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Software

Leftovers: Software

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  • `MyPaint` An Advanced Alternative To MS Paint for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    MyPaint is a free, open source, simple drawing and painting program for digital painters. It is way better and advanced than MS Windows paint, well the truth is you can't compare this great program with MS Paint. It lets you focus on the art instead of the program. You work on your canvas with minimum distractions, bringing up the interface only when you need it. MyPaint started in 2004 by Martin Renold, he wanted a smooth paint program which could help him digital painting with brush in different way to pressure and speed. MyPaint supports many graphics tablets such as Wacom, and many similar devices. The brush engine of MyPaint is versatile and configurable, and it offers useful, productive tools which a digital painter can expect from a program.

  • Calibre eBook Library and Editor and Library Now Support Latest Kobo Device

    Calibre is an eBook management software that is almost without equal, on any platform that runs it. A few years ago nobody could anticipate that eBooks will take our lives completely, but the rise of eBook readers and the fact that most books are cheaper in digital form, proves that it was inevitable for someone to take matters in his own hands and develop something that can actually manage an entire library.

  • Package managers all the way down

    Package managers are at the core of Linux distributions, but they are currently engulfed in a wave of changes and it's not clear how things will end up. Kristoffer Grönlund started his 2017 linux.conf.au talk on the subject by putting up a slide saying that "everything is terrible awesome". There are a number of frustrations that result from the current state of package management, but that frustration may well lead to better things in the future.

    Grönlund started by asking a simple question: what is a package manager? There are, in fact, two types of package managers out there, and the intersection between them is leading to some interesting problems.

    When most people think of package managers, they are thinking of a distribution package manager like zypper, DNF, or APT. These tools date back to the early days of Linux, when there were few boundaries between users, developers, and administrators; whoever we were, we had to do everything ourselves. Distribution package managers were construction kits that helped us to put our distributions together. They managed dependencies — both build and runtime dependencies, which are different things. They helped users install their software, administrators to keep systems up to date, and distributors to manage licenses.

  • Open Source Photography Software "Darktable" 2.2.2 has been Released

    Darktable is an open source photography workflow application and RAW developer. A virtual lighttable and darkroom for photographers. It manages your digital negatives in a database, lets you view them through a zoomable lighttable and enables you to develop raw images and enhance them.

  • 6 Cool Internet Radio Players For Linux

    There are quite a few Linux applications that can play Internet radio, but I thought I'd make a list of some of the most interesting apps that focus on this.

    The list includes lightweight Internet radio players, a fully fledged desktop application, a command line radio browser and player, as well as a GNOME Shell extension.

  • RcloneBrowser (Rclone GUI) Lets You Manage Multiple Cloud Storage Services From A Single Desktop App

    In case you're not familiar with Rclone, this is a command line tool for synchronizing files from or to cloud storage services, which supports Google Drive, Google Cloud Storage, Dropbox, Microsoft One Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Openstack Swift / Rackspace cloud files / Memset Memstore, Hubic, Yandex Disk, and Backblaze B2.

    Rclone can synchronize files either directly between these cloud services, or to / from your local filesystem.

  • 10 Best Linux Task Managers

    One of the most important things for Linux users is the task management, because all operating systems have mistakes, and Linux isn’t the exception yet. Sometimes, I have troubles with specific applications that collapse and the processes do not stop, it’s very weird, but sometimes it happens. So I use Linux task manager, find the process and finally, I kill it.

  • RPushbullet 0.3.0

    A major new update of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the to your browser, phone, tablet, ... -- or all at once.

  • Release Notes for fish 2.5.0 (released February 3, 2017)

    Starting with version 2.5, fish requires a more up-to-date version of C++, specifically C++11 (from 2011). This affects some older platforms:

  • GIMP 2.8.20 Release

    We are releasing GIMP 2.8.20 with various bug fixes—the most noticeable one being changes to the weird initial user interface language selection on macOS to make it use the user’s preferred language.

  • GNOME's Epiphany Web Browser Lands A Lot More 3.24 Feature Work

    Developers working on GNOME's Web Browser, Epiphany, have prepared the v3.23.5 release as their latest development version in the road towards GNOME 3.24.

Wine 2.1 Development Release

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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • oVirt 4.1 Released With Many New Features

    The oVirt project has announced their major v4.1 release with a lot of new functionality. The oVirt project is an alternative to VMWare's vSphere for open-source virtualization management.

  • Vivaldi 1.7 Web Browser to Hit the Streets Soon with Brand-New History Panel

    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard is informing Softpedia today about the availability of a new snapshot of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.7 web browser, due for release sometime next week.

