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Wine 4.0.2 Released

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine maintenance release 4.0.2 is now available.

  • Wine 4.0.2 Released With 66 Bug Fixes

    Wine 4.0.2 is out today as the second stable point release to this year's Wine 4.0 cycle.

    As is customary for Wine stable point releases, only bug fixes are allowed in while new features come by way of the bi-weekly development releases that will lead up to the Wine 5.0 release in early 2020.

  • The stable Wine 4.0.2 release is now available

    If you prefer to walk on the calmer side of life, the Wine 4.0.2 release has been made available today.

    As it's just a "maintenance" release, there's no big new features which are reserved for the current 4.xx series currently at 4.14 released on August 17th.

    With that in mind they noted 66 bugs being marked as solved. These bugs include issues with Worms 2, Warframe, Rogue Squadron 3D, Settlers III, Mass Effect, F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin, The Sims and plenty more.

  • Linux Gaming FINALLY Doesn't SUCK!

6 Best Log Management Tools For Linux in 2019

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Server
Software

Before we can talk about log management, let’s define what a log is. Simply defined, a log is the automatically-produced and time-stamped documentation of an event relevant to a particular system. In other words, whenever an event takes place on a system, a log is generated. Systems and devices will generate logs for different types of events and many systems give administrators some degree of control over which event generates a log and which doesn’t.

As for log management, It is simply referring to the processes and policies used to administer and facilitate the generation, transmission, analysis, storage, archiving and eventual disposal of large volumes of log data. Although not clearly stated, log management implies a centralized system where logs from multiple sources are collected. Log management is not just log collection, though. It is the management part which is the most important. And log management systems often have multiple functionalities, collecting logs being just one of them.

Once logs are received by the log management system, they need to be standardized into a common format as different systems format logs differently and include different data. Some start a log with the date and time, some start it with an event number. Some only include an event ID while others include a full-text description of the event. One of the purposes of log management systems is to ensure that all collected log entries are stored in a uniform format. This will event correlation and eventual searching much easier down the line.

Even correlation and searching are two additional major functions of several log management systems. The best of them feature a powerful search engine that allows administrators to zero-in on precisely what they need. Correlation functions will automatically group related events, even if they are from different sources. How—and how successfully—different log management system accomplish that is a major differentiating factor.

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CoreCtrl: A Radeon Settings Alternative For Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Software

It’s a frustrating reality for Linux users that Windows software counterparts tend to be better. They may offer greater functionality, better design, and be easier-to-use. There are some exceptions, such as with the NVIDIA Linux GPU driver, which offers two features the Windows version doesn’t: temperature monitoring, and fan control. For the most part, though, things like driver control panels are a scarcity in Linux.

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Also: New Intel Lightning Mountain SoC Appears in Linux Code

Gammy: Adaptive Screen Brightness Tool For Linux

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Software

Gammy, an adaptive screen brightness GUI tool that that was originally only available for Microsoft Windows, was ported to Linux (X11 only) recently.

The Qt5 application takes a screenshot periodically, then gradually adjusts the pixel brightness based on the screen (screenshot) contents, dimming the screen if its content is too bright, or brightening the screen if its content is too dark. This is especially useful for reducing eye strain when switching between dark and light windows.

The Gammy settings allows setting a minimum and maximum brightness, and an offset (the offset adds to the screen brightness, with a higher value meaning a brighter image). Also, because it conflicts with Redshift, the Gammy developer decided to add basic temperature control, which you'll also find in the application settings.

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Top 3 Video Players for Ubuntu

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Software
Ubuntu

There are a lot of free and open-source video players available for Ubuntu. Most of them do the basic job pretty well and you do not miss anything from Windows that you could use on Ubuntu. However, some players provide additional features and you can pick which one would suit you best depending on the feature list. In this article, we will give you an introduction to some famous video players for Ubuntu. We will also tell you where to find their websites and how to install them on Ubuntu. All of these players can be reliably downloaded graphically from the Ubuntu Software but we will also explain other methods of installation for educational purposes. Also, some methods let you install the latest available version of the software from the Internet so we will not miss out on those.

