The list of superlatives is long. But it's elegant, aesthetically pleasing, accurate, fast, robust, simple, and it does a wonderful job of making package management a fun and interesting exercise. And if the little print can be trusted, it should be easy to deploy and use on other distros, too. Of course, this ties into the bigger battle of egos and sandbox development that is Linux. But if we put the Sisyphean politics and bickering aside, then Software Boutique is a superb program, and it should become the standard across the distrospace. Well worth testing, and one of the strong selling points for Ubuntu MATE. Take care, and happy shopping.

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GNOME 3.30 Desktop Environment Gets New Milestone, Beta Expected on August 1

In an email announcement received by Softpedia, developer Michael Catanzaro announces the availability of GNOME 3.29.3, the third of four development milestones before the GNOME 3.30 desktop environment enters beta stages of development. Coming almost a month after GNOME 3.29.2, the GNOME 3.29.3 development milestone appears to be the first where all components are buildable. "This is an accomplishment," said Michael Catanzaro, "I hope we can keep this up going forward." Read more

Fanless Skylake embedded PC loads up on PCIe

Teguar’s fanless, Linux-friendly “TB-5045” embedded PC features a 6th Gen Core CPU, up to 32GB DDR4, triple display support, 4x GbE, 6x USB, 4x serial, 2x external SATA bays, 3x mini-PCIe, and optional dual PCIe slots. Charlotte, North Carolina based Teguar Computers, which is new to the pages of LinuxGizmos, makes a variety of medical PCs, touch-panel computers, and other embedded gear, including a line of Waterproof PCs. The new, fanless TB-5045 box PC prefers to be high and dry, but it should fit in well in many rugged industrial environments. It offers 0 to 50°C support and a rugged steel housing with aluminum heatsink that is said to be resistant against shock and vibration. It also features a wide-range 9-36V DC via a 3-wire input. Read more

Flatpak 1.0 Linux Application Sandboxing & Distribution Framework Is Almost Here

While it's becoming very popular among Linux users as it is more and more adopted by Linux OS vendors, Flatpak is still considered an "under development" technology, and so it's not yet promoted on a mass scale as its rival Snap is by Ubuntu's mother company Canonical. However, Flatpak as it is right now, it's very usable, but it is yet to achieve the 1.0 version milestone, which usually marks a project as mature and ready for mass deployment. And it's now more closer than ever as the development team announced today the availability of the first Flatpak 1.0 pre-release version. Read more Also: Flatpak 1.0 Nears With Today's 0.99.1 Release

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Is Now Certified on Intel's NUC Mini PCs and IoT Boards

Released on April 21, 2016, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) is a long-term supported release that will receive security and software updates for five years, until April 2021, as well as a total of five point releases ending with Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS, which is expected to arrive in early August 2018. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is Canonical's 6th LTS release and the last to use the Unity desktop environment by default. The operating system is compatible with a wide-range of hardware components, including Intel's NUC mini PCs, but now, after a partnership between Intel and Canonical, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is officially certified for NUC devices. Read more