Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Audacious 3.8 Free Music Player Is Out, Finally Lets You Run Multiple Instances

    A new stable version of the Audacious open-source and cross-platform audio playback application has been announced for both GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows platforms, version 3.8.

    Audacious 3.8 has been in development since early August when the first Beta milestone was announced, and it received a second Beta build in early September. But now the wait is finally over, and you can get your hands on the final release, which brings tons of new features and improvements.

    Probably the most important change implemented in Audacious 3.8 are the ability to run multiple instances of the application, something that wasn't possible with any of the previous releases except the Beta versions of the 3.8 milestone. Best of all, each running Audacious instance remembers its own configuration.

  • WadC 2.1

    Today I released version 2.1 of Wad Compiler, a lazy functional programming language and IDE for the construction of Doom maps.

  • Vivaldi browser: Interview with Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner

    Vivaldi browser has taken the world of internet browsing by storm, and only months after its initial release it has found its way into the computers of millions of power users. In this interview, Mr.Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner talks about how he got the idea to create this project and what to expect in the future.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Are Getting KDE Plasma 5.7.5 and Applications 16.08.1

    Today, September 22, 2016, Chakra GNU/Linux maintainer Neofytos Kolokotronis announced that the rolling operating system is now getting the latest software updates and technologies.

  • Blender nightly in Flatpak

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • mrxvt looking for maintainers

    mrxvt is a cool light-weight terminal emulator, not tied to a specific desktop environment and with minimal dependency. This was also one of my very first bigger contributions to Free Software. Well I had patches here and there before, but that’s one project where I stuck around longer and where I was quickly given commit rights. So it is dear to my heart. It was also my first big feature attempt since I started a branch to add UTF-8 support (actually any-encoding support), which is the normal way of things now but at the time, many software and distributions were still not working with UTF-8 as a default. Then I left for years-long wandering our planet on a motorcycle (as people who know me are aware) and because of this, drastically slowed down FLOSS contributions until a few years ago. Back as a contributor, mrxvt is not my main project anymore (you know which these are: GIMP and ZeMarmot!). I moved on.

  • Flowblade 1.8 Released, Supports Keyboard Trimming, Clip Snapping

    The open-source video editor Flowblade has a new release available for download.

    Flowblade 1.8 arrives with a batch of key improvements into, including the ability to trim clips using the arrow keys on your keyboard.

    This way of working, say the Flowblade team, feels “more convenient and precise then always working with a mouse

  • News about Blender second release candidate and other projects.

    The Chairman Blender Foundation and producer Blender Institute, Mr. Ton Roosendaal comw with this news about second release candidate and other projects...

  • Microsoft Updates Skype for Linux to Version 1.8 [Ed: malicious software]
  • Opera for Desktop Gets Free VPN on Windows, Linux, and Mac

    After bringing its free VPN services to iOS and Android, Opera has now released a free, no-login VPN for desktop users as well. The VPN is bundled in to the Opera browser and requires no sign-in or any setup - using it is as simple as the press of a single button. What this does is make using a VPN simple even for users who are not technologically-inclined. Opera's browser VPN was first launched as a beta in April this year.

    A month later, Opera VPN was available as a standalone app on iOS. The VPN was then launched for Android in August before finally rolling out the final version for desktop users now.

Wine-Staging 1.9.19

Filed under
Software
  • Wine-Staging 1.9.19 Released

    Wine-Staging 1.9.19 was released this weekend as the latest experimental patch-set atop of the newest bi-weekly Wine release.

  • Release 1.9.19

    The Wine Staging release 1.9.19 is now available.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Wine 1.9.19 Released with Better Joystick Support, World of Tanks Improvements

Filed under
Software

The Wine software has been updated today, September 16, 2016, to version 1.9.19, a development milestone towards Wine 2.0, bringing various bug fixes and improvements.

Read more

Also: Wine 1.9.19 Brings Input Improvements, DC Rendering In Direct2D

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • A Promising New eBook Reader for Linux Appears

    I don’t spend as much time reading as I should, even though I own a Kindle and an Android tablet.

    It’s not that I have a shortage of things to read, either. I have a huge backlog of eBooks.

    The reason is simple that when I’m “idling” I’m typically in front a regular computer, be it my desktop or a laptop.

    I’ve been on the hunt for a simple, straight-forward ePub reader app for the Linux desktop. Calibre is overkill (not to mention more of an eBook manager than an eBook reader) and the apps available in the Ubuntu Software store look horribly outdated.

  • What's your favorite tool for remote team collaboration?
  • Insomnia 3.0 Is a Slick Desktop REST Client for Linux

    Looking for a free, easy-to-use REST client for the Linux desktop? Don't lose sleep: get Insomnia.

  • New Version of Museeks Music Player Now Available to Download

    A new version of cross-platform music player Museeks is now available to download. The Museeks 0.7.0 update adds a number of improvements, including the ability to see cover art of playing tracks, a new first-run guide to help you add music to the player, and an option to run the app with a native window titlebar.

  • GNU Bash 4.4 Released With Wide Variety Of Changes

    GNU Bash 4.4 was released today with a wide variety of new features and changes.

