Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software

DXVK 1.3.4

Filed under
Software
  • DXVK 1.3.4 is out with a few quick fixes, plus more updates to Proton GE

    Two bits of Wine related news for you to peruse over this fine Sunday evening, as both DXVK and Proton GE have new releases available.

    First up: the DXVK 1.3.4 maintenance release was just put out to solve a couple urgent issues. One of these is a problem with Winelib builds and the Wine 4.15 release and there's a possible memory leak fixed with games using Direct2D.

    On top of that the game Control has "d3d11.allowMapFlagNoWait" enabled to improve GPU utilization and Quantum Break has a performance issue fixed for NVIDIA and older AMD drivers.

    The other project with a new release is Proton-4.15-GE-4, the unofficial version of Proton for Steam Play that pulls in a bunch of extras. Released today adding in some needed hotfixes for mf_install, an issue with the protonfixes import, the Warframe launcher should be fully working now with a wininet patch from upstream backported, the raw input patch was re-enabled and some updates for gamepad/mouse input.

  • DXVK 1.3.4 Released With More Workarounds, Performance Bits

    DXVK 1.3.4 has a Winelib workaround for builds with Wine 4.15, potential memory leak fixes for games just making use of Direct2D, a new d3d11.allowMapFlagNoWait toggle to help improve GPU utilization, and performance fixes for the game Quantum Break with NVIDIA and older AMD drivers. DXVK 1.3.4 is a small update but not bad for just a week's worth of changes and after several notable recently DXVK updates.

Software: imapautofiler, Draw.io and UpSwift

Filed under
Software
  • imapautofiler 1.8.1

    imapautofiler applies user-defined rules to automatically organize messages on an IMAP server.

  • Draw.io is a free Flowchart and diagram creation software for Windows, Linux, macOS and your browser

    Flowcharts are incredibly useful diagrams to explain process flows. Remember the phishing flow chart that Martin created in 2011? Or the flowchart about flowcharts?

    If you took a computer science class in school or college, you may know how to make one. Even if you don't, it's not difficult to learn how to create flowcharts.

    But how do you make them using a computer? Microsoft Office or Libre Office can be used to create flowcharts. But an application like Draw.io that specializes in drawing diagrams can be a better option. I tested the offline version of draw.io, (and only tested it with flowcharts).

  • UpSwift – Manage IoT & Embedded Linux Devices Easily & Quickly

    UpSwift offers a GUI based management interface to their customers to update, manage, control & diagnose IoT and embedded devices

A Comprehensive Intro to Darktable: A Free Lightroom Alternative

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Anthony Morganti of IAmMrPhotographer.com recently teamed up with photographer and fellow YouTuber Rico Richardson to produce a comprehensive introduction to the popular (and free) Lightroom alternative Darktable. If you’ve been wanting to try this open source RAW editor but don’t know where to start, this video is for you.

Richardson is an expert in Darktable who’s created many a tutorial for the RAW processing software over on his own channel. This 10 minute tutorial is a bit more broad than all that: a beginner’s guide that starts by showing you how to download the software off the Darktable website, moves into a detailed walkthrough of the user interface and available tools, and finishes off with a quick demonstration of Darktable’s powerful masking features in action.

If you already have Darktable downloaded, skip to the 3:58 mark to jump right into the UI; and if you already understand the import settings in the Lighttable tab, you can skip straight to the tools overview and editing demonstration around 7:20.

Read more

Proprietary: Telegram and Flash on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software
  • Telegram Update Adds Message Scheduling, Personal Reminders & New Theme Options [Ed: Proprietary at the server side]

    Messaging scheduling is among the new features added to the hugely popular Telegram messaging service.

    Telegram 1.8.3 (v5.11 on mobile) introduces the ability to schedule messages.

    This feature could prove particularly useful for Telegram group admins and channel owners (hi), as well as those who want to broadcast a missive at a specific time rather than having it posted (or read) straight away.

    To schedule a message in Telegram desktop is easy enough: right click on the ‘Send’ button in the chat toolbar, select the ‘Schedule Message’ option, and pick a date and time. You get a notification when your scheduled message is successfully sent (and presumably no notification if it fails).

    [...]

    You can refer to our guide on how to install Telegram on Ubuntu, Linux Mint and related distro should you want to get the service up running on your system.

  • Adobe Flash and Firefox 68+ in Gentoo Linux

    Though many sites have abandoned Adobe Flash in favour of HTML5 these days, there are still some legacy applications (e.g. older versions of VMWare’s vSphere web client) that depend on it. Recent versions of Firefox in Linux (68+) started failing to load Flash content for me, and it took some digging to find out why. First off, I noticed that the content wouldn’t load even on Adobe’s Flash test page. Second off, I found that the plugin wasn’t listed in Firefox’s about:plugins page.

