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Software

Violin – minimalistic desktop music player (and Avidemux 2.7.4 released)

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Software

Over the past few months I’ve covered scores of open source graphical music players. They’ve been a mixed bag. Some are genuinely excellent, others falling short of my (fairly) modest requirements. Many of them purport to be lightweight.

There’s a new music player on the block. It’s called Violin, seeing its first release in March this year. The author bills his multimedia app as “… fast, lightweight, and minimalistic desktop music player”.

The software is written in the JavaScript language using Electron, an open-source framework developed and maintained by GitHub. Violin is published under an open source license.

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Also: Avidemux 2.7.4 Released with Tons of Bug-fixes (How to Install)

APT Patterns

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Software
Debian

Patterns allow you to specify complex search queries to select the packages you want to install/show. For example, the pattern ?garbage can be used to find all packages that have been automatically installed but are no longer depended upon by manually installed packages. Or the pattern ?automatic allows you find all automatically installed packages.

You can combine patterns into more complex ones; for example, ?and(?automatic,?obsolete) matches all automatically installed packages that do not exist any longer in a repository.

There are also explicit targets, so you can perform queries like ?for x: ?depends(?recommends(x)): Find all packages x that depend on another package that recommends x. I do not fully comprehend those yet - I did not manage to create a pattern that matches all manually installed packages that a meta-package depends upon. I am not sure it is possible.

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LiVES Video Editor 3.0 is Here With Significant Improvements

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Software

We recently covered a list of best open source video editors. LiVES is one of those open source video editors, available for free.

Even though a lot of users are still waiting for the release on Windows, a major update just popped up for LiVES Video Editor (i.e v3.0.1 as the latest package) on Linux. The new upgrade includes some new features and improvements.

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Also: elfutils 0.177 released with eu-elfclassify

Audio: Clementine Music Player, Python Bytes and LINUX Unplugged

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Software
  • Clementine Music Player for All Your Audio Needs

    VLC is a mainstay for most fans of FOSS technology and most Linux distros. It’s a great little player, don’t get me wrong, but if you have a large library of audio files, some times you need something more powerful.

    The Clementine Music Player is a full-service audio player with all the tools you need to keep track of your audio library. According to the project’s website, Clementine “inspired by Amarok 1.4, focusing on a fast and easy-to-use interface for searching and playing your music.”

  • Episode #143: Spike the robot, powered by Python!
  • Bigger. Faster. Harder to Maintain. | LINUX Unplugged 314

    It's huge, and it's getting bigger every month. How do you test the Linux Kernel? Major Hayden from Red Hat joins us to discuss their efforts to automate Kernel bug hunting.

    Plus our honest conversation about which Linux works best for us.

10 Best Free Linux Document Management Systems (Updated 2019)

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Software

Document Management is an information technology that has taken over from legacy systems of manual or server based file sharing, the electronic filing cabinet, to control policies and procedures. It is one of the functions provided by Enterprise Content Management.

A document management system enables individuals and businesses to manage documents, making it easy to locate a previous document version. This is important from a record control perspective, and to ensure that compliance standards are met within a user-friendly environment.

The main benefit offered by a document management system is that it gives individuals and businesses the tools to store and index many different types of documents and electronic files. Information and knowledge within the organisation can be accessed as appropriate, leading to an increase in productivity. Any kind of binary data can be stored in the document system. Other uses of this type of system include document workflow, records management, image management, disaster recovery, backup, and access control.

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Software: Cast to TV GNOME Shell, Easy rTorrent + ruTorrent, Cantata

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Software
  • Cast To TV v10 GNOME Extension Adds Support For Casting To Other Linux Devices

    Cast to TV GNOME Shell extension v10 brings Playercast app support, allowing users to cast media files to other Linux devices on the same network remotely, from GNOME Shell.