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Also: Translatium – Simply Yet Powerful Translation Tool For Linux

Flameshot is a brilliant screenshot tool for Linux

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Software

The default screenshot tool in Ubuntu is alright for basic snips but if you want a really good one you need to install a third-party screenshot app.

Shutter is probably my favorite, but I decided to give Flameshot a try. Packages are available for various distributions including Ubuntu, Arch, openSuse and Debian. You find installation instructions on the official project website.

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Akaunting: a web-based accounting system

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Software
Reviews

One of these years, LWN will have a new accounting system based on free software. That transition has not yet happened, though, despite the expending of a fair amount of energy into researching alternatives. Your editor recently became aware of a system called Akaunting, so a look seemed worthwhile. This tool may have the features that some users want, but it seems clear that your editor's quest is not done yet.

As an aside, additional motivation for this effort came in the form of an essentially forced upgrade to QuickBooks 2019 — something that QuickBooks users have learned to expect and dread. There appear to be no new features of interest in this release, but it does offer a newly crippled data import mechanism and routine corruption of its database. If your editor didn't know better, he might just conclude that proprietary software is buggy, unreliable, and unfixable.

[...]

The system is written in PHP and JavaScript; the code is licensed under GPLv3. Akaunting is able to use MySQL, PostgreSQL, or SQLite to store the actual data. It is, as one might expect given the implementation languages, designed to run as a web application; one can install it on a handy machine, but Akaunting (the company) also offers to host accounts free of charge on its own servers. The company promises "we cover it, for free, forever" — a pretty big promise for a free-software startup with a minimal track record.

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How To Share Files Anonymously And Securely: Linux Alternatives to Google Drive

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GNU
Linux
Software

The ability to share files regardless of the physical distance and almost instantaneously is one of the greatest characteristics of the Internet. With 4.3 billion Internet users at the beginning of 2019, the amount of data transferred over the Web is almost unimaginable.

But not all file-sharing services are created equal. In the era where personal data is the most valuable currency we can spend, it is important to ensure we send files over the Internet in a secure and anonymous way.

Read to find out why mainstream file-sharing services are not your best bet and how to pick an alternative solution.

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Announcing notqmail

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Software

Okay, that’s not entirely true. While qmail hasn’t been updated by its original author, a group of respected users created netqmail, a series of tiny updates that were informed, conservative, and careful. By their design, it was safe for everyone running qmail to follow netqmail, so everyone did. But larger changes in the world of email — authentication, encryption, and ever-shifting anti-spam techniques — remained as puzzles for each qmail administrator to solve in their own way. And netqmail hasn’t been updated since 2007.

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Also: Announcing notqmail

7 Great Linux Statistical Analysis Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
Sci/Tech

Science is the effort of seeking to comprehend how the physical world works. From observation and experimentation, science uses physical evidence of natural phenomena to compile data and analyze the collated information.

In modern research it is essential for scientists to keep abreast of the latest statistical software. Just like the fast moving world of research, developments in statistical software and methods continue to abound. Making full use of the improvements in computer software helps to advance the pace of research.

Science really prospers and advances when individuals share the results of their experiments with others in the scientific community. There is a certain logic that scientific software should therefore be released in a freely distributable environment.

Linux is particularly strong in the field of open source statistical software. The purpose of this article is to identify software for performing statistical analysis. This type of software helps to summarize data in a shorter form, and helps scientists understand a concept or representation and make possible predictions based on this understanding.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle launches completely autonomous operating system

Together, these two solutions provide automated patching, updates, and tuning. This includes 100 percent automatic daily security updates to the Linux kernel and user space library. In addition, patching can be done while the system is running, instead of a sysadmin having to take systems down to patch them. This reduces downtime and helps to eliminate some of the friction between developers and IT, explained Coekaerts. Read more

