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Software: Papyrus, Gnocchi, MenuLibre

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  • Papyrus – A Different Note Manager with Better Security

    Papyrus is an open-source and multi-platform base note manager with a primary focus on social features and privacy. It is developed by Aseman, the same company behind Cutegram, an excellent alternative to Telegram’s desktop client for Linux.

    It prides itself on being smart, easy, secure, modern, and different; with a User Interface that is user-friendly and will be intuitive enough for anybody to install the app and get on with creating, syncing, and sharing notes.

  • Gnocchi 4.2 release

    The time of the release arrived. A little more than three months have passed since the latest minor version, 4.1, has been released. There are tons of improvement and a few nice significant features in this release!

  • MenuLibre 2.1.5 Released

    With improved support for Budgie, KDE, and MATE desktop environments, MenuLibre 2.1.5 continues to provide one of the best menu editing experiences for the Linux desktop.

  • MenuLibre 2.1.5 Menu Editor Adds Budgie & KDE Plasma Support

    MenuLibre is the menu editor program supporting's Desktop Entry Specification and supports most desktop environments out there for customizations of their menus.

    Today's MenuLibre 2.1.5 release notably adds support for menu editing on the Budgie and KDE Plasma desktop environments. This adds to MenuLibre officially supporting GNOME, LXDE, LXQt, Pantheon, Unity, and Xfce.


Software and Games: XenServer Clone, Rancher, GRV, Flatpak, Steam and Godot

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  • New Open Source Project Takes Aim at XenServer

    An initial Kickstarter campaign to raise $7,500 to begin development of a XenServer clone has already pulled in over $32,000.

  • Rancher – A Complete Container Management Platform For Production Environment

    Docker is a cutting-edge software used for containerization, that is used in most of IT companies to reduce infrastructure cost.

    By default docker comes without any GUI, which is easy for Linux administrator to manage it and it’s very difficult for developers to manage. When it’s come to production then it’s very difficult for Linux admin too. So, what would be the best solution to manage the docker without any trouble.

  • GRV - A Tool to View Git Repo from Linux Terminal

    GRV is an opensource tool to display git repository on Linux terminal. This tool provides screens to view refs, branches and diffs in separate tabs. The behaviour and style can be customized through configuration. A query language can be used to filter refs and commits. In this article, I will show GRV features and installation steps on Ubuntu 16.04.


  • Flatpak, Steam Cloud, and XDG Base Directories

    If you’ve installed Steam on Linux through Flathub, chances are that Steam Auto-Cloud — Steam’s free game progress synchronization service — won’t work for many of your games that are built with the markets most popular game engines. I have dug into why it isn’t working, and discuss two possible solutions to fix the problem.

    Disclaimer: The Steam for Flatpak package on Flathub is a third-party community effort and isn’t endorsed nor supported by Valve Corporation.

    I’ll need to establish quite a bit of context regarding where games and applications store their configuration files and user data, and how they decide on where to store it. If you’re already familiar with the XDG Base Directory specification, you can glance at the tables and skip straight to the third section.

  • Open-source game dev tool Godot Engine adds VR support

Software: stress-ng, RVowpalWabbit, Biogenesis

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  • stress-ng V0.09.15

    It has been a while since my last post about stress-ng so I thought it would be useful to provide an update on the changes since V0.08.09.

    I have been focusing on making stress-ng more portable so it can build with various versions of clang and gcc as well as run against a wide range of kernels. The portability shims and config detection added to stress-ng allow it to build and run on a wide range of Linux systems, as well as GNU/HURD, Minix, Debian kFreeBSD, various BSD systems, OpenIndiana and OS X.

  • RVowpalWabbit 0.0.12

    And yet another boring little RVowpalWabbit package update, now to version 0.0.12, and still in response to the CRAN request of not writing files where we should not (as caught by new tests added by Kurt). I had misinterpreted one flag and actually instructed to examples and tests to write model files back to the installed directory. Oops. Now fixed. I also added a reusable script for such tests in the repo for everybody's perusal (but it will require Linux and bindfs).

