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Software

Software: BpyTOP, PGPainless, Todoist

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Software
  • BpyTOP – resource monitor tool

    The top utility needs little introduction to seasoned Linux users. top is a small utility that offers a dynamic real-time view of a running system. It allows users to monitor the processes that are running on a system. top has two main sections, with the first showing general system information such as the amount of time the system has been up, load averages, the number of running and sleeping tasks, as well as information on memory and swap usage. The second main section displays an ordered list of processes and their process ID number, the user who owns the process, the amount of resources the process is consuming (processor and memory), as well as the running time of that process. Some versions of top offer extensive customization of the display, such as choice of columns or sorting method.

    top remains a useful utility. It helps with system administration by identifying users and processes that are hogging the system. It is also useful for non-system administrators, helping to track and kill errant processes. However, top is showing its age and there are a bunch of utilities that offer a more feature-laden and visually attractive alternative.

    BpyTOP is an alternative to top. It’s a resource monitor that shows usage and stats for processor, memory, disks, network and processes. As its name suggests, its written in Python. What’s not obvious from its name is that BpyTOP is a port of bashtop, but it’s recommended to use BpyTOP rather than its predecessor.

  • PGPainless 0.1.0 released

    After two years and a dozen alpha versions I am very glad to announce the first stable release of PGPainless! The release is available on maven central.

    PGPainless aims to make using OpenPGP with Bouncycastle fun again by abstracting away most of the complexity and overhead that normally comes with it. At the same time PGPainless remains configurable by making heavy use of the builder pattern for almost everything.

  • There’s Now an Official Todoist App for Linux [Ed: Snaps help push proprietary software to GNU Linux users ("apps")]

    Prepare for a productivity boost because an official Todoist app for Linux desktops has been released.

    Todoist is a task and project management service with serious pedigree as more than 20 million people use it to arrange, plan, track, and collaborate on projects, tasks, and other todos.

    Official Todoist apps have long been available on Windows, macOS, Android, and iOS. Now Linux joins the family too.

  • [PCLinuxOS] Zoom updated to 5.2.454870.0831

    Zoom, the cloud meeting company, unifies cloud video conferencing, simple online meetings, and group messaging into one easy-to-use platform. Our solution offers the best video, audio, and screen-sharing experience across Zoom Rooms, Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android, and H.323/SIP room systems.

Best Free Internet Radio Software

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Software

Internet radio (also known as web radio, net radio, streaming radio, and online radio) is a digital audio service transmitted via the Internet.

Why do we like internet radio? There’s no sign-up or subscription charges. There’s a huge range of stations available from around the world. If you like classical music, pop music, folk music, news, talk radio, and much more, internet radio has something for everyone wherever you live (providing you have a net connection). Internet radio offers every format that is available on traditional broadcast radio stations.

There’s a wide range of free and open source software that lets you listen to internet radio. With so many different possibilities available it’s easy to get lost trying to find the right one for you.

Here’s our verdict on internet radio software. Features that are highly desirable include, but are not limited to, access to the community radio browser API or similar, recording streams, the ability to import/export a list of radio stations, good search functionality, station logos, reordering stations, as well as an attractive and easy-to-use interface. Other factors that help to determine our rating include things like the program’s stability, speed, memory usage, and more.

Only open source software is eligible for inclusion.

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System Cleaner BleachBit 4.1.0 Released with Pale Moon / Zoom Support

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Software

System cleaning software BleachBit 4.1.0 was released a few days ago with support for cleaning Pale Moon and Zoom.

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Hotspot Version 1.3.0 Released

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Software

  • Hotspot Version 1.3.0 Released

    We are pleased to announce a new release of our Hotspot Linux perf performance analysis GUI, Hotspot version 1.3.0!

    Hotspot is a replacement for perf reportthat takes a perf.data file, parses and evaluates its contents, and then displays the result in a graphical form. 

  • KDAB Releases Hotspot 1.3 For Visualizing Linux Perf Reports

    Open-source consulting firm KDAB has released Hotspot 1.3 as their GUI utility for visualizing Linux perf reports. 

    Hotspot is a utility for consuming data generated by Linux's perf subsystem and serves as a replacement to the command-line perf report functionality. 

    Hotspot 1.3 brings improvements for dealing with large and complex perf.data files, it is much faster than previous releases, and also properly supports perf analysis data that has been compressed using Zstd. On the user-interface side the Qt application has improved timeline handling, support for demangling rustc symbols, and a variety of smaller improvements. 

LibreOffice 7.0 Gets First Point Release, 79 Bugs Squashed

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Software

The Document Foundation released today LibreOffice 7.0.1 as the first point release in the latest LibreOffice 7.0 series of this very popular, free, open source and multi-platform office suite.