    Earlier this week we reported that Vivaldi 1.7 is just around the corner and will let you share things more efficiently thanks to a new functionality added to the built-in screenshot tool that allows insertion of certain areas of a web page on the web browser's Notes feature. And now, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.7.735.29 is here to introduce a brand-new history panel.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 30

    This is our first post in 2017 and looks like we must start apologizing. In our previous post we promised news about this blog, but the administrative part slowed us down and the surprise is still not ready. On the bright side, we have quite some news about YaST. So let’s go for it!

  • Snapcraft 2.26 Released For Ubuntu Snappy Packages

    For developers packaging their software in Snaps for Ubuntu and other supported operating systems, Snapcraft 2.26 is now available.

  • How to Global Menu in Plasma 5.9

    Today Plasma 5.9.0 became available in KDE neon User Edition. With it comes the return of global menus along with other awesome sauce features.

    To enable global menus open System Settings, go into the Application Style category, and in the Widget Style settings you will find a tab called Fine Tuning. On this tab you can find the new Menubar options. You can change to either a Title Bar Button, which will tuck the menu into a tiny button into the window decoration bar at the top, or the Application Menu widget, allowing the associated Plasma panel to supply the menu in a fixed location.

  • Google Chrome 57 Enters Beta

    Fresh off last week's release of Chrome 56 with WebGL 2.0 by default, FLAC audio support, and more, is now the Chrome 57 beta.

  • After a Long Wait, Chrome for iOS Goes Open Source
  • The Weather Outside Is Frightful (Or Is It?)
  • How to Install LibreOffice 5.3 on Ubuntu (With One Command)
  • What’s New in LibreOffice 5.3

    Open source’s premiere office suite keeps getting better with each new release. Here’s a look at some of the new features in LibreOffice 5.3.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Weblate 2.11

    Exactly on the schedule, Weblate 2.11 is out today. This release brings extended stats available to users and various other improvements and bug fixes.

  • Quickly Take + Annotate Screenshots on Ubuntu with Shots

    If you’re looking for a simple way to quickly capture desktops and add a few annotations, we’ve found an app that you’ll want to try. Shots (stylised as –shots, but we’ll drop the dashes for this article) is a Electron-based screenshot app available for Windows, macOS and Linux

  • 3 desktop wikis to help organize information

    When you think of the word "wiki," examples like MediaWiki or DokuWiki probably come to mind. They're open source, useful, powerful, and flexible. They can be great tools for collaborating, working on your own, or just organizing the piles of information in your life.

    On the other hand, those wikis are also big. They need quite a bit of additional digital plumbing to run. For many of us, this is overkill, especially if we only want to use wikis on our desktops.

    If you want to get that wiki feeling on your desktop without dealing with all of that plumbing, you easily can. There are a number of solid lightweight wikis that can help you organize your information, keep track of your task, manage your notes, and more.

    Let's take a look at three of those lightweight, desktop wikis.

  • darktable 2.2.3 Open-Source RAW Image Editor Brings Subtraction of Black Levels

    It looks to us like the developers of the darktable open-source and cross-platform RAW image editor are very active lately, and they now announced the availability of the third maintenance update to the major darktable 2.2 stable series of the application.

  • Krita 3.1.2 released!

    Krita 3.1.2, released on February 1st 2017, is the first bugfix release in the 3.1 release series. But there are a few extra new features thrown in for good measure!

  • Krita 3.1.2 Free Digital Painting App Released with Audio Support for Animations

    The Krita Foundation announced the general availability of the first point release to the Krita 3.1 stable series of the open-source, free, and cross-platform digital painting software.

    A major release, Krita 3.1 is the most advanced version of the application featuring full support for Apple's Mac OS X operating system, the ability to render animations to MKV, OGG, MP4, or GIF files through the powerful FFmpeg multimedia backend, a brand-new color selector, a stop-based gradient editor, and much more.

  • MythTV 0.28.1 Open-Source DVR Released with Over 130 Improvements and Bug Fixes

    The major MythTV 0.28 release of the open-source digital video recorder project received today its first point release after almost 10 months since its initial launch.

    MythTV's goal has always been to be the free and open source home entertainment application for GNU/Linux users who want to turn their computers into a home theater PC (HTPC) or media center PC.

  • The Document Foundation announces feature-rich LibreOffice 5.3

    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.3, one of the most feature-rich releases in the history of the application. The office suite is immediately available for Windows, macOS, and Linux, and for the first time also for the private cloud.