Kdenlive 19.08.1 released

Filed under
KDE
Software
Movies

The first minor release of the 19.08 series is out with usability fixes.

Read more

Hyper – terminal emulator built with web technologies

Filed under
Software

One of the reasons why I became hooked on Linux was the command line. The command line offers advantages day-to-day because of facets like its scalability, scriptability, simple design, and simple interface. At the command line, there’s so much power at my fingertips. Its continuing flexibility and power remain big draws to this day.

It’s true that some people consider the command line to be arcane and obsolete. They prefer graphical interfaces. And for non-technical people and beginners, few dispute good graphical user interfaces make life easier. But who doesn’t want the best of both worlds?

The power of the command line can be accessed on the desktop by using a terminal emulator. The terminal window allows the user to access a console and all its applications such as command line interfaces (CLI) and text user interface software. Even with sophisticated modern desktop environments packed with administrative tools, other utilities, and productivity software all sporting attractive graphical user interfaces, it remains the case that some tasks are best undertaken with the command line.

The terminal emulator is a venerable but essential tool for everyone using the command line. There are so many terminal emulators available for Linux that the choice is, frankly, bamboozling.

This article looks at Hyper, one of the newer terminal emulators available. It’s built with web technologies – JavaScript, HTML, CSS. The goal of the project is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards. Hyper is based on xterm.js, a front-end component written in TypeScript.

Hyper is cross-platform support running on Linux, macOS, and Windows. It boasts that it’s fully extensible. Let’s see how it fares.

Read more

Albert – An amazing keyboard launcher for Linux

Filed under
Software

Linux has many features and tools that make the user experience very convenient and rich. There are regular updates, a very enthusiastic community that supports you out at every step. In the same quest, today we will learn about an amazing tool called Albert. It is basically a keyboard launcher. Now you may ask, what is a keyboard launcher?

Keyboard launcher is an application that allows you to do things from the keyboard which you normally have to carry out with a mouse. Having one makes your interaction with your computer very easy and quick.

Now, you may be saying, “are you talking about keyboard shortcuts because I already know that”. My replay to this question is, Naah!

Read more

What is TLDR and Explained How to Use it

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Linux command line users must be familiar with "man" command. It stands for manual pages, which means that every Linux command or utility comes with the set of instructions or possible usage of the command. Man pages are of great help while working on the command line, but often, the documentation available via man pages is too lengthy or too confusing to learn. It also does not provide any real life examples too. All it include is the details of what that particular command does, and what are its available switches ( also called options ).

TLDR (Too Long Didn’t Read) is a community driven efforts to improve default Linux man pages, it provides an easy to under documentation for every command or utility and it also demonstrates the usage of the command with pretty simple examples. In this article, we will be learning the process to install TLDR and how to use it to work better on Linux terminals.

Read more

5 of the Best Linux Writing Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Writing is not an easy task, and therefore any assistance provided by a useful app can be very much appreciated, and even totally relied upon. The apps included here needed to satisfy only three criteria to make it to this list: they had to be compatible for Linux, they had to be a writing tool but not a word processing app, and they had to be great.

Read more

Software: Cockpit, Curl and syslog-ng

Filed under
Software
  • Cockpit 202

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 202.

  • Daniel Stenberg: FIPS ready with curl

    It should show that it uses wolfSSL and that all the protocols and features you want are enabled and present. If not, iterate until it does!

  • Peter Czanik: Handling lists in syslog-ng: the in-list() filter

    Recently, a number of quite complex configurations came up while syslog-ng users were asking for advice. Some of these configurations were even pushing the limits of syslog-ng (regarding the maximum number of configuration objects). As it turned out, these configurations could be significantly simplified using the in-list() filter, one of syslog-ng’s lesser known features.

    First, a bit of history. The idea of the in-list() filter came to me while I was listening to Xavier Mertens at a Libre Software Meeting conference talk in France. In his talk, he described how to check log messages for suspicious IP addresses. He used free IP address lists from the Internet (spammer IP addresses, malware command and control IP addresses, etc.) and, using a batch process, he kept checking if any of those were present in the log messages on a nightly basis.

    It occurred to me that all of the above could be done in real-time. Namely, several different parsers capable of extracting IP addresses and other important information from log messages as they arrive are already available in syslog-ng. All that was missing was a tool that could compare the extracted value with a list of values coming from a file. This tool was implemented quickly as a ‘spare time project’ by one of my colleagues. This is how the in-list() filter was born.

Syndicate content