LibreOffice 7.0.1 is here to address a total of 79 bugs across various core components, improving document compatibility, as well as the overall stability and reliability of the LibreOffice 7.0 office suite series.

You can download LibreOffice 7.0.1 right now from the official website. But, for now, The Document Foundation doesn’t recommend LibreOffice 7.0 for enterprise deployments. This release is currently targeted at technology enthusiasts and power users who want to experiment with the new features and changes.

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GeckoLinux releases Pantheon and Budgie editions

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OS
Linux
News
Software
SUSE

The GeckoLinux project is pleased to announce the addition of the Pantheon and Budgie desktop environments to its lineup. Both desktop environments are offered with the choice of an openSUSE Leap 15.2 or openSUSE Tumbleweed base system, plus multimedia support from the Packman repository.

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Software Leftovers

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Software
  • Auto-cpufreq - CPU Speed and Power Optimizer for Linux Systems

    This guide, we explore yet another monitoring tool - auto-cpufreq - a CPU speed and power optimizer. In an earlier article, we looked at a user-friendly resource monitor known as Bashtop and saw just how easy it is to keep tabs on the system's performance straight from the terminal.

    Auto-cpufreq is an opensource command-line utility based on Python under the GPL 3.0 license. The tool monitors your CPU and prints metrics on the terminal such as the CPU usage, and frequency & temperature of each CPU core. Additionally, it monitors the state of your battery, system load, and turbo boost management.

  • RSS Guard 3.7.2

    RSS Guard is a simple (yet powerful) feed reader. It is able to fetch the most known feed formats, including RSS/RDF and ATOM. It's free, it's open-source. RSS Guard currently supports Czech, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian. RSS Guard will never depend on other services - this includes online news aggregators like Feedly, The Old Reader and others.

  • Latte Dock v0.10~ | Simplify Layouts Mode

    that is a major new feature, so please read carefully and take full backup before updating to Latte v0.9.86~ [~, stands for rapid development, in your distro package repos is mentioned as git version]

  • WordPress 5.5.1 Maintenance Release

    WordPress 5.5.1 is now available!

    This maintenance release features 34 bug fixes, 5 enhancements, and 5 bug fixes for the block editor. These bugs affect WordPress version 5.5, so you’ll want to upgrade.

    You can download WordPress 5.5.1 directly, or visit the Dashboard → Updates screen and click Update Now. If your sites support automatic background updates, they’ve already started the update process.

    WordPress 5.5.1 is a short-cycle maintenance release. The next major release will be version 5.6.

    To see a full list of changes, you can browse the list on Trac, read the 5.5.1 RC1 and 5.5.1 RC2 posts, or visit the 5.5.1 documentation page.

  • The Month in WordPress: August 2020

    August was special for WordPress lovers, as one of the most anticipated releases, WordPress 5.5, was launched. The month also saw several updates from various contributor teams, including the soft-launch of the Learn WordPress project and updates to Gutenberg. Read on to find out about the latest updates from the WordPress world.

Rclone Browser Enables You to Sync Data With Cloud Services in Linux Graphically

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Software
Web

If you want to use One Drive or Google Drive on Linux natively and effortlessly, you can opt for a premium GUI tool like Insync (affiliate link).

If you can put some effort in the terminal, you can use Rclone to sync with many cloud storage services on Linux. We have a detailed guide on using Rclone for syncing with OneDrive in Linux.

Rclone is a pretty popular and useful command-line tool. A lot of power users will need to use Rclone for its features.

However, not everyone is comfortable using it from the terminal even if it’s useful enough.

So, in this article, I’ll talk about an impressive GUI “Rclone Browser” that makes it easy to manage and sync your data on cloud storage using Rclone.

It is also worth noting that Rclone does offer an experimental web-based GUI — but we are going to focus on Rclone Browser here.

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Linux Mint’s Warpinator Is Now Available as a Flatpak for All Linux Distros

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Software

Linux Mint project’s lead developer Clement Lefebvre announced today that the Warpinator network transfer tool from the Linux Mint 20 distribution is now available as a Flatpak for all distros.

One of the attractions of the Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” release was Warpinator, a small utility that makes file sharing on the local network a breeze, and it also provides encryption so no one can intercept your network transfers. Warpinator was also recently ported to the LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) 4 operating system.

Warpinator is made by the Linux Mint team for Linux Mint, and, until now, there was no way to install it on other GNU/Linux distributions. But, as of today, Warpinator is available as a Flatpak app that you can install on virtually any Linux distro that supports the Flatpak universal binary format.

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Postfix vs. Sendmail

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Server
Software

Postfix and Sendmail are in the same category of Mail Transfer Agents. When selecting the MTA (Mail Transfer Agent) for your system, to choose the best option that meets your needs, you must consider a few important features, such as performance, security, documentation, and feasibility.