  • LibreOffice under the hood: six months of progress to 5.3

    Today we release LibreOffice 5.3.0, the next step in our journey: rich in features indeed - but (understandably) the media like to focus on the things you can see. What about the things you cannot ? the increasingly awesome underpinnings on which we're building the next round of improvements. Again - to see the pretty things people made and (more importantly) who did the heavy lifting checkout the user visible features from many great hackers, translators, UX designers etc. Here I am going to focus on the under-sung heros of making everything else better. There is an official 5.3 wiki page, but I expand on this and dive in more deeply here.

  • LibreOffice 5.3 Is Here

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • tito 0.6.10

    tito 0.6.10 was tagged and built this morning, brought to you almost entirely by the newest tito committer skuznets.

  • Latest Shotwell Releases Enable HTTPS Encryption, Change Your Passwords Now

    Shotwell maintainer Jens Georg announced earlier the availability of two new maintenance versions of the open-source Shotwell image viewer and organizer application for GNU/Linux operating systems.

    Shotwell 0.24.5 and 0.25.4 are now available for download, and it looks like the only change is the use of consistent HTTPS (Secure HTTP) encryption for all the included publishing plugins. This will make sure that your connections to various publishing services supported by the application are kept secure at all time and no one will be able to intercept it and stole your credentials.

  • Vivaldi 1.7 Is Just Around the Corner, Lets You Share Things More Efficiently

    The development cycle of the Vivaldi 1.7 web browser is nearing completion, and Ruarí Ødegaard is today informing us about the availability of a new snapshot that addresses several regressions and implements a couple of new features.

    The Vivaldi developer working on the Linux port of the Chromium-based web browser is reporting that the team is closing in on the final Vivaldi 1.7, and Vivaldi Browser Snapshot 1.7.735.27 is here to focuses on addressing the most important and critical regressions to offer users a polished, stable, and reliable release.

  • Comodo extends endpoint protection to Mac and Linux

    Businesses are increasingly aware of the need to protect their endpoint systems. However, they tend to concentrate most of their efforts on Windows which can leave other platforms vulnerable.

  • You Can Now Install Snap Apps on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

    Yup, you read that right: Ubuntu 14.04, aka the Trusty Tahr, aka the LTS before the most recent LTS.

    While most people reading this post will be doing so from a more recent version of Ubuntu than Trusty, the arrival of Snapd in the Trusty archives means even more folks can fool around with the new software deployment and package management system.

  • Chrome/Chromium's EXO Now Supports Hardware Cursors

    Thanks to David Reveman, there is now hardware cursor support for EXO.

  • Bigger, better LibreOffice 5.3 released for the cloud

    The latest version of LibreOffice is out now for Linux, macOS, Windows, and, at long last, the cloud.

  • LibreOffice 5.3 Released, Called ‘Most Feature-Rich Release’ Ever

    LibreOffice 5.3 is now available to download, and The Document Foundation is calling it 'one of the most feature-rich releases in the history of the application'!

  • Simple Menu Launcher Is The KDE App Launcher I’ve Been Dreaming Of

    I’ve recently started using KDE Plasma again after several years of only poking around in GNOME-based desktops, e.g. Unity, Budgie, Cinnamon, etc.

    While I wouldn’t say I’m fully orientated in K Desktop Environment land just yet I am enjoying the learning curve; playing with a desktop environment as configurable as Plasma is actually rather fun, and encountering quirks and new different workflows is a constructive challenge, making me think about why I ‘prefer’ to do things in certain ways.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Meet Stacer, a System Optimizer App for Ubuntu

    Stacey helps you monitor system resource usage, clear app caches, uninstall unwanted apps, and even stop system processes from running in the background.

  • Open source software tools of DevOps

    Unlike most technology trends, DevOps’ focus is on the collaborative elements of delivery infrastructure bringing together software developers – those who know exactly why they are building a particular piece of software – and operations personnel – those who are maintaining the IT infrastructure. Bridging the silos between the two sides, the early pioneers of DevOps were hoping this would enable IT professionals to make better judgments about how to deploy and integrate software more effectively.

  • 5 DevOps Tools for Logging and Monitoring

    Enter the new wave of powerful open logging and monitoring solutions. Some of these focus on targeted tasks, such as container cluster monitoring and performance analysis, while others qualify as holistic monitoring and alerting toolkits, capable of multi-dimensional data collection and querying.