    Cast to TV is a GNOME Shell extension to cast videos, music and pictures to Chromecast or other devices over a local network. It supports video transcoding on the fly (for videos that can't directly play on the device), customizable subtitles, it can show a music visualizer while casting music, and much more. For controlling the device, the Gnome Shell extensions adds a new button on the top panel with playback controls.

    The latest v10 release of Cast to TV extension doesn't come with any exciting features for Chromecasts, but it brings support for Playercast app.

  • Easy rTorrent + ruTorrent Installation And Configuration Script For Debian Or Ubuntu

    Installing and setting up rTorrent and ruTorrent on an Ubuntu or Debian server can be a complicated, tedious task, specially for inexperienced users. rtinst is a script that makes this easier, by automatically installing and configuring rTorrent, ruTorrent (stable or master), and everything else needed for an Ubuntu or Debian (including on Raspberry Pi) seedbox.

    The script was updated recently with some important improvements, like support for the latest Debian 10 (buster) stable release, and automatic Let's Encrypt certificates generation if possible (in case it fails, it falls back to self-signed certificates).

    rTorrent is a text-based ncurses BitTorrent client based on libTorrent, great for usage on servers, while ruTorrent is a web front-end for rTorrent.

  • Listen to Online Radio on Ubuntu through Cantata

    There are many ways through which you can listen to online radio through Ubuntu. However, if you are looking for a stable application that gives you dedicated access to a large number of radio stations, we recommend using Cantata. It is a free graphical MPD client for Linux, macOS, Windows, and Haiku.

    In this article, we will explain how you can install Cantata to your Ubuntu through the official Ubuntu repositories, and also through the PPA(for latest version). We will also explain how you can set up and use Cantata to listen to online radio stations.

Top 20 Best Plotting Tools for Linux for Creating Scientific Graphs

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GNU
Linux
Software

Plotting tool refers to computer software, which helps to represent a data set in a scientific nature. It is an essential tool for academics, scientists, and engineers as well. Besides this, you can use these applications to prepare presentations. Fortunately, like the other platforms, Linux is also enriched with a lot of plotting tools. Most of the applications we listed in this article are open source. Also, you will get them for free. They offer some advanced features through the paid version.

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Backups: Duplicati and Back In Time for Data Backups

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Software
  • Use Duplicati to Backup Debian, Ubuntu, Linux Mint Desktop & Server [Ed: Sadly, C# and puts files in surveillance services]

    Duplicati is full-featured, open source backup software, which can run on Linux, MacOS, Windows and Synology. It allows you to back up local files and directories to the cloud (such as Amazon S3, Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive, etc) in encrypted form and schedule automated backups. This tutorial is going to show you how to install and use Duplicati on Debian, Ubuntu and Linux Mint.

  • Nathan Wolf: Back In Time for Data Backups on openSUSE | Retrospective

    The lack of data security is something that has recently affected some municipal governments in a negative way. Atlanta in 2018 was attacked with a ransomware and demanded $51,000 before they would unlock it. Baltimore was hit a second time this past May [2019]. I am not a security expert but in my non-expert opinion, just keeping regular backups of your data would have prevented needing to spend a ransom to get your data back. It would also help to run openSUSE Linux or one of the many other Linux options on the desktop to reduce the impact of a user induced damage due to wayward link-clicking.

    If you are interested in keeping your personal data ?safe,? offline backups are an absolute requirement. Relying only on Google Drive, Dropbox, Nextcloud or whatever it may be is just not not adequate. Those are a synchronizing solution and can be a part of your data-safekeeping strategy but not the entirety of it.

    I have been using Back In Time as my backup strategy, in this time, I have only had to restore a backup once but that was an elected procedure. Back In Time is great because it is a Qt based application so it looks good in KDE Plasma

Programming: Git Alligator, Jenkins World, Python and Perl

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Development
Software
  • Git Alligator

    For each thing that I work on, I make a branch; if it’s attached to a Calamares issue, I’ll name it after the issue number. If it’s a different bit of work, I’ll name it more creatively. The branch is branched off of master (which is always in a good state). Then I go and work on the branch – commit early, commit often – until the issue is resolved or the feature implemented or whatever.