  • Evolving Your Own Life: Introducing Biogenesis

    The top of the window gives you the current statistics, including the time, the number of organisms, how many are dead, and the oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. It also provides a bar with the relative proportions of the genes.

    Below this pane is a list of some remarkable organisms within your world. These are organisms that have had the most children, the most victims or those that are the most infected. This way, you can focus on organisms that are good at the traits you're interested in.

    On the right-hand side of the window is a display of the world history to date. The top portion displays the history of the population, and the bottom portion displays the history of the atmosphere. As your world continues evolving, click the update button to get the latest statistics.

    This software package could be a great teaching tool for learning about genetics, the environment and how the two interact. If you find a particularly interesting organism, be sure to share it with the community at the project website. It might be worth a look there for starting organisms too, allowing you to jump-start your explorations.

Wine 3.1 Released

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  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.1 is now available.

  • Wine 3.1 Released As The First Step Towards Wine 4.0

    With two weeks having passed since the big Wine 3.0 release, the Wine crew is back to their bi-weekly development releases.

    Wine 3.1 is the first bi-weekly development snapshot towards what will eventually become the Wine 4.0 stable release by this time next year, given the project's shift to an annual release cadence.

    Wine 3.1 adds Kerberos authentication support, window class redirections for Common Controls 6, support for X11 ARGB visuals, a DOSBox requirement for running DOS executables, and a total of 29 known bug fixes. The bug fixes range from fixing Qt5 applications to Grand Theft Auto V issues to Doom 4 / DOOM 2016 problems and other Windows-on-Linux gaming issues.

Software and Games: Laptop Mode Tools, Sylpheed, Telegram, Plasma Mobile and More

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  • Laptop Mode Tools 1.72

    I'm pleased to announce the 1.72 release of Laptop Mode Tools. Major changes include the port of the GUI configuration utility to Python 3 and PyQt5.

  • Laptop Mode Tools 1.72 Ported To Python 3 & PyQt5

    For those making use of laptop-mode-tools as one of several Linux power saving tools with this one designed to improve Linux laptop battery life, version 1.72 is now available after more than one year of development.

  • Sylpheed 3.7.0

    Sylpheed is a simple, lightweight but featureful, and easy-to-use e-mail client distributed under the GNU GPL (the library part is GNU LGPL). You can freely use, modify and redistribute it under the license. Sylpheed provides intuitive user-interface. Sylpheed is also designed for keyboard-oriented operation, so Sylpheed can be widely used from beginners to power users.

  • Cooler Unofficial Telegram Apps are on the Way

    Telegram is a cross-platform messaging service analogous to WhatsApp, but with a much broader set of features. You can have public channels and groups, for instance, and run bots.

    Telegram has official apps for pretty much every major operating system out there, including Android, iOS, macOS, Windows and Linux.

  • Write-up for SoK Project – OpenQA Plasma Mobile

    KDE Goal: Usability and Productivity proposed by Nate Graham, is one of the three goals selected by KDE. This goal will focus on polishing our basic software so everyone will be delighted to use it. One of important aspect of Usability and Productivity is focus on quality assurance.

    In this Season of KDE (SoK) 2018, I am working on “OpenQA Plasma Mobile” project. This project indirectly helps to achieve the goal of Usability and Productivity as it would work to get the higher quality version of the mobile by creating integration testing for it. It would make it easier to test the common operations of the mobile.

  • Powerless is quite possibly one of the worst FPS games I've ever played

    Thanks to Steam's new curator system, we get sent keys to various games where developers want us to review it. I took a look at Powerless [Steam] and I was not impressed.

    Sometimes we get sent really interesting games I've never heard about through our Steam Curator, like HYPERNOVA: Escape from Hadea. Then there's times like this, where I'm quite literally telling you not to buy a game—which is incredibly rare for me to do so.

  • XCOM 2 for Linux has been updated, also there's a new XCOM 2 Collection

    A little late, but better late than never. Feral Interactive have pushed out an updated build of XCOM 2 [Steam] for Linux. There's also now the XCOM 2 Collection you can buy.

