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Software

Software: TLDR, Notes-Up, Bashhub, Mozilla, LibreOffice and GNU libmicrohttpd

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Software
  • TLDR summarizes Linux commands

    TLDR is a free command line utility for various Linux distributions that provides you with summaries of Linux commands on request.

    Linux commands can be quite intimidating, especially if you are a new user. While you may use the man command to get information on a particular command, man descriptions are often not the easiest to go through.

  • Notes-Up – A Markdown Note Editor & Manager for Elementary OS

    Notes Up is an open-source notes editor and manager aimed at Elementary OS. Its main attractions include a minimalist User Interface, an intuitive Markdown editor, support for keyboard shortcuts, dragging and dropping images, plugin extensions, and exporting notes to PDF.

    Although Notes-Up is aimed at Elementary OS, it is available for openSUSE and users of other Linux distros are free to try it out via its PPA.

  • Bashhub – Access Your Terminal History From Anywhere

    As you already know, all commands you run on your shell will be saved and you can view them at any time either by using history command or using UP/Down arrows keys or doing a reverse search using CTRL+R key combination from the Terminal. All commands that you run on the Terminal will be saved in .bash_history file. But you can view, access, and re-run them only from the same machine itself. What if you want to access your Terminal history from a different system on the network? No problem! Here is where “Bashhub” utility comes in help. It is a simple online web service where you can save all commands and access them from anywhere. Bashhub saves every commands entered across all sessions and systems, so you can access them from anywhere. To put this simply, your entire BASH history will be available in the cloud and the entire bash history is indexed, and searchable! Bashhub is completely free and open source.

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  • Mozilla's WebRender Making Good Progress, Can Be Tested On Firefox Nightly

    Mozilla engineers aren't letting up after their Quantum work in Firefox 57 that made the browser much faster. Next they have been improving WebRender and can be tested easily with Firefox Nightly.

    WebRender as a reminder is Mozilla's GPU-based renderer used currently within the Servo engine and has also been fitted into Firefox with Gecko. Those unfamiliar with WebRender can learn more about its architecture on their GitHub Wiki and this Mozilla Hacks blog post from last month.

  • LibreOffice Is Now Available on Flathub, the Flatpak App Store

    Its arrival allows anyone running a modern Linux distribution to install the latest stable release of LibreOffice in a click or two, without having to hunt down a PPA, tussle with tarballs or wait for a distro provider to package it up.

    A LibreOffice Flatpak has been available for users to download and install since August of last year and the LibreOffice 5.2 release.

    What’s “new” here is the distribution method. Rather than release updates through their own dedicated server The Document Foundation has opted to use Flathub.

  • Dialog Tunnelling

    I’m simply going to talk about what I’ve been currently working on in Collabora Online or LibreOffice Online, as part of my job at Collabora.

  • GNU libmicrohttpd 0.9.57 released
  • GNU libmicrohttpd 0.9.57 Brings Significant Improvements

    The libmicrohttpd GNU project is the C library that makes it easy to run an HTTP web-server as part of another application while being as small as about ~32k compiled.

Software: Trello, Brisk Menu, LibreOffice

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  • How to Get the Trello Desktop Client on Linux

    There’s no doubt that Trello is a great program. It helps both teams and individuals become more productive. The program emulates the experience of using Post-it notes to track the progress of work. It has quickly become one of the de facto tools in doing collaborative work and managing personal projects as well.

    Trello is available for web, mobile (App Store and Google Play), and desktop (Mac and Windows). It supports most platforms. However, there isn’t a Linux desktop version from the creators, which is too bad for the Linux users. Luckily, there’s a fix, thanks to generous Daniel Chatfield.

    Remember, this is not an official desktop client. It was only built by a generous person for Linux users who love Trello. The program is hosted on this GitHub page. Let’s go through the installation process step by step.

  • Brisk Menu – An Efficient Menu for the MATE Desktop

    Brisk Menu is an open-source menu designed for the Mate desktop environment which usually ships with Solus OS as its default menu applet. That notwithstanding, Brisk has functionalities on its own e.g. a built-in search feature that simulates the Windows start menu while still providing optimum performance.