    In a codebase where I’m the only contributor, or the gatekeeper for it so that I know that master remains unchanged, I know a merge can go in painlessly. In a codebase with more contributors, I might merge upstream master into my branch right at the end as a sanity check (right at the end because most of these branches are short-lived, a day or two at most for any given issue).

    The alligator effect comes in when merging back to master: I always use --no-ff and I try to write an additional summary description of the branch in the merge commit.

    Here’s a screenshot of Calamares history, from qgit, turned on its side like an alligator crawling to the right, (cropped a little so you don’t see where I don’t follow my own precepts and annotated with branch names).

  • Jenkins World 2019: Sacha Labourey Q&A

    “We’re always actively looking at deals that make sense. To be truthful, we’ve set the bar pretty high at the moment. Not only are we focusing hard on executing on those acquisitions, we’re delivering on a vision we’ve laid out for the future in a category we call Software Delivery Management.”

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (cxc) stackoverflow python report
  • ListenData: Python : Learn Object Oriented Programming in 3 Hours

    This tutorial outlines object oriented programming (OOP) in Python with examples. It is a step by step guide which was designed for people who have no programming experience. Object Oriented Programming is popular and available in other programming languages besides Python which are Java, C++, PHP.

  • PerlCon 2019 in Rīga

    This year our Perl conference took place in Rīga under the new and improved name PerlCon. Improving names was generally a hot topic, I won't go into details here, but please do checkout the discussion and participate!

Software and Games Leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Chrome 77 Beta: New performance metrics, new form capabilities, capabilities in origin trials and more

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Learn more about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 77 is beta as of August 8, 2019.

  • Google Chrome 77 Enters Beta

    Following the Chrome 76 release from just over one week ago, Google has now issued the beta for the Chrome/Chromium 77 series.

  • Top 15 Best Linux Emulators for Windows System in 2019 [Ed: Those are not emulators]

    As much as we love Linux, we all have to agree on Windows’s massive dominance in the industry. Due to being the most widely used operating system for personal computers since the last couple of decades, Microsoft Windows enjoys a widespread usage in the business world. If you’re a Linux enthusiast but need to utilize Windows for your Job or academic purposes, you don’t need to be disappointed anymore. There are powerful Linux emulators for Windows which allow you to run Linux programs seamlessly in your Windows machine without having to install a fresh copy of your favorite distro.

  • Batman Arkham Origins | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play

    Batman Arkham Origins running through Steam play.

  • The absolutely insane hardcore platformer Electronic Super Joy 2 is out for free

    Almost six years after the original, Michael Todd Games returns to inflict more painful hardcore platforming with slick beats in Electronic Super Joy 2 which is out now. Technically the third game, since Electronic Super Joy: Groove City was also released back in 2014.

    It's…difficult, maddeningly so in some areas. This is a game designed to make you furious, yet it's so damn good at the same time. I will fully admit to being absolutely atrocious at it, hardcore platformers aren't usually something that I go for but Electronic Super Joy 2 has the right amount of weird for me to enjoy it.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle launches completely autonomous operating system

Together, these two solutions provide automated patching, updates, and tuning. This includes 100 percent automatic daily security updates to the Linux kernel and user space library. In addition, patching can be done while the system is running, instead of a sysadmin having to take systems down to patch them. This reduces downtime and helps to eliminate some of the friction between developers and IT, explained Coekaerts. Read more

Software: Zotero, PulseCaster and Qt Port of SFXR

  • Zotero and LibreOffice

    If you’re working with LibreOffice and need to create a bibliography, this software makes it simple to manage your citations. You can tell how few people use LibreOffice’s Bibliography Database by the fact that a bug that would take 10 minutes to fix has survived since 2002. Instead, those who need bibliographies or citations rely on other software such as Zotero, which can be integrated into LibreOffice with an extension. That robust bug is that the Citation Format in the database table is called the Short Name in the input fields. Even more confusing, the examples give an arbitrary name, when to work with the citation insertion tool in Insert | Table of Contents and Index | Insert Bibliography Entry, it should in a standard form, such as (Byfield: 2016) for the MLA format. Add the fact that a single database is used for all files – an absurdity in these memory-rich days – and the neglect of the Bibliography Database is completely understandable.