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More in Tux Machines

JDK 16: What’s coming in Java 16

Although not due to arrive until March 2021, Java Development Kit (JDK) 16 has begun to take shape, with proposed features including concurrent thread-stack processing for garbage collection, support for C++ 14 language features, and an “elastic metaspace” capability to more quickly return unused class metadata memory to the OS. JDK 16 will be the reference implementation of the version of standard Java set to follow JDK 15, which arrived September 15. The six-month release cadence for standard Java would have JDK 16 arriving next March. Read more

Linux Kernel Latest Developments and New Linux Foundation Report

  • AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT CPUFreq Governor Comparison With Linux 5.9

    One of the most frequent questions received at Phoronix in recent times is whether the "schedutil" governor is ready for widespread use and if it can compare in performance to, well, the "performance" governor on AMD Linux systems. Here are some benchmarks of an AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT using the latest Linux 5.9 development kernel in looking at the performance differences between the CPUFreq governor options of Ondemand, Powersave, Performance, and Schedutil.

  • Intel Engineers Begin Landing Open-Source Support For TDX, Intel Key Locker

    Last month Intel published a whitepaper on TDX as Trust Domain Extensions as a means of better securing virtual machines. TDX allows for isolating VMs from the hypervisor and other non-VMM system software. Intel TDX builds off other recent work around MKTME memory encryption and other features. We are now beginning to see that software side support roll-out along with the also-new Key Locker instructions.

  • HPE Preparing SGI UV5 Support For The Linux Kernel

    Recent hardware enablement work on the Linux kernel is HPE bringing up UV5 support. Succeeding the SGI UV4 support is now UV5 under the ownership of HPE. UV5 is the latest iteration of their x86_64 based supercomputer architecture.

  • Linux 5.10 To Support Nitro Enclaves For Security-Critical Applications

    The kernel support for Nitro Enclaves landed this week in char-misc-next ahead of the Linux 5.10 cycle kicking off next month. Nitro Enclaves is a capability of Amazon AWS' EC2 cloud for protecting highly sensitive data. Nitro Enclaves provide additional isolation and security by punting the sensitive work/data off to an isolated virtual machine without persistent storage access and other reductions to possible attack surfaces while also providing cryptographic attestation for ensuring only trusted/authorized code is running.

  • Linux Foundation Adds Entry-Level Certification

    The Linux Foundation has announced the development of a new entry-level certification exam to complement their existing Linux Foundation Certified Sysadmin (LFCS) and Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE) exams. This new certification, the Linux Foundation Certified IT Associate (LFCA), targets people just moving into systems administration.

  • How open-source software transformed the business world [Ed: Today ZDNet deletes GNU and Free software from history, citing this 'report' from LF (made using proprietary software)]

    The Linux Foundation goes into many examples, but I'm going to focus on telecommunications and networking since it's a field I know well. 

  • Software-defined vertical industries: transformation through open source

    What do some of the world’s largest, most regulated, complex, centuries-old industries such as banking, telecommunications, and energy have in common with rapid development, bleeding-edge innovative, creative industries such as the motion pictures industry? They’re all dependent on open source software.  That would be a great answer and correct, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. A complete answer is these industries not only depend on open source, but they’re building open source into the fabric of their R&D and development models. They are all dependent on the speed of innovation that collaborating in open source enables. 

More IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Red Hat OpenShift named as most widely deployed multicloud container platform

    US-based enterprise open source software solution provider Red Hat Inc’s Red Hat OpenShift has been named as the most widely deployed multicloud container platform, boosting powerful development and unified operations experiences across many public and on-premises platforms. In a statement today, Red Hat said OpenShift was evaluated by Forrester Research in The Forrester Wave: Multicloud Container Development Platforms, Q3 2020.

  • Ceph scales to 10 billion objects

    Ceph, the open source integrated file, block and object storage software, can support one billion objects. But can it scale to 10 billion objects and deliver good and predictable performance? Yes, according to Russ Fellows and Mohammad Rabin of the Evaluator Group who set up a Ceph cluster lab and, by using a huge metadata cache, scaled from zero to 10 billion 64KB objects. In their soon-to-be published white paper commissioned by Red Hat, “Massively Scalable Cloud Storage for Cloud Native Applications”, they report that setting up Ceph was complex – without actually using that word. “We found that, because of the many Ceph configuration and deployment options, it is important to consult with an experienced Ceph architect prior to deployment.”

  • What I learned as an engineering intern at Red Hat

    Interning at Red Hat has been one of the most challenging summers of my life, but it's been well worth it. Being an engineering intern working on Red Hat OpenShift's GitOps workflow has forced me to grow and learn more than ever before. My internship position on March 4th. A very short time later, COVID-19 caused companies to cancel their internships all over the United States. Thankfully, Red Hat announced that internships would go on in a virtual format.The Early Talent team made the necessary arrangements to make sure that our experience was impacted as little as possible by this change.