  • Single-player first-person dungeon crawler 'Delver' has released, the SteamOS icon has also returned

    Delver [Steam, Official Site] is a positively rated single-player first-person dungeon crawler, which has just today left Early Access. It has also seen the return of the SteamOS icon for it.

Software: Curl, AtCore, PiCluster, Prometheus, Vivaldi

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  • Reducing 2038-problems in curl

    libcurl is very portable and is built and used on virtually all current widely used operating systems that run on 32bit or larger architectures (and on a fair amount of not so widely used ones as well).

    This offers some challenges. Keeping the code stellar and working on as many platforms as possible at the same time is hard work.

  • AtCore 1.0.0 Release.

    Today I would like to announce the release of AtCore 1.0.0. This is the first stable release for AtCore. Since its the first release and we have not written a “real” client for it yet we include our test GUI. If you own a 3D Printer you are encouraged to try AtCore for at least one print job.

  • PiCluster 2.3 is out!

    PiCluster aims to provide an easy-to-use solution to manage your Docker containers. A lot of work has gone into development over the past several months and  I am pleased to announce PiCluster 2.3! Let’s take a look at what is new in this release.

  • Changes in Prometheus 2.0

    2017 was a big year for the Prometheus project, as it published its 2.0 release in November. The new release ships numerous bug fixes, new features and, notably, a new storage engine that brings major performance improvements. This comes at the cost of incompatible changes to the storage and configuration-file formats. An overview of Prometheus and its new release was presented to the Kubernetes community in a talk held during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon. This article covers what changed in this new release and what is brewing next in the Prometheus community; it is a companion to this article, which provided a general introduction to monitoring with Prometheus.

  • Vivaldi 1.14 Debuts as World's First Web Browser to Feature Vertical Reader Mode

    Vivaldi Technologies announced today the release and general availability of the Vivaldi 1.14 web browser, which introduces several new features, optimizations, and bug fixes.

    Vivaldi 1.14 not only celebrates the project's third anniversary, but it becomes world's first web browser to introduce a vertical reader mode, which will benefit users of Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional, Japanese, and Korean languages. They can use the new vertical mode to more comfortably view and read texts in their languages in a distraction-free reader mode.

Software: DNF, CTparental, DVD Ripperers, and CMS

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  • DNF Package Manager Is Now Available On Clear Linux

    While Clear Linux may be extremely performant as shown in our many benchmarks, its default repository serving "bundles" (their task-based approach to package management) can be a bit light if wanting to use this Intel open-source Linux distribution on the desktop. There has been yum available via a bundle while now next-gen Yum, DNF, is also now available on Clear Linux.

  • CTparental - Featured Parental Control Tool for Linux

    CTparental is a parental control tool used to control how someone uses the computer, either for internet browsing or any other specific Computer usage. Design of CTparental was motivated by existing tools like iptables, dnsmasq, inguardian Privoxy which independently can do some parts but missing other pieces. So in essence, CTparental leverage all these tools to create a fully-fledged parental control solution with an intuitive and easy to use web interface powered by lighttpd. Now that you know what CTparental, we can go ahead and install it on our Operating system. We'll cover installation for Ubuntu 16.04 and Debian 9 since these are the latest release of both distributions as of this writing.

  • Top 5 Linux DVD RIP Software

    A DVD ripper software allows you to copy the content of a DVD to a hard disk drive. You transfer video on DVDs to different formats. You can make a backup of DVD content. One can convert DVD video for playback on media players, streaming, and mobile phone. A few DVD rippers software can copy protected disks so that you can make discs unrestricted and region-free.

  • Open Source CMS: 12 Great Website Creation Tools

    The more open source CMSs surfaced, the more extensible they became. Well, some open source CMSs focused on a particular thing while most of them tried to become an “all-in-one CMS” – with the help of which you can design and customize your website as you’d prefer.

    With the advancements in CMS’, you do not need to hire a web developer to set up your website – even if you want to create an e-commerce platform. You can do it all by yourself – without requiring any coding skills. Yes, it’s that easy!