  • PulseCaster 0.9 released!

    For starters, PulseCaster is now ported to Python 3. I used Python 3.6 and Python 3.7 to do the porting. Nothing in the code should be particular to either version, though. But you’ll need to have Python 3 installed to use it, as most Linux bistros do these days. Another enhancement is that PulseCaster now relies on the excellent pulsectl library for Python, by George Filipkin and Mike Kazantsev. Hats off to them for doing a great job, which allowed me to remove many, many lines of code from this release. Also, due the use of PyGObject3 in this release, there are numerous improvements that make it easier for me to hack on. Silly issues with the GLib mainloop and other entrance/exit stupidity are hopefully a bit better now. Also, the code for dealing with temporary files is now a bit less ugly. I still want to do more work on the overall design and interface, and have ideas. I’ve gotten way better at time management since the last series of releases and hope to do some of this over the USA holiday season this late fall and winter (but no promises).

  • SFXR Qt 1.3.0

    I just released version 1.3.0 of SFXR Qt, my Qt port of the SFXR sound effect generator.

today's howtos

Programming Leftovers

  • post modern C tooling - draft

    Some of the C++ people have pulled off one of the cleverest and sneakiest tricks ever. They required 'modern' C99 and C11 features in 'recent' C++ standards. Microsoft has famously still clung onto some 80s version of C with their compiler for the longest time. So it's been a decade of hacks for people writing portable code in C. For a while I thought we'd be stuck in the 80s with C89 forever. However, now that some C99 and C11 features are more widely available in the Microsoft compiler, we can use these features in highly portable code (but forget about C17/C18 ISO/IEC 9899:2018/C2X stuff!!).

  • Reading and Writing YAML to a File in Python

    In this tutorial, we're going to learn how to use the YAML library in Python 3. YAML stands for Yet Another Markup Language. In recent years it has become very popular for its use in storing data in a serialized manner for configuration files. Since YAML essentially is a data format, the YAML library is quite brief, as the only functionality required of it is the ability to parse YAML formatted files. In this article we will start with seeing how data is stored in a YAML file, followed by loading that data into a Python object. Lastly, we will learn how to store a Python object in a YAML file. So, let's begin. Before we move further, there are a few prerequisites for this tutorial. You should have a basic understanding of Python's syntax, and/or have done at least beginner level programming experience with some other language. Other than that, the tutorial is quite simple and easy to follow for beginners.

  • Python Multiple Inheritance (with Examples)

    In this tutorial, we’ll describe Python Multiple Inheritance concept and explain how to use it in your programs. We’ll also cover multilevel inheritance, the super() function, and focus on the method resolution order. In the previous tutorial, we have gone through Python Class and Python (Single) Inheritance. There, you have seen that a child class inherits from a base class. However, Multiple Inheritance is a feature where a class can derive attributes and methods from more than one base classes. Hence, it creates a high level of complexity and ambiguity and known as the diamond problem in the technical world. We’ll be taking up this problem later in this tutorial.

  • Adding Methods Retroactively

    Imagine you have a "shapes" library. We have a Circle class, a Square class, etc. A Circle has a radius, a Square has a side, and maybe Rectangle has height and width. The library already exists: we do not want to change it. However, we do want to add an area calculation. If this was our library, we would just add an area method, so that we can call shape.area(), and not worry about what the shape is.