  • Start contributing to open source Call for Code projects

    Jumping into the open source world can be intimidating for the uninitiated. Don’t let fear of the unknown stop you from getting involved in open source. In this blog post, we cover some of the basics you need to know before contributing your first line of code. [...] Now that you understand that basic gist of open source, let’s go a little deeper. While some open source projects are small developer tools that help you accomplish a single task, other open source projects are large, complicated pieces of software that have interconnected parts. In these larger projects, different teams or working groups focus on developing specific parts of the technology, collaborating on the technology, peer reviewing and testing the code, and contributing their changes to the core tech.

  • Build Smart on Kubernetes World Tour: Developers’ path to platform freedom

    Without a doubt, Kubernetes is one of hottest open tech projects today and has been so for many years now. The reason for its durable, not-so-secret success? It’s the ability to containerize code, which frees developers from the constraint of writing code for one platform only and instead gives you the freedom of write-once, deploy-anywhere development. And why is this important? Enterprises know that the fastest route to app modernization depends on the ability to develop solutions that protect current tech investments, which likely run across multiple cloud platforms on and off premises. In other words, success depends on your ability to build solutions once and deploy them across multiple hybrid cloud platforms. Yep, containers tech delivers all of that and more. With that baseline, I’m writing to let you know that when it comes to learning Kubernetes, the IBM Developer advocates team has you completely covered with the Build Smart on Kubernetes World Tour. Since we launched the World Tour back in the fall of 2019, the team has delivered literally hundreds of free hands-on workshops globally to teach developers about the power of Kubernetes. It’s all part of the IBM Developer Way, delivering on our sole mission to teach the world’s developers about open tech through hands-on workshops and supporting content such as blog posts, tutorials, and videos. With the recent launch of new content on the Build Smart on Kubernetes World Tour site, it feels like a good time to provide a quick virtual tour of all that the site offers. Visit the updated site to find more than just upcoming tour events, but also self-paced learning options. You can now choose whether you learn at your own pace by viewing recorded content, register for upcoming live events, or, even better, both. I’m going to review each section to show you the details.

  • Mainframe Modernization Continues at Phoenix Software

    Tomorrow, Friday September 25, 2020, Phoenix Software International, Inc., will release (E)JES V6R0, an update to its z/OS system management product. This release includes enhancements to further modernization initiatives introduced in previous releases as well as brand new features that bring the accessibility of z/OS resources and tasks to other platforms. Concurrent with this release, Phoenix Software is also launching a new online documentation library within its secure customer support portal.

  • Poste Italiane Speeds Up Cloud-Native Application Development by 80% Using Red Hat’s Open Hybrid Cloud Technologies

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that Poste Italiane Group ("Poste Italiane" or the "Group") is building an innovation platform based on Red Hat’s open hybrid cloud portfolio, including Red Hat OpenShift. The platform is intended to support more and deeper connections with ecosystem partners, provide a more seamless customer experience to the Group’s 35 million customers along with access to an extensive, timely product and services portfolio, and support Italy’s growing digital economy.

  • Red Hat Advances Cloud-Native Analytics with New Kubernetes-Based Data Services

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the release of Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.5, delivering Kubernetes-based data services for modern, cloud-native applications across the open hybrid cloud. Tightly integrated with Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform, Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.5 is designed to help organizations enable a more seamless data services architecture for applications.

Screencasts and Audiocasts: KaOS 2020.09, Bandwhich, BSD Now, Ubuntu Podcast

  • KaOS 2020.09 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at KaOS 2020.09. Enjoy!

  • Bandwhich: Bandwidth Tracking So Simple Anyone Can Use It

    Sometimes you might need to check out what conenctions are being made to and from your computer and while you could always try and work out how an application like Wireshark works sometimes that's a bit over kill and you just want a rough idea of what's happening and that's where a tool like Bandwhich, a very simple bandwidth tracking tool becomes useful.

  • BSD Now #369: Where rc.d belongs

    High Availability Router/Firewall Using OpenBSD, CARP, pfsync, and ifstated, Building the Development Version of Emacs on NetBSD, rc.d belongs in libexec, not etc, FreeBSD 11.3 EOL, OPNsense 20.7.1 Released, MidnightBSD 1.2.7 out, and more.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E27 – Find a penny, pick it up

    This week we’ve been spying on our children and playing games on Twitch. We discuss the Ubuntu Community Council revival, GNOMEs new versioning scheme, Geary adding encryption support, Plasma 5.20, Xfce 4.16, Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 and Microsoft Edge coming Linux. We also round up our picks from the wider tech news.