Software: BuildStream, tmux and More

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  • How BuildStream uses OSTree

    I’ve been asked a few times about the relationship between BuildStream and OSTree. The answer is a bit complicated so I decided to answer the question here.

    OSTree is a content-addressed content store, inspired in many ways by Git but optimized for storing trees of binary files rather than trees of text files.

    BuildStream is an integration tool which deals with trees of binary files, and at present it uses OSTree to help with storing, identifying and transferring these trees of binary files.

    I’m deliberately using the abstract term “trees of binary files” here because neither BuildStream or OSTree limit themselves to a particular use case. BuildStream itself uses the term “artifact” to describe the output of a build job and in practice this could be the set of development headers and documentation for library, a package file such as a .deb or .rpm, a filesystem for a whole operating system, a bootable VM disk image, or whatever else.

  • tmux – A Powerful Terminal Multiplexer For Heavy Command-Line Linux User

    tmux stands for terminal multiplexer, it allows users to create/enable multiple terminals (vertical & horizontal) in single window, this can be accessed and controlled easily from single window when you are working with different issues.

    It uses a client-server model, which allows you to share sessions between users, also you can attach terminals to a tmux session back. We can easily move or rearrange the virtual console as per the need. Terminal sessions can freely rebound from one virtual console to another.


  • Graphics and music tools for game development

    In early October, our club, Geeks and Gadgets from Marshall University, participated in the inaugural Open Jam, a game jam that celebrated the best of open source tools. Game jams are events where participants work as teams to develop computer games for fun. Jams tend to be very short—only three days long—and very exhausting. announced Open Jam in late August, and more than three dozen games were entered into the competition.

    Our club likes to create and use open source software in our projects, so Open Jam was naturally the jam we wanted to participate in. Our submission was an experimental game called Mark My Words. We used a variety of free and open source (FOSS) tools to develop it; in this article we'll discuss some of the tools we used and potential stumbling blocks to be aware of.

  • GNOME Tweaks 3.28 Progress Report 1

    A few days ago, I released GNOME Tweaks 3.27.4, a development snapshot on the way to the next stable version 3.28 which will be released alongside GNOME 3.28 in March. Here are some highlights of what’s changed since 3.26.

  • Chromium 64 – and 32bit pain

    The new release of the Chromium sources gives us version 64 of Google’s browser. I have created Slackware packages for you, but that was not entirely trivial.

    The Chromium compilation on my 32bit Slackware OS kept failing on the embedded ffmpeg. I am afraid the fact that some of the bigger distros are dropping 32bit variants starts showing and things are coming apart at the seams.

    When you are a developer and there’s no 32bit release of your favorite OS, this makes it quite difficult to test the validity of code paths when you only compile and test your code on a 64bit platform. This is what’s happening with Google’s Chromium code and it will probably only get worse.

Software: Linux Partition Managers and GNOME Photo

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  • Top 5 Linux Partition Managers

    There are many programs out there that help users manage partitions on their drives. Some, like fdisk, are command-line tools. Others have a GUI (graphical user interface), like GParted. I shall demonstrate, today, five very good Linux partition managers, both graphical and text-only.​

  • GNOME Photos: an overview of thumbnailing

    From time to time, I find myself being asked about various details about how content is thumbnailed in GNOME Photos, and the reasons behind various implementation decisions. I can never remember all the details, and always have to dig through Git history and bug reports across multiple modules to come up with an answer. I am hoping that this brain dump will be more persistent than my memory, and more holistic than random comments here and there.

Lollypop Music Player Sweetens its UI with Responsive Design

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But GTK fans needn’t feel like they’re missing out. Lollypop — arguably the best modern desktop music player for GNOME — is working on a responsive design too.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Release Party, Fedora Diversity, Critical Firefox Fix