    It features an adaptive UI which is themeable and put pressure on your battery and memory that is friendly and this comes to me as no surprise especially after learning that Brisk-menu is a collaborative project between Solus and Ubuntu MATE.

  • LibreOffice 6.0 Beta Available - Huge Open-Source Office Suite Update For 2018

    Today the branching of LibreOffice 6.0 from Git master took place as well as tagging the first beta.

    LibreOffice 6.0 Beta is currently available in source form as of writing and the code will continue to be refined via the libreoffice-6-0 branch until it's ready for release in early 2018. The mainline LibreOffice Git code meanwhile is bumped for early work on what's marked as LibreOffice 6.1.

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

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Software
  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements

    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.

  • TeX Live Cockpit

    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.

  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client

    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring.

    Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.

  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics

    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!

  • Products Over Projects

    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.

  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

Wine 2.22 Release and More

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 2.22 is now available.

  • Wine 2.22 Brings Improved 64-bit ARM Support

    Wine 2.22 is now available as the latest development release of this program to run Windows games/applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    Changes with this bi-weekly development release include a source selection dialog for scanners, improvements to ARM64 (AArch64 / 64-bit ARM) support, float audio formats with more than two channels in XAudio, fixes for DLL injection handling, input method improvements, and bug fixes.

  • Wine 2.22 is out with input improvements, XAudio improvements and a fix for The Witcher 3

    Wine 2.22 is now officially available as the latest development release on the road to the official Wine 3.0 release.

  • Using ‘Wine’ to Run Windows Games on Linux

    More and more people are switching to Linux. Why? Perhaps they’re seeking refuge from the flawed Windows operating systems. And Linux is becoming more accessible, partly because it can now provide much of what Windows can offer.

    Many apps have Linux alternatives. Microsoft Office, for example, can be replaced by LibreOffice. There are also 1,000s of games now available for Linux on Steam, and this number is increasing all the time.

    Yet every now and then, Windows users might still need an app that isn’t available on Linux or want to play a game that doesn’t have a Linux version. In these cases, they can use Wine to run whatever Windows programs they still need.

Oracle Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS to VirtualBox

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Software

Oracle recently updated their VirtualBox open-source and cross-platform virtualization software with initial support for the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series.

VirtualBox 5.2.2 is the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 5.2 stable series of the application, and it looks like it can be compiled and used on GNU/Linux distribution running the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel. It also makes it possible to run distros powered by Linux kernel 4.14 inside VirtualBox VMs.

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Applications: Snapcraft, Cutegram, LaTeX Editors, Spreadsheet Editors (Like Calc), Vivaldi

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Software

Software and Development: CodeBlocks, Cumulonimbus, LibreOffice, devRantron, GCC

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Development
Software
  • CodeBlocks – A Free & Cross-Platform C, C++ and Fortran IDE

    CodeBlocks is a free and open-source IDE for C, C++ and FORTRAN development. It features a consistent User Interface across all desktop platforms with a class browser, a tabbed interface, and its functions can be extended using plugins.

    It also features keyboard shortcuts, smart indentation, code folding, and a to-do list management panel that different users can use, among others. It is written in C++ and it does not require any interpreted languages or proprietary libraries.

  • Cumulonimbus: Terrible Name, Terrific Podcast Client

    Unlike many other Electron podcast apps I have come across on Github this one is still being developed, is easy to install, and it supports Linux.

  • LibreOffice Calc Is Finally Being Threaded

    While LibreOffice Calc for a while now has been offering OpenCL support for speeding up spreadsheet computations, with not all drivers/GPUs supporting OpenCL, this Microsoft Office alternative is finally receiving proper multi-threading support.

    Collabora developers have landed their initial work on multi-threading / parallelism as they look to speed-up the LibreOffice Calc spreadsheet program's calculations.

  • devRantron – An Unofficial Desktop Client for devRant Programmers

    devRantron is a free, open-source, and cross-platform (unofficial) desktop client for the famous Dev Rant Android and iOS social media application for programmers, developers, and designers.

    Before now, devRant was only accessible on the mobile phones, but now users can post complaints and follow up on rants by developers from all around the globe even while working on their desktops and it’s thanks to a group of friends who concluded that devRant was taking too long to deliver a desktop client.