Software: Zotero, PulseCaster and Qt Port of SFXR

  • Zotero and LibreOffice

    If you’re working with LibreOffice and need to create a bibliography, this software makes it simple to manage your citations. You can tell how few people use LibreOffice’s Bibliography Database by the fact that a bug that would take 10 minutes to fix has survived since 2002. Instead, those who need bibliographies or citations rely on other software such as Zotero, which can be integrated into LibreOffice with an extension. That robust bug is that the Citation Format in the database table is called the Short Name in the input fields. Even more confusing, the examples give an arbitrary name, when to work with the citation insertion tool in Insert | Table of Contents and Index | Insert Bibliography Entry, it should in a standard form, such as (Byfield: 2016) for the MLA format. Add the fact that a single database is used for all files – an absurdity in these memory-rich days – and the neglect of the Bibliography Database is completely understandable.

  • PulseCaster 0.9 released!

    For starters, PulseCaster is now ported to Python 3. I used Python 3.6 and Python 3.7 to do the porting. Nothing in the code should be particular to either version, though. But you’ll need to have Python 3 installed to use it, as most Linux bistros do these days. Another enhancement is that PulseCaster now relies on the excellent pulsectl library for Python, by George Filipkin and Mike Kazantsev. Hats off to them for doing a great job, which allowed me to remove many, many lines of code from this release. Also, due the use of PyGObject3 in this release, there are numerous improvements that make it easier for me to hack on. Silly issues with the GLib mainloop and other entrance/exit stupidity are hopefully a bit better now. Also, the code for dealing with temporary files is now a bit less ugly. I still want to do more work on the overall design and interface, and have ideas. I’ve gotten way better at time management since the last series of releases and hope to do some of this over the USA holiday season this late fall and winter (but no promises).

  • SFXR Qt 1.3.0

    I just released version 1.3.0 of SFXR Qt, my Qt port of the SFXR sound effect generator.

today's howtos

Programming Leftovers

  • post modern C tooling - draft

    Some of the C++ people have pulled off one of the cleverest and sneakiest tricks ever. They required 'modern' C99 and C11 features in 'recent' C++ standards. Microsoft has famously still clung onto some 80s version of C with their compiler for the longest time. So it's been a decade of hacks for people writing portable code in C. For a while I thought we'd be stuck in the 80s with C89 forever. However, now that some C99 and C11 features are more widely available in the Microsoft compiler, we can use these features in highly portable code (but forget about C17/C18 ISO/IEC 9899:2018/C2X stuff!!).

  • Reading and Writing YAML to a File in Python

    In this tutorial, we're going to learn how to use the YAML library in Python 3. YAML stands for Yet Another Markup Language. In recent years it has become very popular for its use in storing data in a serialized manner for configuration files. Since YAML essentially is a data format, the YAML library is quite brief, as the only functionality required of it is the ability to parse YAML formatted files. In this article we will start with seeing how data is stored in a YAML file, followed by loading that data into a Python object. Lastly, we will learn how to store a Python object in a YAML file. So, let's begin. Before we move further, there are a few prerequisites for this tutorial. You should have a basic understanding of Python's syntax, and/or have done at least beginner level programming experience with some other language. Other than that, the tutorial is quite simple and easy to follow for beginners.

  • Python Multiple Inheritance (with Examples)

    In this tutorial, we’ll describe Python Multiple Inheritance concept and explain how to use it in your programs. We’ll also cover multilevel inheritance, the super() function, and focus on the method resolution order. In the previous tutorial, we have gone through Python Class and Python (Single) Inheritance. There, you have seen that a child class inherits from a base class. However, Multiple Inheritance is a feature where a class can derive attributes and methods from more than one base classes. Hence, it creates a high level of complexity and ambiguity and known as the diamond problem in the technical world. We’ll be taking up this problem later in this tutorial.

  • Adding Methods Retroactively

    Imagine you have a "shapes" library. We have a Circle class, a Square class, etc. A Circle has a radius, a Square has a side, and maybe Rectangle has height and width. The library already exists: we do not want to change it. However, we do want to add an area calculation. If this was our library, we would just add an area method, so that we can call shape.area(), and not worry about what the shape is.