Microsoft Openwashing and Revisionism

  • Microsoft joins effort to cure open source license noncompliance [Ed: Pushing Microsoft lies under the false pretenses that Microsoft plays along with the GPL (it violates, smears and undermines it)]
  • Microsoft joins group working to 'cure' open-source licensing issues [Ed: Mary Jo Foley uses this initiative to whitewash Microsoft after it repeatedly violated the GPL and attacked it publicly, behind the scenes etc. And watch the image she uses: a lie.]
    It's kind of amazing that just over a decade ago, Microsoft was threatening Linux vendors by claiming free and open-source software infringed on 235 of Microsoft's patents. In 2007, Microsoft was very openly and publicly anti-GPLv3, claiming it was an attempt "to tear down the bridge between proprietary and open source technology that Microsoft has worked to build with the industry and customers."
  • Today's channel rundown - 19 March 2018
    The six have committed to extending additional rights "to cure open source license noncompliance". The announcement was made by Red Hat, which says the move will lead to greater cooperation with distributors of open source software to correct errors. In a statement, Red Hat referenced widely used open source software licenses, GNU General Public License (GPL) and GNU Lesser General Public License, which cover software projects including the Linux kernel. GPL version 3 offers distributors of the code an opportunity to correct errors and mistakes in license compliance.
  • Tails Security Update, Companies Team Up to Cure Open Source License Noncompliance, LG Expanding webOS and More
    According to a Red Hat press release this morning: "six additional companies have joined efforts to promote greater predictability in open source licensing. These marquee technology companies—CA Technologies, Cisco, HPE, Microsoft, SAP, and SUSE—have committed to extending additional rights to cure open source license noncompliance. This will lead to greater cooperation with distributors of open source software to correct errors and increased participation in open source software development."

GNOME: New Flow, GNOME 3.28, New Shotwell

  • GitLab + Flatpak – GNOME’s full flow
    In this post I will explain how GitLab, CI, Flatpak and GNOME apps come together into a (imho) dream-come-true full flow for GNOME, a proposal to be implemented by all GNOME apps.
  • GNOME 3.28 released & coming to Fedora 28
    Last week, The GNOME project announced the release of GNOME 3.28. This major release of the GNOME desktop is the default desktop environment in the upcoming release of Fedora 28 Workstation. 3.28 includes a wide range of enhancements, including updates to Files (nautilus), Contacts, Calendar, Clocks and the on-screen keyboard. Additionally, the new application Usage is added to “make it easy to diagnose and resolve performance and capacity issues”
  • Shotwell Photo Manager Just Got a Big Performance Boost
    A new version of the Shotwell photo manager and editor is available to download. Shotwell 0.28 “Braunschweig” arrives half a year later than originally planned but hasn’t shirked on improvements or bug fixes during the wait. In all some 60 bugs have been closed since the Shotwell 0.27 release last year...

Graphics: Mesa/Mali, Wayland 1.15 Beta, and Mesa 17.3.7 RC2

  • Reverse-Engineering of ARM Mali "Midgard" Now Has A Working NIR Shader Compiler
    Earlier this year work on the "Chai" open-source Mali T700 GPU driver resumed with an aim to get a working Mesa driver for this "Midgard" graphics architecture. There's still a long battle ahead, but their NIR shader compiler is beginning to work. Alyssa Rosenzweig remains the main developer working on this Chai driver effort but with using some remnants done by Luc and Connor during the Lima driver days. Her focus lately has been on assembler and shader support for this reverse-engineered driver for ARM Mali graphics.
  • Wayland 1.15 Beta Released With Weston 4.0 Beta
    The beta releases are available today of Wayland 1.15 and the Weston 4.0 reference compositor. Wayland 1.15 is another relatively modest cycle. Wayland 1.15 pulls in libwayland-egl where as before that library was part of Mesa, making some semantics of Wayland more clear in the documentation, improvements to wayland-scanner, and some minor API additions.
  • Mesa 17.3.7 RC2 Issued With Even More Patches
    Last week the release candidate of Mesa 17.3.7 was issued with more than 50 patches queued. That count grew more over the weekend resulting in an additional release candidate. Mesa point releases tend to get just one RC and a few days of testing before going gold, but on top of the 50 patches last week another handful of patches were since proposed and queued up for this increasingly large point release. The very latest patches include a RADV Vulkan driver fix by Feral Interactive, and several other RADV and Intel Vulkan fixes.