  • The New Compiler Features & Changes Of GCC 8

    With GCC 8 feature development over and onto bug fixing, here is a look at some of the changes to find with the GCC 8 compiler stack that will be released as stable early next year in the form of GCC 8.1.

Software and Games Leftovers

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Software
Gaming

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

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Software
  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting

    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download.

    VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon.
    Why Vidcutter?

    If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily.

    VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More

    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases.

    The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.

  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows

    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux.

    It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.

  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements

    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes.

    MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

Software: Wpm, Wanna, Atelier, Narabu

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Software
  • Wpm – Measure Your Typing Speed From Terminal

    How is your weekend going, folks? Today, I’d like to share a command line utility that makes your weekend useful. Say hello to Wpm, a command line utility to test and improve your typing speed. Using Wpm, you can check and measure your typing speed from Terminal in words per minute. You may already be using any GUI-based utilities for this purpose. However, Wpm has many features that any GUI based typing speed tester utilities have.

  • Wanna – A Modern Eye Candy To-Do List App

    Today, we introduce to you a new project that is described in its GitHub page as an implementation of a 21st-century to-do list app. And who will beg to differ when the app is so spectacular it comes along with its own workflow and well-stated philosophy.

    Wanna is a modern cross-platform and open-source Electron-based To-Do list application with a focus on time management.

  • Monitoring 3DPrinters with Atelier

    One of the features that were asked a lot of times on our Telegram groups was the ability to monitor the 3DPrinter via a stream feed.

    Since we released the beta version of the AtCore couple weeks ago, we are trying now to get more work done with Atelier.

    In our project, Atelier is the interface running above AtCore. So it has a lot of more features than the AtCore TestClient has.

  • Introducing Narabu, part 6: Performance

    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec. You probably want to read part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4 and part 5 first.

    Like I wrote in part 5, there basically isn't a big splashy ending where everything is resolved here; you're basically getting some graphs with some open questions and some interesting observations.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: GNOME Shell, Bug Tracking, GXml

  • How to Install GNOME Shell Extensions GUI / CLI
    GNOME Shell extensions are small and lightweight pieces of codes that enhance GNOME desktop’s functionality and improves the user experience. They are the equivalent of add-ons in your browser. For instance, you can have add-ons that download videos like IDM downloader or block annoying ads such as Adblocker. Similarly, GNOME extensions perform certain tasks e.g. Display weather and geolocation. One of the tools used to install and customize GNOME Shell extensions is the GNOME tweak tool. It comes pre-installed in the latest Linux distributions. This article we cover how to install GNOME Shell extensions from GUI and from the command line on various Linux distros.
  • Musings on bug trackers
    I love bugzilla, I really do. I’ve used it nearly my entire career in free software. I know it well, I like the command line tool integration. But I’ve never had a day in bugzilla where I managed to resolve/triage/close nearly 100 issues. I managed to do that today with our gitlab instance and I didn’t even mean to.
  • ABI stability for GXml
    I’m taking a deep travel across Vala code; trying to figure out how things work. With my resent work on abstract methods for compact classes, may I have an idea on how to provide ABI stability to GXml. GXml have lot of interfaces for DOM4, implemented in classes, like Gom* series. But they are a lot, so go for each and add annotations, like Gee did, to improve ABI, is a hard work.