  • Apple Releases CUPS 2.2 Printing System
  • Libreboot Leaves The GNU, The Free Software Foundation Denounced
  • libreboot is not GNU Libreboot anymore

    The Free Software Foundation recently fired a transgendered employee of the FSF, just for being trans, because some transphobic cissexist people wrote negativly about her. The FSF fired her because they thougdt she, rather than the assholes bullying her, was causing the FSF potential damage. As a result, she was fired from the FSF.

  • LLVM Clang 3.9 Mostly Trails GCC In Compiler Performance

    Following yesterday's GCC 5 vs. 6 vs. early 7 benchmarks, to no surprise LLVM's Clang compiler was brought up in the comments. I had already been running some fresh LLVM Clang benchmarks on this same Intel Xeon system and have those results to share now with Clang 3.8 and the newly-released Clang 3.9.

    This is the first time in a number of months I've carried out a large comparison of GCC vs. Clang using the latest compiler releases. For today's article are the GCC 5.4.0, GCC 6.2.0, and GCC 7.0.0 20160904 compiler benchmarks compared to LLVM Clang 3.8.0 and the new Clang 3.9.0 release. Interestingly, these benchmarks show a number of performance regressions in the generated binaries under Clang 3.9.

  • Chrome 54 Beta Brings Custom Elements V1: Create Custom HTML Tags

    Google today is rolling out the Chromium/Chrome 54 web-browser beta, which incorporates several new features for web developers plus media platform improvements for Chrome on Android.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Vim 8.0 released
  • MKVToolNix 9.4.2 Free MKV Manipulation App Improves the AVC and HEVC Readers

    On September 11, 2016, MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus released the first maintenance update to the major 9.4 series, version 9.4.1, with various improvements to the mkvmerge component, and several bug fixes.

    MKVToolNix 9.4.1 is dubbed "Black Rain," and, according to the release notes, it looks like it adds many improvements to the mkvmerge tool, a component that lets users merge MKV files with different audio, video, or subtitle streams. For example, the HEVC parser, MP4 reader, and AAC reader received various fixes.

  • qBittorrent 3.3.7 Free BitTorrent Client Removes KickassTorrents Search Engine

    A new stable version of the open-source, free, and cross-platform qBittorrent BitTorrent client used in Linux, Mac, and Windows computers was released on September 11, 2016.

    qBittorrent 3.3.7 comes one and a half months after the launch of the previous maintenance update, namely qBittorrent 3.3.6, and, according to the release notes, it only adds a single feature, fixes four annoying issues reported by users since then, and updates the search functionality.

  • Orion Is a Qt/QML Twitch desktop Client That I’d Love To Try

    It feels a little bit mean to write about an app that I know most of you won’t get to try anytime soon. But when I saw Orion, a Qt-based Twitch desktop app, surface on Reddit this evening I …I felt like I had to mention it here.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

Parental Controls for Linux Unleashed

For years, one of the overlooked areas for the Linux desktop was access to “effective” parental controls. Back in 2003, I remember the now defunct Linspire (then known as Lindows) offered a proprietary option called SurfSafe. Surprisingly, at least back then, the product worked very well in providing accurate content filtering capabilities; something that was not,in fact, available and easy-to-use at that time. Years later, an open-source alternative was released to the greater Linux community known as GNOME Nanny. Fantastic in terms of usage control, its web content web filter was laughably terrible. As expected, crowd-sourcing a filtering list isn’t a great solution. And like SurfSafe, the project is now defunct. Read more

Chapeau 24 Cancellara - Same same but different

Fedora plus Moka icons plus some extra software, mainly coming from proprietary sources. I guess that's the best way to describe Chapeau. But then, what separates one distro from another if not a collection of decorations, as software is essentially the same, apart from a very small number of standalone distributions trying to develop their own identity with their own desktop environments and app stack, re: elementary or Solus + Budgie? Except they struggle, too. Chapeau 24 is a nice effort to make Fedora friendlier, but then it does not achieve the needed result without pain. The biggest issues included a botched smartphone support. Samba woes and the horrible bootloader bug. Other than that, it behaved more or less the same way as the parent distro. Then again, why bother if you can pimp up Fedora without any loss of functionality? I do like Chapeau Cancellara, but I cannot ignore the fact Fedora does the same with fewer problems. All in all, it's a welcome effort, but it needs more polish. It does not quite capture the heart the way Fuduntu did. And with some issues looming high above the distro, the grade can only be about 6/10. Most importantly, the bootloader setup must be flawless, and there's not excuse for small app errors that we've seen. We know it can do more. Anyhow, if you're not keen on any self-service round Fedora, this could be a good test bed for your games. A moderately worthy if somewhat risky and flawed experience. Read more

Mofo Linux: The Raw Materials for Security

The developers of Mofo Linux talk a good game. From the name’s origin in abusive street slang to its self-description on the home page as “Linux designed to defeat state censorship and surveillance,” Mofo presents itself as a champion of security and privacy. Nor is the claim unjustified. However, rather than putting security and privacy into the hands of ordinary users, Mofo simply presents the tools and leaves users to figure them out with a minimum of help. The result is a promising distribution that with only slightly more work, could be a leading one. Just possibly, though, this approach is a deliberate tactic, and not the carelessness it appears. Based on Ubuntu, the current release of Mofo offers nothing different in the way of productivity tools. It uses Unity for a desktop, and its applications are the standard GNOME ones. In fact, Mofo shows such little interest in such matters that it does not bother to change the title bar in the installer from Ubuntu. Read more