  • lnav – An Advanced Console Based Log File Viewer for Linux

    LNAV stands for Log file Navigator is an advanced console based log file viewer for Linux. It does the same job how other file viewers doing like cat, more, tail, etc but have more enhanced features which is not available in normal file viewers (especially, it will comes with set of color and easy to read format).

  • PacketFence v6.5 released

    The Inverse team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of PacketFence v6.5.0. This is a major release with new features, enhancements and important bug fixes. This release is considered ready for production use and upgrading from previous versions is strongly advised.

  • Comodo Extends Advanced Endpoint Protection to Mac OS X and Linux Systems

Leftovers: Software and HowTos

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Software
HowTos

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • ClamAV Antivirus Scanner For Linux (Review + Installation + Usage)

    Malware, Viruses and Trojans on Linux are rare but not impossible as many would have you believe. So for the few times, you may need an antivirus ClamAV is an awesome choice.
    Though, I have never used any Antiviruses in Linux but I think one may need in some cases. There is an article on LinuxAndUbuntu that discusses in detail when you might want to use an Antivirus in Linux.

  • Calibre 2.78 Open-Source eBook Organizer Supports Newest Kobo eReader Firmware

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal announced the availability of Calibre 2.78.0, the latest stable version of the popular and open-source ebook library management software for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms.

    Calibre 2.78 comes exactly two weeks after the January 13 release of Calibre 2.77, which was only a bugfix version bringing various improvements to the Edit Book, DOCX output, and E-book Viewer components.

  • Deluge 1.3.13 (BitTorrent Client) Brings Fixes And Changes

    As you may know, Deluge is an open-source, multi-platform, multi-interface (GTK+, web and command-line) BitTorrent client based on libtorrent-rasterbar. The Deluge daemon can run on headless machines with the user-interfaces being able to connect remotely.

  • Icculus: EmScripten Audio Conversion Performance In The Web Browser

    Linux game porter and SDL developer Ryan "Icculus" Gordon has shared some performance measurements when bringing SDL's new audio conversion support within web-browsers using EmScripten.

    Within the latest SDL development code is audio conversion support. Ryan Gordon was testing it by seeing how long it takes to use a 12MB Wav file and re-sample it 500 times.

  • G’MIC 1.7.9 (Standalone Software And GIMP Plugin) Has Been Released

    As you may know, G’MIC (GREYC’s Magic Image Converter) is a editing tool, that can be used with GIMP or as a standalone application, being available for both Linux and Windows. G’MIC provides a window which enables the users to add more than 500 filters over photos and preview the result, in order to give the photos some other flavor.

    G’Mic comes with different interfaces: a command-line tool, an interface for webcam manipulation, build in Qt and a library and plugin for GIMP.

Leftovers: Software

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Kodi v17.0 “Krypton” Release Candidate 4

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Movies
  • Kodi v17.0 “Krypton” Release Candidate 4

    This is the fourth Release Candidate for our upcoming v17.0 “Krypton” which contains our continuous effort to further improve v17.0 before we make it final. Our team will certainly try to tackle as much of the reported problems as possible with the limited resources we have. We do want to note that since we are just a small team some of the reported bugs might not get fixed due to lack of developers or time. As such we would certainly welcome any developer who has the ability to help us out to try and fix the bugs he or she encounters and submit it to our code base for review. We sure would like to thank every one involved with either development, testing or simply helping out others with answering their questions.

  • Kodi 17.0 Is Near With The RC4 Release

    The release of Kodi 17.0 "Krypton" is near and today the fourth release candidate is now available for testing.

  • Kodi 17 "Krypton" Media Center Gets One More Release Candidate, Go Out and Test

    Only two weeks after XBMC Foundation announced the decision of codenaming the Kodi 18 release as "Leia," after the late Carrie Fisher, but also to celebrate 40 years of the Star Wars saga, they are today releasing what it could be the last Release Candidate (RC) version of the upcoming Kodi 17 "Krypton" media center.

    Martijn Kaijser today announced the availability of Kodi 17.0 RC4, which comes about 11 days after the third Release Candidate. Kodi 17 development is ongoing since December 2015, but the first Alpha builds arrived six months later, around May 2016, and it now finally looks like the final release of the open-source media center is nearing its official launch.

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More in Tux Machines

Artificial intelligence/Machine learning

  • Is your AI being handed to you by Google? Try Apache open source – Amazon's AWS did
    Surprisingly, the MXNet Machine Learning project was this month accepted by the Apache Software Foundation as an open-source project. What's surprising about the announcement isn't so much that the ASF is accepting this face in the crowd to its ranks – it's hard to turn around in the software world these days without tripping over ML tools – but rather that MXNet developers, most of whom are from Amazon, believe ASF is relevant.
  • Current Trends in Tools for Large-Scale Machine Learning
    During the past decade, enterprises have begun using machine learning (ML) to collect and analyze large amounts of data to obtain a competitive advantage. Now some are looking to go even deeper – using a subset of machine learning techniques called deep learning (DL), they are seeking to delve into the more esoteric properties hidden in the data. The goal is to create predictive applications for such areas as fraud detection, demand forecasting, click prediction, and other data-intensive analyses.
  • Your IDE won't change, but YOU will: HELLO! Machine learning
    Machine learning has become a buzzword. A branch of Artificial Intelligence, it adds marketing sparkle to everything from intrusion detection tools to business analytics. What is it, exactly, and how can you code it?
  • Artificial intelligence: Understanding how machines learn
    Learning the inner workings of artificial intelligence is an antidote to these worries. And this knowledge can facilitate both responsible and carefree engagement.
  • Your future boss? An employee-interrogating bot – it's an open-source gift from Dropbox
    Dropbox has released the code for the chatbot it uses to question employees about interactions with corporate systems, in the hope that it can help other organizations automate security processes and improve employee awareness of security concerns. "One of the hardest, most time-consuming parts of security monitoring is manually reaching out to employees to confirm their actions," said Alex Bertsch, formerly a Dropbox intern and now a teaching assistant at Brown University, in a blog post. "Despite already spending a significant amount of time on reach-outs, there were still alerts that we didn't have time to follow up on."

Red Hat News

Container-friendly Alpine Linux may get Java port

Alpine Linux, a security-focused lightweight distribution of the platform, may get its own Java port. Alpine is popular with the Docker container developers, so a Java port could pave the way to making Java containers very small. A proposal floated this week on an OpenJDK mailing list calls for porting the JDK (Java Development Kit), including the Java Runtime Environment, Java compiler and APIs, to both the distribution and the musl C standard library, which is supported by Alpine Linux. The key focus here is musl; Java has previously been ported to the standard glibc library, which you can install in Alpine, but the standard Alpine release switched two years ago to musl because it’s much faster and more compact Read more

OSS and Linux Foundation Work

  • Using Open Source Software to Speed Development and Gain Business Advantage
    Last week, we started by defining “Open Source” in common terms -- the first step for any organization that wants to realize, and optimize, the advantages of using open source software (OSS) in their products or services. In the next few articles, we will provide more details about each of the ways OSS adds up to a business advantage for organizations that use and contribute to open source. First, we’ll discuss why many organizations use OSS to speed up the delivery of software and hardware solutions.
  • Linux Foundation Creates New Platform for Network Automation
  • Tying together the many open source projects in networking
    There are a lot of pieces to the ongoing network transformation going up and down the stack. There's the shift away from proprietary hardware. There's the to need to manage complex network configurations. Add subscriber management and a wide range of other necessary functions. Add customer-facing services. All of those pieces need to fit together, integrate with each other, and interoperate. This was the topic of my conversation with Heather Kirksey, who heads up the Open Platform for Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV) project when we caught up at the Open Source Leadership Summit in mid-February. OPNFV is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project which focuses on the system integration effort needed to tie together the many other open source projects in this space, such as OpenDaylight. As Heather puts it: "Telecom operators are looking to rethink, reimagine, and transform their networks from things being built on proprietary boxes to dynamic cloud applications with a lot more being in software. [This lets them] provision services more quickly, allocate bandwidth more dynamically, and scale out and scale in more effectively."
  • Master the Open Cloud with Free, Community-Driven Guides
    One of the common criticisms of open source in general, especially when it comes to open cloud platforms such as OpenStack and ownCloud, is lack of truly top-notch documentation and training resources. The criticism is partly deserved, but there are some free documentation resources that benefit from lots of contributors. Community documentation and training contributors really can make a difference. In fact, in a recent interview, ClusterHQ’s Mohit Bhatnagar said: “Documentation is a classic example of where crowdsourcing wins. You just can’t beat the enthusiasm of hobbyist developers fixing a set of documentation resources because they are passionate about the topic.”
  • OpenStack Ocata Nova Cells Set to Improve Cloud Scalability
    Among the biggest things to land in the OpenStack Ocata cloud platform release this week is the Cells v2 code, which will help enable more scale and manageability in the core Nova compute project. Nova is one of the two original projects (along with Swift storage) that helped launch OpenStack in June 2010. The original Nova code, which was written by NASA, enables the management of virtualized server resources.