More on Barcelona Moving to Free Software

  • Barcelona Aims To Oust Microsoft In Open Source Drive
    The city of Barcelona has embarked on an ambitious open source effort aimed at reducing its dependence on large proprietary software vendors such as Microsoft, including the replacement of both applications and operating systems.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft software for open source software
    Barcelona, one of the most popular cities in the Europe is now switching to open-source software by replacing Microsoft Windows, Office and Exchange with Linux, Libre Office and Open Xchange respectively. The city council is already piloting the use of Ubuntu Linux desktops along with Mozilla Firefox as the default browser. With this move, Barcelona city is planning to save money over the years by reducing software/service licensing fees. They are also planning to hire new developers to write open-source software. The open-source product will also be made available to other Spanish municipalities and public bodies further afield allowing them the opportunity to save money on software licences.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft in favour of open source Linux software
    Catalan capital Barcelona is planning to ditch proprietary software products from Microsoft in favour of free, open source alternatives such as Open-Xchange email. That’s according to a report by Spain's national paper El Pais, which reports that Barcelona plans to invest 70% of its annual software budget in open source this year.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source turns 20
    While open source software is ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental infrastructure component as well as a critical factor for driving innovation, the "open source" label was coined only 20 years ago. The concept of open source software - as opposed to free software or freeware - is credited to Netscape which, in January 1998, announced plans to release the source code of its proprietary browser, Navigator, under a license that would freely permit modification and redistribution. This code is today the basis for Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird. The Open Source Initiative (OSI) regards that event as the point at which "software freedom extended its reach beyond the enthusiast community and began its ascent into the mainstream".
  • Coreboot 4.7 Released With 47 More Motherboards Supported, AMD Stoney Ridge
    Coreboot 4.7 is now available as the latest release of this free and open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement. Coreboot 4.7 is the latest tagged release for this project developed via Git. This release has initial support for AMD Stoney Ridge platforms, Intel ICH10 Southbridge support, Intel Denverton/Denverton-NS platform support, and initial work on supporting next-gen Intel Cannonlake platforms.
  • Thank you CUSEC!
    Last week, I spoke at CUSEC (Canadian Undergraduate Software Engineering Conference) in Montreal.   I really enjoy speaking with students and learning what they are working on.  They are the future of our industry!  I was so impressed by the level of organization and the kindness and thoughtfulness of the CUSEC organizing committee who were all students from various universities across Canada. I hope that you all are enjoying some much needed rest after your tremendous work in the months approaching the conference and last week.
  • Percona Announces Sneak Peek of Conference Breakout Sessions for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
  • The Universal Donor
    A few people reacted negatively to my article on why Public Domain software is broadly unsuitable for inclusion in a community open source project. Most argued that because public domain gave them the rights they need where they live (mostly the USA), I should not say it was wrong to use it. That demonstrates either parochialism or a misunderstanding of what public domain really means. It should not be used for the same reason code known to be subject to software patents should not be used — namely that only code that, to the best efforts possible, can be used by anyone, anywhere without the need to ask permission (e.g. by buying a patent license) or check it it’s needed (e.g. is that PD code PD here?) can be used in an open source project. Public domain fails the test for multiple reasons: global differences in copyright term, copyright as an unalienable moral rather than as a property right, and more. Yes, public domain may give you the rights you need. But in an open source project, it’s not enough for you to determine you personally have the rights you need. In order to function, every user and contributor of the project needs prior confidence they can use, improve and share the code, regardless of their location or the use to which they put it. That confidence also has to extend to their colleagues, customers and community as well.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04, Lubuntu 17.04 EoL

  • Ubuntu Core: A secure open source OS for IoT
    Canonical's Ubuntu Core, a tiny, transactional version of the Ubuntu Linux OS for IoT devices, runs highly secure Linux application packages, known as "snaps," that can be upgraded remotely.
  • Introducing the Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04
    Ubuntu’s changed a lot in the last year, and everything is leading up to a really exciting event: the release of 18.04 LTS! This next version of Ubuntu will once again offer a stable foundation for countless humans who use computers for work, play, art, relaxation, and creation. Among the various visual refreshes of Ubuntu, it’s also time to go to the community and ask for the best wallpapers. And it’s also time to look for a new video and music file that will be waiting for Ubuntu users on the install media’s Examples folder, to reassure them that their video and sound drivers are quite operational. Long-term support releases like Ubuntu 18.04 LTS are very important, because they are downloaded and installed ten times more often than every single interim release combined. That means that the wallpapers, video, and music that are shipped will be seen ten times more than in other releases. So artists, select your best works. Ubuntu enthusiasts, spread the word about the contest as far and wide as you can. Everyone can help make this next LTS version of Ubuntu an amazing success.
  • Lubuntu 17.04 has reached End of Life
    The Lubuntu Team announces that as a non-LTS release, 17.04 has a 9-month support cycle and, as such, reached end of life on Saturday, January 13, 2018. Lubuntu will no longer provide bug fixes or security updates for 17.04, and we strongly recommend that you update to 17.10, which continues to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes.